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by Iain Dickie

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Author: Iain Dickie
ISBN: 1848841159
Language: English
Pages: 176 pages
Category: Crafts & Hobbies
Publisher: Pen and Sword (July 19, 2010)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: lit docx txt mobi
FB2 size: 1117 kb | EPUB size: 1910 kb | DJVU size: 1826 kb
Sub: Hobbies

I have been gaming for well over 15 years, and I am big on gaming on a budget. Iain Dickie is a genius

I have been gaming for well over 15 years, and I am big on gaming on a budget. Anything I can do so I can put more time and money into my games, I try to do, and I got the impression this book would be full of tips and tricks to help in that. For the 'old school' gamer of the 70's or 80's (or earlier) this book might be perfect. Iain Dickie is a genius. He has written a book that is clearly aimed at people who are new to wargaming yet and while staying true to this, has penned a manual that has something for all wargamers.

Iain Dickie is a genius. This book reads like a fireside chat from your father or grandfather and, in similar manner, you will find yourself agreeing with some sentiments and not with others, but nonetheless respecting the author of them all (hopefully!). The book is enjoyable and easy to read. Throughout the book Dickie remains true to the idea of wargaming on a budget, giving the reader numerous ideas of how to beg, borrow, re-use, improvise and recycle materials for numerous uses associated with our hobby.

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He's even been on the telly, appearing alongside Angela Rippon in Games of War.

This new book from Casemate Publishing is on how to Wargame on a budget because of how expensive it can be or when you don't have a lot of space. Ian Dickie shows you how you can enjoy this hobby without the large expense and a smaller amount of space if need be. The book is divided up into 10 chapters not including an introduction. Company: Pen and Sword Books Ltd.

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Authors : Iain Dickie. There is no-one in the office at the Weekend. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Condition : New. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 10 brand new listings. Hobbies, Pastimes & Indoor Games.

Gaming Constrained by Money or Space. Reference Wargaming Modelling Colour Books Military

Gaming Constrained by Money or Space. Reference Wargaming Modelling Colour Books Military. By Iain Dickie Imprint: Pen & Sword Military Pages: 176 ISBN: 9781848841154 Published: 5th July 2010. Wargaming on a Budget is a new book from Ian Dickie that should find a place on the shelves of every gamer limited by money and/or space (and that’s 95% of us). Trying to hit a happy medium between quality and cost, Dickie has produced 176 pages of concrete advice on making wargames tables, figures, outdoor terrain, buildings, ships and airplanes. There’s also a section on the types of games that you can play to get the most bang for your buck (skirmish, et. a.

Wargaming can be a very expensive hobby, but it needn't be. Iain Dickie, one of the best-known names in the hobby shares dozens of hints and tips on how to cut the cost of your gaming and get 'more bang for your buck'. He offers sound practical advice on buying and building your armies (should you opt for metal, plastic, or even card, and in which scale?), gaming tables, terrain, buildings and even storage solutions. As well as purely financial constraints, Iain Dickie also recognizes the fact that available space is another major restriction for many gamers and tackles this issue too. Now you've got no excuse not to get wargaming!
Comments (5)
Rich Vulture
I have been gaming for well over 15 years, and I am big on gaming on a budget. Anything I can do so I can put more time and money into my games, I try to do, and I got the impression this book would be full of tips and tricks to help in that.

For the 'old school' gamer of the 70's or 80's (or earlier) this book might be perfect. For anyone else, you will probably not get much out of it. I spent the weekend reviewing it and managed to get maybe three good ideas that I could use out of the whole thing. First, you may have issues with the language. It has been said "The United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language." - George Bernard Shaw. This book brought that into reality for me. Some parts were difficult to follow as a result. I could understand what he was saying, it was just of no use to me. Not to say it would be bad for someone from Great Britain, just be aware. It reads like a friend from the pub giving you advice.

The photos were good for construction of a gaming table. The terrain construction photos were also interesting, and gave me ideas for other projects. But, there was nothing in this book that I could not find for free online, with more relevance to modern gaming. A portion of the rules are given over to casting your own figures, which is largely unnecessary today due to the availability of miniatures. Another portion was about creating your own rules and scenarios. Again, highly outdated (in my opinion) given the wide variety of rules that are available today.

This book would be a boon to a gamer decades ago. Today, you are better off using resources available on the internet. Between the outdated advice and language/cultural differences, I doubt I will ever be opening this one again.
Larosa
Plenty of neat ideas.
Kage
The book had a few basic ideas for terrain construction and developed them at length, but the basic ideas were not new or novel. You can quickly pick up the same ideas from looking around conventions and/or checking out mobile model railroad dioramas.
Quamar
OK, I've been a miniature wargamer for a long time, and I haven't always had money. A few years ago, for a contest, I put 500 25mm castings on a table--board, rules and terrain--for $100. Someone who wants $30 to tell me how to save my wargaming money had best be REALLY good.
This isn't. There are good ideas in here, but few of them are original, and they're not developed. If you've been hanging around the hobby, you've heard most of them, and often more than once. There is, for instance, a chapter on types of miniatures games requiring relatively few figures--skirmishes, gladiatorial combat and so forth. Some aren't miniatures--"satellite wars"--and some don't save money: foraging games just means you buy farm animals instead of soldiers. Campaign games and solo gaming mechanisms have nothing to do with saving money and space. Three or four sets of rules for skirmishes and such would have been much more to the point. Card figures are a fine way to build cheap armies--but a few template figures to be photo-copied would have actually saved money. They aren't in here. There are lots of projects requiring a good wood shop, with diagrams. If you're that good and have the tools, sell boards and stowage to other wargamers, and use the profits to buy figures and terrain.
Talk to your fellow gamers, check on-line. If there's a second edition, I'll consider it--but I'll look before I buy. Dickie has done some good work. This isn't up to his standard.
Fek
Iain Dickie is a genius. He has written a book that is clearly aimed at people who are new to wargaming yet and while staying true to this, has penned a manual that has something for all wargamers.
This book reads like a fireside chat from your father or grandfather and, in similar manner, you will find yourself agreeing with some sentiments and not with others, but nonetheless respecting the author of them all (hopefully!).
The book is enjoyable and easy to read. From the outset Dickie's use of humour ensures that it is taken in the right frame of mind. His witty asides include warnings about going into garden (p 55), his quip about using foam hills for a pillow (p 68), his advice to cut insulation foam in someone else's house (p 68) and warning to keep plaster glue away from the carpet because you'll be "decidedly unpopular" as it is "not on the insurance" (p 69).
Throughout the book Dickie remains true to the idea of wargaming on a budget, giving the reader numerous ideas of how to beg, borrow, re-use, improvise and recycle materials for numerous uses associated with our hobby.
The book is packed full of useful tips. For example making a wall plug from a piece of wood rather than using a plastic wall plug--either I was not told this one by my grandfather or have forgotten; or perhaps just did not listen properly! "Measure twice so do not have to cut twice". Making a wargames table from scratch using an old bed or a table as a base. Painting the table as sea so that it will be available for any naval wargames (since in usual circumstances it will be covered with terrain and a cloth, terrain squares or the like). Ideas for making trees, bushes and hills from materials that are easily obtained and the `stability test' of terrain which is such an elegantly simple, practical idea.
Iain Dickie extends his budget theme to choosing an army, suggesting that the choice be made such that the army may be used across multiple eras or campaigns. Such an army, he says, presents "excellent value". He presents a number of suggestions for games that require few figures, or perhaps none at all. This will appeal not only to the budget conscious but also to those keen to try some new eras, aspects or approaches.
The many examples throughout the book are described clearly, step by step, with accompanying black and white drawings and/or photos. The pictures are similar to the real and realistic ones that adorned the magazine Miniature Wargames which he formerly edited (and which I always preferred to the glossier, over-produced photos in other mags). Following his advice you'll soon be producing functional terrain pieces that look good without being works of art.
After reading this book I am now regularly using lego supports in place of jars, books or cans for figures that I have altered to rest on or against while the glue dries. I also have a growing store of `flocking' material of various hues obtained by drying tea from tea bags, leaf tea and coffee grounds. Thanks heaps Mr Dickie.