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by Scott Mark Kenworthy

Download The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism, and Society after 1825 (A Woodrow Wilson Center Book) fb2
Author: Scott Mark Kenworthy
ISBN: 0199736138
Language: English
Pages: 544 pages
Category: World
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 5, 2010)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: txt lit mbr lrf
FB2 size: 1707 kb | EPUB size: 1827 kb | DJVU size: 1232 kb
Sub: History

Woodrow Wilson Center Press with Oxford University Press, 2010. Scott Kenworthy’s The Heart of Russia is a truly impressive book.

Woodrow Wilson Center Press with Oxford University Press, 2010. ISBN: 978-0-19-973613-3. Scott Mark Kenworthy is assistant professor of comparative religion at Miami University, Ohio. Epic in scale and meticulous in its use of a wide and rich primary-source base, the book bears on many important questions in modern Russian history and modern history in genera. t should shape the study of Russian Christianity-and hopefully contribute to the study of modern Christianity more broadly-for many decades to come.

Scott Kenworthy, Associate Professor, Department of. .Woodrow Wilson Presidential Memorial Exhibit and Learning Center

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Memorial Exhibit and Learning Center. The Wilson Quarterly. Visit The Wilson Quarterly. The initial decline of monasticism occurred in the latter half of the 18th century under Catherine II. Reforms of monasticism stemmed from the policies of Catherine’s predecessor, Peter the Great, who strove for the modernization of Russia.

Series: A Woodrow Wilson Center Book. Hardcover: 544 pages.

Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Scott Kenworthy’s The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism . Perhaps the greatest success of Kenworthy’s book is its skillful synthesis of a moving human narrative with meticulously evaluated social historical data.

Scott Kenworthy’s The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism and Society after 1825 is a remarkable achievement and a welcome addition to the historiography of late imperial Russian Christianity and its intersections with society and politics.

The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism, and Society after 1825 (A Woodrow Wilson Center Book) Format: Hardcover Authors: Scott Mark Kenworthy ISBN10: 0199736138 Published: 2010-12-05 In the 1830s and 1840s, increasing numbers of Russians renounced th.

The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism, and Society after 1825 (A Woodrow Wilson Center Book) Format: Hardcover Authors: Scott Mark Kenworthy ISBN10: 0199736138 Published: 2010-12-05 In the 1830s and 1840s, increasing numbers of Russians renounced the modernized, secularized, Westernized Russia created by Peter the Great in an effort to revive alternative lifestyles based on Orthodox spirituality and. values

Mining of refractory clays at Latnenskoe deposit has been described. The first lot of refractory clay was supplied to Germany in 1891. Expensive refractories were supplied from Germany to Russia.

Mining of refractory clays at Latnenskoe deposit has been described. Then mining of the clays was expanded. In 1930s and 1940s the excavating machines were used.

Recommend this journal.

Late Modern European The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism, and Sodety after 1825. The Heart of Russia is a thorough study of books and documents related to the nineteenth-century expansion of activity at Trinity-Sergius, the celebrated monastic complex located approximately fifty miles north-north east of Moscow.

By Scott M. Kenworthy. Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.

The Heart of Russia: Trinity-Sergius, Monasticism, and Society after 1825. By Scott M.

In the 1830s and 1840s, increasing numbers of Russians renounced the modernized, secularized, Westernized Russia created by Peter the Great in an effort to revive alternative lifestyles based on Orthodox spirituality and values. This effort found expression in a revival of monasticism that began in the era of Nicholas I and would last for the duration of the imperial period, brought to an end only by the cataclysm of revolution and repression of the new Bolshevik regime. Suppressed by the communists, Russian monasticism experienced another revival in the post-World War II era and again in the post-Soviet period, demonstrating that the impulse to renounce the contemporary world for the cloister is a central pattern of Russian religiosity. This book is the first comprehensive analysis of these monastic revivals, presenting a fundamentally new picture of religion in modern Russia. Scott Kenworthy's approach is that of a contextualized microhistory: an in-depth study of one monastic complex, framed within research on monasticism more broadly. The case study here is Russia's largest and most famous monastery, the Trinity-Sergius Lavra in Sergiev Posad, near Moscow. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Russian Orthodox Church is again experiencing a revival, and monasticism is playing a central role in this resurgence. In the search to recover the past, Russian Orthodox are turning to the nineteenth century revival as a normative model. Numerous Russians are once again renouncing the contemporary world--in this case, both the socialist past and the post-socialist capitalist present--and opting for a mode of life that represents a return to past values. Monasteries are again foci of popular piety as well as of important publishing activities, and their spirituality is regarded as the purest expression of Orthodox ideals. This book provides an essential basis for understanding Orthodoxy in its historical context and its contemporary manifestations.