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by Barbara Evans Clements

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Author: Barbara Evans Clements
ISBN: 0253000971
Language: English
Pages: 416 pages
Category: World
Publisher: Indiana University Press (June 29, 2012)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: lit lrf lrf mbr
FB2 size: 1388 kb | EPUB size: 1149 kb | DJVU size: 1240 kb
Sub: History

This history by Barbara Evans Clements represents a significant achievement in scholarship on Russian women and gender.

This history by Barbara Evans Clements represents a significant achievement in scholarship on Russian women and gender. Slavic and East European Journal).

Home Browse Books Book details, A History of Women in Russia: From Earliest. A History of Women in Russia: From Earliest Times to the Present. By Barbara Evans Clements. Synthesizing several decades of scholarship by historians East and West, Barbara Evans Clements traces the major developments in the history of women in Russia and their impact on the history of the nation.

Barbara Evans Clements. A history of women in russia. From earliest times to the present. To my mother, Champe Winston Evans. 1915–91), a widow who worked the double shift in the days of Leave It to Beaver. A good wife is more precious than jewels. Their lives across the centuries deserve telling, from the earliest times to the most recent, so this book begins with the Rus of the tenth century and ends in the present day. It concentrates on the Russians, Ukrainians, Belarusians, Poles, Lithuanians, Estonians, Latvians, and Jews who made up the great majority of the population. Synthesizing several decades of scholarship by historians East and West, Barbara Evans Clements traces the major developments in the history of women in Russia and their impact on the history of the nation

Barbara Alpern Engel recently wrote Women in Russia 1700-2000, which sought to achieve Clements' goal of presenting a concise and general history of the topic.

Barbara Alpern Engel recently wrote Women in Russia 1700-2000, which sought to achieve Clements' goal of presenting a concise and general history of the topic. Clements has only "added" an earlier time frame, a brief discussion of non-European women, and individual perspectives of selected, high-profile women. The book's structure is temporal, with eight chapters beginning in the year 900 and ending in 2010. Each chapter has several subsections that include law, economics, different classes, culture, and politics.

by Barbara Evans Clements. A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 Synthesizing several decades of scholarship by historians East and West, Barbara Evans Clements traces the major developments in the history of women in Russia and their impact on the history of the nation.

Mobile version (beta). Barbara Evans Clements. Download (epub, . 6 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Published by: Indiana University Press

Barbara Evans Clements. Published by: Indiana University Press. Synthesizing several decades of scholarship by historians East and West, Barbara Evans Clements traces the major developments in the history of women in Russia and their impact on the history of the nation

Barbara Evans Clements.

Synthesizing several decades of scholarship by historians East and West, Barbara Evans Clements traces the major developments in the history of women in Russia and their impact on the history of the nation. Sketching lived experiences across the centuries, she demonstrates the key roles that women played in shaping Russia's political, economic, social, and cultural development for over a millennium. The story Clements tells is one of hardship and endurance, but also one of achievement by women who, for example, promoted the conversion to Christianity, governed estates, created great art, rebelled against the government, established charities, built the tanks that rolled into Berlin in 1945, and flew the planes that strafed the retreating Wehrmacht. This daunting and complex history is presented in an engaging survey that integrates this scholarship into the field of Russian and post-Soviet history.

Comments (7)
Meztihn
What an accomplishment! In concise and lyrical prose, Clements offers the reader a scrupulously researched and enjoyable history of women. I particularly admired the structure which helps the reader focus on key aspects of women's lives in each period, and the fascinating vignettes of both famous and unheralded women. This book would be as welcome in an English classroom as an example of excellent academic style as it would in a history class or even a high level book group.
Raniconne
A great resource addition to my library for grad school. Very informative resource material that will aid in my MA thesis.
Cordantrius
This book is interesting to read and contains much information, not only about Russian women but about Russia in general. Particularly engaging for the reader are the women's short biographies, with illustrations, that accompany the main text. General readers, those involved in Russian studies, and students of women's history will all find enlightenment as well as pleasure in reading this book.
Risa
So often, women are missing from history books. Thank you, Barbara Clements, for telling the stories of these formidable and courageous Slavic women.
Frith Maier, MA, Russian Studies
Author, Trekking in Russia & Central Asia; Editor, Vagabond Life: The Caucasus Journals of George Kennan
Kirizius
This ambitious and well-written synthesis covers the history of women in Russia for over ten centuries. Sensitive to the ethnic diversity of women in Russia (this is neither a book about "Russian" women, nor does the book assume that non-Russian women are "Russian," as some reviewers curiously assert),this book places women at the center of the political, social, and economic history of the Russian and Soviet empires. it concludes with a chapter on the roles of women in the post-Soviet successor states. Deeply conversant with the best scholarship in women's history, Clements illuminates how the history of women underscores Russian peculiarities, as well as Russia's connections to Europe as a whole.
Jugami
Useful for college classrooms as well as for the general reader, this book provides valuable insights to the daily lives of women in the geographical area of utmost interest to the US over the past generations. How many of the critics here cracked the book and appreciated its nuances and illustrations of lives that would otherwise be lost to history? (Several of them didn't even get the author's name or title right.) "A History of Women in Russia" fills a long-empty gap in college curricula, but also makes for entertaining and insightful reading for a general audience. Brava!
Skrimpak
I can see that a number of reviewers rant about the book cover which uses a picture of Ukraine's prime-minister Yulia Tymoshenko and Princess Olha of Kyiv Rus', whose connection to "Russia" can also be disputed in most serious terms. The book, however, has many more problems than that, presenting a poor summary of secondary literature and making next to no contribution to the existing research (even if we limit that research to the publications available in English). Being the largest country in the world, Russia is indeed populated by a good hundred of peoples, mainly in the non-European part of the country - some of them are still preserving elements of tribal life, others form Muslim and Old religion communities. Very little is written about those women and it is a pity that the author contributes to the marginalization of the women who do not belong to the titular nation of the European part of Russia, presenting the story of East European women and the women of other post-Soviet republic as that of the history of women in Russia. Such an oversight could have been understood a century ago, but cannot be acceptable in an academic publication in this day and time.

In addition, to include separate examples of the life of Ukrainian, Polish, and Uzbek women into the history of women in Russia is not only politically scandalous, because offensive to independent states today, it creates a false representation of the history of women in East-Central Europe and Central Asia. Yes, those women happened to live on the territories colonized by the Moscow/Russian Empire or the Soviet Union at certain periods of time, but their history starts before that and continues after, it also develops under many other regional and local influences and cannot be bucketed into the narrative about the life of Russian women of the ruling nation. Those inclusions only steal the space that could have been used for a good discussion of women's lives in Russia as such. An open comparison (rather than conflation) of the status of women and the development of women's movement in Russia with the situation in the neighboring countries could have told us a lot about the life of women in Russia and about Russian history. But you won't find it in this book.

The book is a real disappointment and is not worth the money or time. Absolutely any book on the history of women of East-Central Europe or Russia written after 1991 is a better choice.