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by Joseph Pearce

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Author: Joseph Pearce
ISBN: 1586170775
Language: English
Pages: 425 pages
Category: World
Publisher: Ignatius Pr; 1st edition (April 1, 2005)
Rating: 4.7
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FB2 size: 1278 kb | EPUB size: 1815 kb | DJVU size: 1491 kb
Sub: History

Literary Giants, Literary Catholics, published by Ignatius Press, by the traditional Catholic convert and apologist Joseph Pearce, consists of essays on a variety of topics dealing with Catholic culture and the primary literary figures involved in the Catholic revival which were originally.

These essays focus on Catholic writers and thinkers who incorporated their Catholic beliefs into their art and writings and sought to defend the tradition of the Church against modernity.

Literary Giants, Literary Catholics book. Let us look at an interesti ENGLISH: An excellent collection of short articles by Pearce about the main English catholic writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: John Henry Newman, Oscar Wilde, Robert Hugh Benson, the Chesterbelloc (. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc), Maurice Baring, Evelyn Waugh, Roy Campbell, Graham Greene, . Tolkien, and many more.

Somehow it is considered impolite or indecorous to broach either topic in a social setting cends to the level of the banal.

Somehow it is considered impolite or indecorous to broach either topic in a social setting cends to the level of the banal or the profane. Thankfully, this social stricture has been wholeheartedly ignored by the key literary figures of the past century.

Literary Giants Literary Catholics. British author Joseph Pearce has firmly established himself as the premier literary biographer of our time, especially in interpreting the spiritual depths of the Catholic literary tradition. In this book, Pearce examines a plethora of authors, taking the reader through a dazzling tour of the creative landscape of Catholic prose and poetry. Literary Giants, Literary Catholics covers the vast terrain from Dante to Tolkien, from Shakespeare to Waugh.

25. EVELYN WAUGH. Waugh’s own conversion from the absurd caricature of ultramodernity to the real world of Catholic orthodoxy was greeted with astonishment by the literary world and caused a sensation in the media.

Literary Giants, Literary Catholics covers the vast terrain from Dante to Tolkien, from Shakespeare to Waugh. Focusing on the literary revival of the 20th century, Joseph Pearce touches on well-known authors like . Tolkien, but also introduces readers to lesser-known writers like Roy Campell, Maurice Baring, and Owen Barfield. Anyone who appreciates English literature will be entranced by the wealth and depth of this new masterpiece.

Download books for free. Literary Giants - Literary Catholics.

In Catholic Literary Giants, Joseph Pearce takes the reader on a dazzling tour of the creative landscape of Catholic prose and poetry. Covering the vast and impressive terrain from Dante to Tolkien, from Shakespeare to Waugh, this book is an immersion into the spiritual depths of the Catholic literary tradition with one of today's premier literary biographers as our guide. Focusing especially on the literary revival of the twentieth century, Pearce explores well-known authors such as . Chesterton, Graham Greene and .

Joseph Pearce has authored biographies of literary figures, including The Quest for Shakespeare, Tolkien: Man and Myth, The Unmasking of Oscar Wilde, C. S. Lewis and The Catholic Church, Literary Converts. Lewis and The Catholic Church, Literary Converts, Wisdom and Innocence: A Life of . Chesterton, Solzhenitsyn: A Soul in Exile and Old Thunder: A Life of Hilaire Belloc. His books have been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, Italian, Korean, Mandarin, Croatian, and Polish. Pearce's conversion to Catholicism was influenced by the writer G. K. Chesterton.

Автор: Pearce Joseph Название: Catholic Literary Giants: A. .Tolkien had no more than seven books published during his lifetime, yet he became a towering literary figure round the world.

Описание: Joseph Pearce takes a controversial approach to Tolkien's imaginative literature.

British author Joseph Pearce has firmly established himself as the premier literary biographer of our time, especially in interpreting the spiritual depths of the Catholic literary tradition. In this new book, Pearce examines a plethora of authors, taking the reader through a dazzling tour of the creative landscape of Catholic prose and poetry. Literary Giants, Literary Catholics covers the vast terrain from Dante to Tolkien, from Shakespeare to Waugh.

Focusing on the literary revival of the 20th century, Joseph Pearce touches on well-known authors like G.K. Chesterton and J.R.R. Tolkien, but also introduces readers to lesser-known writers like Roy Campell, Maurice Baring, and Owen Barfield. Anyone who appreciates English literature will be entranced by the wealth and depth of this new masterpiece.

Comments (7)
Stick
I usually like Pearce; his books are well researched and interesting,but this one just didn't do it for me - it was the oddest thing,whichever writer he was discussing,he attempted to emulate their writing style;the most glaring failure of this was when he tried to wordplay with paradox in imitation of Chesterton and Chesterton has no equal.
Mushicage
Please excuse me my bad English; I can read well but it's difficult for me to write. In spite of this, I am very pleased to comment this book, so interesting for me as all the Pearce's things. This book in particular permitted me to read a lot of otherwise out of my reach articles, published in magazines, etc. It's so a broad vision of the more important authors of the literary catholic revival in last century, with some pleasant surprises, such as the intelligent observations about one of the Beatles!!!, that much increased the interest and respect for Pearce in my elder son. I am really delighted.
Akta
Very informative.
Faell
There are books that are like doors that let you into another world. And there are books that open doors to other doors--this is a book that has opened other doors to me - new and beautiful authors and journeys into other worlds that I'd never heard about. There is so much history, knowledge, fun and faith that I have missed in my life. Thank you, Joseph Pearce!
Ironrunner
A well written compilation of all the great turn of the century Catholic writers. A valuable addition to my library.
Whilingudw
great condition and wonderful reading. Wish I could say more, but haven't yet begun to read this "another fabulous read by Joseph Pearce.
Whitecaster
_Literary Giants, Literary Catholics_, published by Ignatius Press, by the traditional Catholic convert and apologist Joseph Pearce, consists of essays on a variety of topics dealing with Catholic culture and the primary literary figures involved in the Catholic revival which were originally published in various journals and especially in the _Saint Austin Review_. These essays focus on Catholic writers and thinkers who incorporated their Catholic beliefs into their art and writings and sought to defend the tradition of the Church against modernity. Joseph Pearce, a convert to Catholicism, regards himself to be a "cultural apologist" as opposed to a theologian or an apologist who relies strictly on rational arguments to defend the faith.

This book covers a wide variety of topics all dealing with the Catholic literary revival. The book begins by discussing this revival among the Victorians including the romantic movement influenced by Coleridge and Woodsworth, the traditionalist revolution in Anglicanism led by Cardinal Newman (who eventually converted to Roman Catholicism), and the art of the pre-Raphaelites. In addition, the Catholic revival came to effect the Decadents, who sought God in their own way as a means to overcome sin by facing the darkness, including Baudelaire, Huysmans, and Wilde (all of whom converted to Catholicism). Throughout this discussion, the relationship between tradition and conversion is explained. Pearce also discusses the role of tradition in modern English literature including T. S. Eliot, Evelyn Waugh, and Siegfried Sassoon. The second section of this book is devoted to essays featuring the apologetic duo, Hilaire Belloc and G. K. Chesterton (nicknamed "the Chesterbelloc" by George Bernard Shaw). Pearce shows how Roman Catholicism came to play an important part in the life of Chesterton who eventually converted. The writings of Belloc and Chesterton are both highly apologetic in nature and both focus on the economic theory of distributism, based on the social teachings of the Catholic church. Distributism provides a third way alternative to the excesses of both socialism and capitalism and is in agreement with the encyclical _Rerum Novarum_ of Pope Leo XIII. Pearce presents several interesting essays focusing on both Chesterton and Belloc, including an essay where he argues that both would oppose the modern European Union (contrary to the suggestion of another writer) and in which he exonerates Chesterton of the fascism smear (distributism being fundamentally and diametrically opposed to fascist statism). Essays on Maurice Baring, R. H. Benson, Maisie Ward, and John Seymour are also presented. The third section of this book deals with "the wasteland", particularly the aftermath of the First World War and the despair which followed. Pearce discusses poets who opposed the horrors of mass warfare including Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen. Pearce also discusses the modernism versus traditionalism at the root of T. S. Eliot and his epic poem _The Wasteland_ as well as the influence of Dante on Eliot. Pearce also discusses the modernist turned Catholic writer Evelyn Waugh as well as Roy Campbell who came to embrace Catholicism in Spain. The fourth section of this book is devoted to J. R. R. Tolkien and "the Inklings". Pearce discusses the Inklings including Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, and Charles Williams as well as the role of Christian orthodoxy in their writings. Tolkien's _Lord of the Rings_ trilogy presents a profoundly Catholic and Christian epic which has lent itself to many different allegorical interpretations. Indeed, the role that a "true North" as opposed to a false "Protestant" North plays in Tolkien's work is fully explained by Pearce. Finally, the fifth section of this book includes essays of a miscellaneous sort. These include essays discussing the Decadent path to Christ through darkness and sin as well as discussions of Oscar Wilde. Pearce argues that Wilde, who is perhaps most well known for the scandal that grew out of his homosexuality, had always had a profound love for the Catholic church leading to his eventual conversion towards the end of his life. According to Pearce, Wilde has been misunderstood as a proponent of homosexual rights, instead of properly understood as a man who sought peace and regarded his homosexuality as a sickness. Pearce also discusses Hollywood, both as a source of evil and as having the potential to do good, particularly noting the recent films _The Lord of the Rings_ and Mel Gibson's _The Passion of Christ_. Pearce also discusses poetry, including both Dante and Shakespeare (both of whom may have been Catholics). In addition, Pearce discusses the Catholicism and mystique of Salavador Dali, whose surreal paintings were underlain with Christian imagery. Pearce ends by dedicating an essay to the late Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, by providing a biographical piece detailing his own conversion from a militant anti-Catholic to the faith, and by ending with an essay on the Christmas season.

This book presents an important contribution to the study of Catholic literature. It provides not only an opportunity to study the faith through the works of some of this century's greatest writers, thinkers, and artists, but also with a unique selection of essays that enable one to see the true beauty that is the Catholic church.
I enjoyed learning about all the Catholic literary figures of this era. However, this book was supremely repetitive, the sections on Chesterton and Tolkien especially so. It seems as if Pearce took a compilation of essays and articles he wrote and put them together in this book, with little help from an editor to tell him that many of his essays have very similar themes. I wanted to enjoy this book so much, but really as a Catholic man of literature Pearce should have known better.