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by Richard John Neuhaus

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Author: Richard John Neuhaus
ISBN: 0802849059
Language: English
Pages: 138 pages
Category: World
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.; Second Printing edition (April 18, 2001)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: doc rtf lit lrf
FB2 size: 1999 kb | EPUB size: 1504 kb | DJVU size: 1495 kb
Sub: History

Richard John Neuhaus (May 14, 1936 – January 8, 2009) was a prominent Christian cleric (first in the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod . The Best of the Public Square: Book 2 (2001).

Richard John Neuhaus (May 14, 1936 – January 8, 2009) was a prominent Christian cleric (first in the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod, then ELCA pastor and later as a Roman Catholic priest) and writer. Born in Canada, Neuhaus moved to the United States where he became a naturalized United States citizen.

Neuhaus, Richard John. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

10 brief portraits of people who defined each century of the second millennium . Richard John Neuhaus was a prominent Christian cleric (first as a Lutheran pastor and later as a Roman Catholic priest) and writer. Some were better than others. All of them could use footnotes. Oct 31, 2011 vittore paleni rated it liked it. a few essays are great and insightful others not so much. well worth a read for the ten sketches it offers. Especially enjoyed the essays on Gregory the VII, Columbus, Pascal and Rousseau.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Second One Thousand Years: Ten People . Richard John Neuhaus. It might as well be admitted. the dawning of a new millennium was something of a letdown for most people.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Second One Thousand Years: Ten People Who. The Second One Thousand Years: Ten People Who Defined a Millennium. By Richard John Neuhaus. More precisely, it was not a letdown because they were never very excited about it in the first place. There is the factor that two-thirds of the world is outside the orbit of what some persist in calling Christian civilization, and the idea of a third millennium is undeniably Christian in origin.

Richard John Neuhaus.

Written by a team of renowned scholars, the book treats the second millennium century by century, choosing one historical figure as the prism through which to view each period.

com's Richard John Neuhaus Author Page. The Second One Thousand Years: Ten People Who Defined a Millennium Apr 18, 2001.

Richard John Neuhaus (May 14, 1936 – January 8, 2009) was a prominent Christian cleric (first in the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod .

Informationen zum Titel The Second One Thousand Years .

Informationen zum Titel The Second One Thousand Years This book by a stellar group of scholars provides a fascinating look at the religious and social history of the West over the past one thousand years. The contributors each write about a key individual from each century of the second millennium–Gregory VII, Maimonides, Aquinas, Dante, Columbus, Calvin, Pascal, Rousseau, Lincoln, and John Paul II–treating these pivotal figures as prisms through which to see their times. As I Lay Dying Richard Neuhaus, Richard John Neuhaus Basic Books, 2003 .

Ten People Who Defined a Millennium. Published April 2001 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. EVERY MARKING OF TIME has an arbitrariness about it, yet there seems to be something so large in its proportions about the commencement of a year that begins a century that inaugurates a millennium that it beguiles otherwise reasonable folk to imagine they are prophets.

The story of the last millennium is, in largest part, the story of the rise of the Christian West. This fascinating book, assembled by the editors of the journal First Things, explores the religious and social development of the West during the past one thousand years by looking at ten people who defined the millennium. Written by a team of renowned scholars, the book treats the second millennium century by century, choosing one historical figure as the prism through which to view each period. While the individuals chosen are not necessarily "representative" figures--in some instances they are people who opposed the "spirit of the times"--the compelling personalities limned in these chapters help us to understand better where we have come so far. Insightful, authoritative, and a pleasure to read, these narratives not only open intriguing windows on key dimensions of the Christian West but also provide a panoramic view from which to comprehend all of modern history--a view well worth pondering as we begin the third one thousand years.
Comments (3)
Freaky Hook
Ok but not easy reading. Abraham Lincoln was the only one I could really relate to.
MrCat
This is the most interesting book on history I have ever read. Previously, I viewed history as useless or worse: second-rate minds pushing bad ideas. This helped me see it as series of great thinkers laying the foundation for the much better world I now enjoy.

The editor collected ten authors and set the challenge. For each century, choose a man whose ideas embody the era. Tell us what he did and how he changed the world. These are not necessarily the most important people, certainly not the most powerful. They do each represent an important idea.

The book is not at all religious. Neither is it hostile to religion. The spiritual motivation of each century's hero is shown. The result is respectful of Catholics, Protestants and Jews.

The men chosen for each century
1000's - Gregory VII – limits of church and state power
1100's - Maimonides – The Jew whose intellect was at the pinnacle of the caliphate
1200's – Aquinas – The dumb ox who laid the foundation for medieval university thought
1300's – Dante: A Party of One
1400's – Columbus and the Beginning of the World
1500's – Calvin and the Christian Calling
1600's – Pascal: The First Modern Christian
1700's – Rousseau and the Revolt Against Reason
1800's – Abraham Lincoln and the Last Best Hope
1900's – John Paul II and the Crisis of Humanism

It's wrong to pick favourites but the ones I most remember are Pope Gregory who defined the boundaries of church and state and John Calvin, the classical humanist. Calvin is, of course, a religious figure but this book focuses on his secular impact. Is there any one more influential in our modern economy?
hulk
Composed promptly after the hoopla over the millenium, this book sought to distinguish one individual from each century with an essay chosen by the editors of "First Things."

Richard John Neuhaus in writing the preface poignantly comments on how there was not much excitement here in the US outside of Y2K and the Roman Catholic church's Jubilee celebration.

Further RC influence shows up in selecting many from the world of philosophy (Aquinas, Dante, Rosseau, Maimonides) and two popes (John Paul II and Gregory VII). Throw in a Spanish RC backed explorer Columbus, and John Calvin and Abaraham Lincoln and you've got it. Pascal was an excellent choice which goes against this trend, and the article is absolutely marvelous, with quotes such as "Equally dangerous for man to know God without knowing his own wretchedness, and to know his wretchedness without knowing the Redeemer who can cure him of it."

I truly question the selection of the current pope and Calvin. The editors show their bias towards social/political activism in these choices.

The essays are well written and informative even if one questions their century hero.