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by Mark Edele

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Author: Mark Edele
ISBN: 0199237565
Language: English
Pages: 348 pages
Category: Military
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 29, 2009)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: doc mobi lrf rtf
FB2 size: 1954 kb | EPUB size: 1618 kb | DJVU size: 1470 kb
Sub: History

Millions of Soviet soldiers died in the USSR's struggle for survival against Nazi Germany but millions more returned to Stalin's state after victory.

Millions of Soviet soldiers died in the USSR's struggle for survival against Nazi Germany but millions more returned to Stalin's state after victory. Mark Edele traces the veterans' story from the early post-war years through to the end of the Soviet Union in 1991. He describes in detail the problems they encountered during demobilization, the dysfunctional bureaucracy they had to deal with once back, and the way their reintegration into civilian life worked inpractice in one of the most devastated countries of Europe.

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Mark Edele traces the veterans' story from the early post-war years through to the end of the Soviet Union in 1991. He describes in detail the problems they encountered during demobilization, the dysfunctional bureaucracy they had to deal with once back, and the way their reintegration into civilian life worked in practice in one of the most devastated countries of Europe. He pays particular attention to groups with specific problems such as the disabled, former prisoners of war, women soldiers, and youth. These preconceptions were overcome only after a long, hard struggle by a popular movement that slowly emerged within the strict confines of the authoritarian Soviet regime.

Oxford University Press. It is understandable why the Soviet authorities would be nervous about the demobilization of their victorious armed forces at the conclusion of the Great Patriotic War. There were vast numbers involved, as many as 25 million. There would be plenty of evidence of the relative material abundance of the outside world given the quantities of the spoils of war transported back into the Soviet Union and sold at numerous markets. There were also expectations of a better life after the sacrifices of 1941–5.

Mark Edele has penned a superb book that traces 'the rise of veterans as a new social group and political force in Soviet society' to the end of the USSR itself and is a must read for anyone interested in Soviet history

Mark Edele has penned a superb book that traces 'the rise of veterans as a new social group and political force in Soviet society' to the end of the USSR itself and is a must read for anyone interested in Soviet history.

Discover more publications, questions and projects in Authoritarianism. Article December 2009 · History. June 2013 · Annales Histoire Sciences Sociales. Soviet Veterans of the Second World War: A Popular Movement in an Authoritarian Society, 1941-1991

May be you will be interested in other books by Mark Edele: Soviet Veterans of World War II: A Popular .

May be you will be interested in other books by Mark Edele: Soviet Veterans of World War II: A Popular Movement in an Authoritarian Society, 1941-­1991 by Mark Edele. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Mark Edele. Title: Soviet Veterans of World War II: A Popular Movement in an Authoritarian Society, 1941-­1991. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Books ~~ History~~ Europe ~~ Former Soviet Republics.

This book explores the fate of the millions of Soviet soldiers who survived the Second World War and returned to Stalin's state after victory, tracing the veterans' story from the early postwar years right through to the end of the Soviet Union in 1991. It describes in detail the problems they encountered during demobilization, the dysfunctional bureaucracy they had to deal with once back, and the way their reintegration into civilian life worked in practice in one of the most severely destroyed countries of Europe. It pays particular attention to groups with specific problems such.

See Mark Edele, Soviet Veterans of the Second World War: A Popular Movement in an Authoritarian Society. 1941–1991 (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2008), Chapter . rossRefGoogle Scholar. 16. On the cult of the war see Nina Tumarkin, The Living & the Dead. The Rise and Fall of the Cult of World War II in Russia (New York: Basic Books, 1994);Google Scholar. Bernd Bonwetsch, ‘Ich habe an einem völlig anderen Krieg teilgenommen. Die Erinnerung an den ‘Großen Vaterländischen Krieg’ in der Sowjetunion, in: Krieg und Erinnerung. Fallstudien zum 19. und 20. Jahrhundert, ed.

Edele, Mark, Soviet Veterans of the Second World War. A Popular Movement in an Authoritarian Society . A Popular Movement in an Authoritarian Society, 1941-1991. Oxford University Press 2008. Scheide, Carmen (2011). Edele, Mark, Soviet Veterans of the Second World War. Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas, 59(1), pp. 111-112. Interest & Impact. 0 since deposited on 05 Mar 2018 0 in the past 12 months.

Millions of Soviet soldiers died in the "war of annihilation" against Nazi Germany but millions more returned to Stalin's state after victory. Mark Edele traces the veterans' story from the early post-war years through to the end of the Soviet Union in 1991. He describes in detail the problems they encountered during demobilization, the dysfunctional bureaucracy they had to deal with once back, and the way their reintegration into civilian life worked in practice in one of the most devastated countries of Europe. He pays particular attention to groups with specific problems such as the disabled, former prisoners of war, women soldiers, and youth. The study analyses the old soldiers' long struggle for recognition and the eventual emergence of an organized movement in the years after Stalin's death. The Soviet state at first refused to recognize veterans as a group worthy of special privileges or as an organization. They were not a group conceived of in Marxist-Leninist theory, there was suspicion about their political loyalty, and the leadership worried about the costs of affording a special status to such a large population group. These preconceptions were overcome only after a long, hard struggle by a popular movement that slowly emerged within the strict confines of the authoritarian Soviet regime.