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by Sharon Squassoni,Phillip Margulies

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Author: Sharon Squassoni,Phillip Margulies
ISBN: 0816072116
Language: English
Pages: 355 pages
Category: Military
Publisher: Facts on File; Annotated edition edition (June 1, 2008)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: mobi docx azw lrf
FB2 size: 1390 kb | EPUB size: 1751 kb | DJVU size: 1878 kb
Sub: History

Nuclear Nonproliferation book. Published June 1st 2008 by Facts on File. Nuclear Nonproliferation (Global Issues).

Nuclear Nonproliferation book. 0816072116 (ISBN13: 9780816072118).

Nuclear nonproliferation. Phillip Margulies ; foreword by Sharon Squassoni. Focus on the United States and Russia. United States documents. Key players A to Z. Organizations and agencies.

In December 2002, North Korea ended the 8-year freeze on its nuclear program by expelling international inspectors and restarting plutonium production facilities. In 2005, North Korea announced that it had nuclear weapons and that it would withdraw from the Six Party talks.

Find nearly any book by Phillip Margulies . Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Colony of North Carolina (Primary Sources of the Thirteen Colonies and the Lost Colony). by Phillip Margulies.

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The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) is the core component of the global nonproliferation regime, and . Thus, even if enforcement of the existing regime were not an issue, nearly half of the world's nuclear-armed states are excluded from its provisions

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) is the core component of the global nonproliferation regime, and establishes a comprehensive, legally binding framework based on three principles: (1) states without nuclear weapons as of 1967-a year before the treaty opened for signature-agree not to acquire them; (2) the five states known to have tested nuclear weapons as of 1967-the nuclear weapon states. Thus, even if enforcement of the existing regime were not an issue, nearly half of the world's nuclear-armed states are excluded from its provisions. By design, the NPT does not address proliferation by nonstate actors.

advanced knowledge of WMD nonproliferation regimes, both global and regional. Careers in Nonproliferation, Nuclear Energy and Security Students will gain skills they can apply immediately, while you are still going to school. knowledge about peaceful uses of nuclear energy and how to minimize potential proliferation risks. familiarity with best practices in nuclear and WMD security. When students graduate from two key universities in international studies, they become part of the worldwide networks of MIIS and MGIMO alumni that will open doors wherever they go.

It addresses key issues such as concerns over rogue states and stateless rogues, delivery systems made possible by technology, and the connection between nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles, examining whether non-proliferation regimes can deal with these threats o. .

It addresses key issues such as concerns over rogue states and stateless rogues, delivery systems made possible by technology, and the connection between nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles, examining whether non-proliferation regimes can deal with these threats or whether economic or military sanctions need to be developed. It also examines the feasibility of eliminating or greatly reducing the number of nuclear weapons

History suggests that the existence of a weapon leads to its eventual use in war, as illustrated by the dropping of the atomic bomb on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. At the opening of the atomic age, scientists, political analysts, generals, and politicians were haunted by the idea that nuclear wars could not be won; both sides would be virtually destroyed. The stakes of the game have only continued to rise as the club of nations currently possessing nuclear arms has become less and less exclusive: the United States, the Soviet Union/Russia, England, France, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. Following a detailed analysis of this timely issue. Nuclear Nonproliferation explores the threat of nuclear production and the potential for solutions in four regions of the world--the United States, South Asia (India and Pakistan), the Middle East (Israel, Iraq, and Iran), and East Asia (North Korea).