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by T. R. Fehrenbach

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Author: T. R. Fehrenbach
ISBN: 0028811135
Language: English
Pages: 483 pages
Category: Military
Publisher: Potomac Books Inc. (January 31, 1995)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: doc azw lit doc
FB2 size: 1315 kb | EPUB size: 1618 kb | DJVU size: 1926 kb
Sub: History

Fehrenbach wrote This Kind of War about ten years after he served in Korea as an Army officer. Although doesn’t mention his Korean War experiences anywhere in his book, Fehrenbach’s disillusionment with how the war was fought at all levels fairly drips from each page.

Fehrenbach wrote This Kind of War about ten years after he served in Korea as an Army officer. His main criticism is that the United States was very much unprepared to fight a major land war in Asia – or anywhere else, for that matter.

This Kind of War book. Fehrenbach comes down on the side of the military, but he makes . Fehrenbach served in the Korean War as an officer in the . His experiences shaped this book

This Kind of War book. His experiences shaped this book.

This Kind of War is perhaps the best book ever written on the Korean War (John McCain, The Wall Street .

This Kind of War is perhaps the best book ever written on the Korean War (John McCain, The Wall Street Journal), the most comprehensive single-volume history of the conflict that began in 1950 and is still affecting US foreign policy.

This Kind of War. Author Biography. During World War II, . Fehrenbach served with the . Infantry and Engineers as Platoon Sergeant with the 3189th Engineer Battalion. He continued his military career in the Korean War, rising from Platoon Leader to Company Commander and then to Battalion Staff Officer of the 72nd Tank battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. He is currently a Major, Armor USAR. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the hundreds of individuals, in service or out, who contributed to this book, and to George C. Lambkin, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, who knows what a Public Information Officer should be. Without each of these, there might have been no book.

This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History.

The cover of This Kind of War is pictured. POLITICO Screen grab. Fehrenbach deplored the steep decline in .

It repeatedly refers to Puerto Ricans as a separate national group, along with Americans, Brits, Turks and others in the United Nations force in Korea. The cover of This Kind of War is pictured. military readiness after victory was celebrated in the First and Second World Wars, and the softness and indulgence of the post-1945 liberal army.

Электронная книга "This Kind of War: The Classic Military History of the Korean War", T. R. Fehrenbach. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "This Kind of War: The Classic Military History of the Korean War" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The book that former Defense Secretary James Mattis recommends as America faces the threat of conflict with North Korea. and North Korea, as President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un exchange barbs and the threat of a nuclear conflict looms, Mattis responded to a question on how best to avoid such a war.

The fiftieth anniversary of the Korean War makes this an appropriate time to revisit This Kind of War, the monumental study of the conflict that began in June 1950. Successive generations of U.S. military officers have considered this book an indispensable part of their education.T. R. Fehrenbach's narrative brings to life the harrowing and bloody battles that were fought up and down the Korean Peninsula. Partly drawn from official records, operations journals, and histories, it is based largely on the compelling personal narratives of the small-unit commanders and their troops. Unlike any other work on the Korean War, it provides a clear panoramic view, sharp insight into the successes and failures of U.S. forces, and a riveting account of fierce clashes between U.N. troops and the North Korean and Chinese communist invaders.The lessons that Colonel Fehrenbach identifies still resonate. Severe peacetime budget cuts after World War II left the U.S. military a shadow of its former self. The terrible lesson of Korea was that to send into action troops trained for nothing but "serving a hitch" in some quiet billet was an almost criminal act. Throwing these ill-trained and poorly equipped troops into the heat of battle resulted in the war's early routs. The United States was simply unprepared for war. As we enter a new century with Americans and North Koreans continuing to face each other across the 38th parallel, we would do well to remember the price we paid during the Korean War.
Comments (7)
Goltizuru
Before this year, I knew very little about the Korean War. Now I know a lot more about what is called “the forgotten war,” thanks to two books on the subject that I’ve read over the last two months. Earlier this week, I finished “This Kind of War: The Classic Military History of the Korean War” by T.R. Fehrenbach.

Fehrenbach tells his story primarily through the perspective of the individual soldiers who fought on the front lines of the war. He describes the living hell of some of the great battles of the war, including Seoul, Osan, Inchon, Imjin River, Chosin (Changjin) Reservoir, Bloody and Heartbreak Ridges, Pork Chop Hill, and others.

Fehrenbach wrote “This Kind of War” about ten years after he served in Korea as an Army officer. Although doesn’t mention his Korean War experiences anywhere in his book, Fehrenbach’s disillusionment with how the war was fought at all levels fairly drips from each page. His main criticism is that the United States was very much unprepared to fight a major land war in Asia – or anywhere else, for that matter. The Truman Administration had spent the five years after the end of World War II gutting defense budgets, reducing military personnel levels, and depriving the armed forces of the essential equipment they needed in order to win. Soldiers – especially those stationed in Japan, the ones who would end up being sent to Korea – had lost their fighting edge due to inadequate training and soft living.

Fehrenbach brings to life many of the most famous historical events of the war, including President Harry Truman’s firing of General Douglas MacArthur, the death of General Walton Walker in a motor vehicle accident, and – most interestingly – the plight of prisoners of war (POWs) on both sides. Relying on interviews with American POWs who survived captivity, Fehrenbach paints a devastating picture of the sub-human conditions these soldiers were forced to endure. The author also gives a detailed account of the uprising in the United Nations POW camp on Koje-do Island, and how that rebellion by North Korean and Chinese prisoners was suppressed.

“This Kind of War” is an excellent account of the Korean War. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and I learned a great deal from it. Highly recommended.
Qumen
As a military history of the mid-cold war era, it is a well-written and concise history of Western (mostly American) military action in Asia. The intricacies of coupling warfare and diplomacy in Korea is heart-breaking. The forfeiture of American lives for ‘status quo ante’ is appalling.

Which brings me to my personal point: did no one who got us into Viet Nam read this book? Was nothing taught in Military Colleges about what happened? Where were the Westmoreland’s at this time? The McNamara’s? The Kennedy’s?

A land war in Asia with tenuous supply lines from the north, where people brought all equipment south by hand, foot, truck. Landscape not conducive to large scale mobilizations. An enemy that can live on 3 rice balls a day, survive hostile climates, with a feeling of righteousness.

Am I describing Korea or Viet Nam?

Sorry for the tirade. Read the book.
Super P
The book still deserves five stars based purely on content. It's a style of history writing that may strike many 21st Century Americans as preachy, grandfatherly, and stuffy. But Fehrenbach makes a decent case for his arguments and he's a first-rate writer, and his prose is quite lively. So I have no problem recommending the book, and do so with special enthusiasm either for aspiring young warriors (especially aspiring military officers) or for those interested in the history of history-writing (great insights into American thought in 1962, on the cusp of our increasing involvement in the Vietnam War).

As of January 2015, however, the Kindle e-book version of this book is HORRIBLY FORMATTED. If I had the ability to rate this book's format apart from its content, I'd give it only one star. Almost every page has formatting errors, and while they're all distracting (and eventually very annoying), some of them are impenetrably confusing, substantively obscuring the author's meaning. I don't know whether the blame is Amazon's or the publisher's -- my guess is the latter -- but whoever was responsible for proofreading the conversion of this e-book should perhaps be sentenced to at least a choice between being fired and spending a weekend in a North Korean prison camp.
MrCat
I have not read it in many years. I bought this copy to replace one I gifted to a friend. It is a good read for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics of USA and United Nations involvement in world affairs. It also provides some insight into the disastrous consequences for the those who serve their country. Throwing troops in summer uniform into lethal winder conditions, with inadequate weapons and supplies is inexcusable. As a veteran of the Vietnam conflict I am happy to say that although we did not learn all the lessons of Korea, we did, at least, take much better care of our troops.