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Download White Dreams, Black Africa: The British Antislavery Expedition to the River Niger, 1841-1842 fb2

by Howard Temperley

Download White Dreams, Black Africa: The British Antislavery Expedition to the River Niger, 1841-1842 fb2
Author: Howard Temperley
ISBN: 0300050216
Language: English
Pages: 204 pages
Category: Americas
Publisher: Yale University Press; 1st ed edition (October 23, 1991)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: lrf azw doc docx
FB2 size: 1559 kb | EPUB size: 1286 kb | DJVU size: 1908 kb
Sub: History

White Dreams, Black Africa book.

White Dreams, Black Africa book. In 1841 Britain's anti-slavery crusaders launched a civilizing.

New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1991. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

Paul E. Lovejoy, Howard Temperley. Canadian Journal of African Studies, Revue canadienne des études africaines, January 1994, JSTOR. The authors haven't finished explaining this publication. The following have contributed to this page: Professor Paul E Lovejoy. PDF generated on 22-Dec-2019 Create your own PDF summaries at ww. rowkudos.

Abolitionists & Development in 19th Century Africa. com User, February 12, 2007.

by Temperley, Howard. 8vo; Picture may not match book; ex-library markings include stamps/labels/card pocket; no DJ, if one issued; light wear/scuffing to boards/spine; head/tail/corners lightly bumped/creased; spine/edges lightly sunned/faded; text unmarked and clean.

Whatever the consequences of these attempts, British officials were keenly aware of this region’s importance to British commercial success in West Africa.

Anglo-American Anti-slavery Cooperation. Whatever the consequences of these attempts, British officials were keenly aware of this region’s importance to British commercial success in West Africa.

The British government backed the effort to make treaties with the native peoples, introduce Christianity and promote increased trade. The crews of the boats suffered a high mortality from disease.

42. Palmerston’s instructions to Beecroft, 21 February 1851, . 47. Quoted in John Darwin, Unfinished Empire: The Global Expansion of Britain (London: Penguin, 2013), 6. oogle Scholar.

In 1841 Britain's anti-slavery crusaders launched a "civilizing" expedition to the Niger, seeking to cut off the slave trade at its source and make amends for past wrongs by carrying trade, civilization and Christianity into the African heartland. This book tells the story of this bizarre and ultimately tragic expedition and its aftermath, providing the first single account since the participants published their own experiences in the 1840s. Written by a specialist on the slave trade, it not only contributes to our knowledge of Britain's humanitarian endeavour but also sheds light on the intricate politics of pre-colonial West Africa. Howard Temperley relates that with the backing of the British government, three specially designed steamers, manned by 150 Europeans and an equal number of blacks, ascended the Niger. The crew initiated anti-slavery treaties with the local rulers and soon the Europeans began to succumb to fever and were obliged to withdraw, leaving their black colleagues in charge. The following year a relief expedition found that the farm was in an area beset by tribal warfare and that the settlers had enslaved the refugees who had flooded into the settlement seeking protection. The settlers were ordered to abandon the farm, and they returned to the coast in disgrace. According to Temperley, although the Niger expedition had little effect on Africa, it did have a major impact on the attitudes of the British public. Yet, unmitigated diaster though it seemed, it served to open the way for subsequent generations of explorers, traders and empire-builders to travel to Africa.