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by Kathie Durbin

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Author: Kathie Durbin
ISBN: 0870710567
Language: English
Pages: 344 pages
Category: Americas
Publisher: Oregon State University Press; 2 edition (April 1, 2005)
Rating: 4.7
Formats: txt lrf lrf lit
FB2 size: 1714 kb | EPUB size: 1599 kb | DJVU size: 1455 kb
Sub: History

Yet the fightfor the Alaska rain forest is becoming a broader movement as appreciation for the true value of the regions's wilderness grows.

Discover the best Forests & Forestry in Best Sellers. Tongass: Pulp Politics and the Fight for the Alaska Rain Forest. Rainforest Escape: My Island Animal, Exotic Flower and Tropical Plant Color Book.

Kathie Durbin has written about forest ecology and forest politics since 1989, as a staff reporter for The Oregonian and for numerous other publications.

Set in Alaska's coastal rain forest, Tongass is a story by turns dismaying and inspiring, of greed, courage, bare-knuckles politics, and the fate of a remote, wild, beautiful land.

Forest Service map of the Tongass, with National Monuments and Wilderness Areas. Tongass: Pulp Politics and the Fight for the Alaskan Rainforest". The second contract was between the Alaska Pulp Corporation (APC) and the United States, signed in 1956, authorizing the harvest of . 75 billion board feet for the next fifty years. Both mills have been key to local economy, and were for a time the largest employer in Southeast Alaska. The funding by the United States government of the timber industry was intended as a strategy to increase the population of Southeast Alaska by creating more employment opportunities.

The story of Tongass National Forest and its great temperate rain forest is. .In her epilogue, Durbin wonders about the future of Southeast Alaska and the place of the residents in a Tongass forest that might become.

Perhaps that is what makes Tongass such an interesting book: it tells a recognizable story that does not quite fit in the customary mold. In her epilogue, Durbin wonders about the future of Southeast Alaska and the place of the residents in a Tongass forest that might become ecologically and socially sustainable.

Tongass: Pulp Politics and the Fight for the Alaska Rain Forest. Corvallis: Oregon State University Press. Anchorage, AK: Audubon Alaska and The Nature Conservancy. Investing in Habitat Improvements Vital for Ecological Sustainability, Local Economies, Subsistence Users. Alaska Region Newsletter, June.

The rain in Alaska falls mainly on the Tongass. com User, January 23, 2006

book by Kathie Durbin. The rain in Alaska falls mainly on the Tongass. com User, January 23, 2006. It's not just recently scientists and people who care about the environment have talked against clearing rain forests.

The forest is named for the Tongass group of the Tlingit people, who inhabited the southernmost areas of Southeast Alaska, near . Durbin, Kathie (1999). Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Press.

The forest is named for the Tongass group of the Tlingit people, who inhabited the southernmost areas of Southeast Alaska, near what is now the city of Ketchikan. Misty Fjords Waterfall and kayak. The Tongass includes parts of the Northern Pacific coastal forests and Pacific Coastal Mountain icefields and tundra ecoregions. Q&A with Kathie Durbin - chronicler of the struggle to preserve the Tongass (book referenced above). Ketchum, Robert Glenn (1987). The Tongass: Alaska's Vanishing Rain Forest: The Photographs of Robert Glenn Ketchum. Text by Robert Glenn Ketchum and Carey D. Ketchum; introduction by Roderick Nash. New York, New York: Aperture Foundation. Temperate Rainforests of the North Pacific Coast. Audubon Alaska: Tongass National Forest.

After World War II, the U.S. government lured two pulp companies to Southeast Alaska by promising them low-cost timber from the Tongass National Forest, the planet's largest coastal temperate rain forest. The mills brought jobs and growth to a sparsely settled region. They also wreaked ecological havoc and created a timber industry that broke labor unions, drove competitors out of business, and controlled politicians and the U.S. Forest Service. It took a national campaign, led by grassroots environmentalists, to bring sanity and sustainability to management of the Tongass.In her account of Alaska's era of pulp, Durbin draws on the voices of the people most affected: independent loggers who fought back when the pulp companies conspired to drive them out of business, courageous biologists who warned that logging was destroying critical fish and wildlife habitat, Tlingit Indians who saw their traditional hunting grounds vanish, young activists and lawyers who found their lives transformed by the battle for the Alaska rain forest.
Comments (7)
Steelcaster
Journalist Kathie Durbin has written one of the finest investigative works that I have read. I'm a lawyer with biology and chemistry degrees and I find the extensive endnotes, legal references and her penchant to seek out and cite primary sources refreshing.
There is nothing here that supports any label of the author, save that of professional. This work has disturbed me for years. I have become more active in the fight to preserve the ONLY temperate rain forest left in North America because of her clear and concise use of well-supported facts.
The most disturbing fact not in the book is that the lumber industry is now nothing but a byproduct of the pulp industry.
Ms. Durbin shows us how Salmon spawning grounds destroyed out of greed and carelessness by logging right up to the spawning streams and destroying the shade that the Salmon's Redd's require, and by the disposal of low pH waste into bays and estuaries and by the effects of runoff from clearcuts (damaging sub-arctic land and water: a fragile environment, indeed).
There is no room to debate the facts...only the policy. Calling this work or its author names simply illustrates the old adage: if you can't win on the facts attack the fact-finder.
Read this book. ANWAR may be the cause celeb today, but the damage to the Tongass is going on NOW.
Thundershaper
This is a thoroughly interesting, and meticulously researched book. The people who were affected by unsustainable logging in the Tongass through the 20th century, such as small logging companies, residents of southeast Alaska, and the Native Tlinget people come to life in these pages through many interviews.
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It's not just recently scientists and people who care about the environment have talked against clearing rain forests. How could one not be moved by those seemingly endless stretches of trees in the southern tropical countries of Brazil and Malaysia? After all, they're home to tons of plants, bugs, birds and animals, along with some native peoples.

What's recent is the attention to another kind of rain forest, called the coastal temperate. It's a rain forest that needs cool summers. It also needs a total rainfall each year of more than 55 inches. This kind of rain forest used to be found on the west sides of continents. Only Africa and Antarctica never had them. Ireland and Scotland used to be famous for them. Norway still has them in pockets. There's also quite a bit along Chile, New Zealand, and Tasmania. But the greatest of them all runs from Kodiak Island in the Alaska gulf south, through the Alaska panhandle and Canada's British Columbia coast to Vancouver Island.

Alaska's rain forests are a breathtaking sight. They're also good for the world. They build up and store more organic material than any other forest on earth. Some of that material drops into the nearby ocean. That's why Alaska's waters are full of the most scrumptious shellfish, salmon and halibut around.

And yet for over 40 years some of those forests were logged quickly and uncontrollably. Other forests were likewise logged some 20 years later. Salmon-spawning streams and black-tailed deer homes were ruined. Poorly built logging roads brought about landslides and brought in poachers. Caves underneath the trees were an archaeologist's treasure chest. But cutting down the trees caved in caverns and buried a part of our world history.

By the end of the 20th century, almost 1 million acres worth of trees were gone. It wasn't just muskeg, conifer and alpine scrub. It was western red cedar, western hemlock, Sitka spruce, and Alaska yellow cedar. The sad thing's no matter the tree, it was turned into pulp or 2-by-4's. That meant a lot of big, old, strong, tall trees cut down to make low-priced wood products that could have been made from lower-quality wood from elsewhere. Fewer trees could have been cut down and more money could have been made if the goal'd instead been turning out custom and specialty wood products for higher prices.

Pressure from nature supporters, native peoples and area residents put an end to TONGASS PULP POLITICS AND THE FIGHT FOR THE ALASKA RAIN FOREST might be won in the 21st century. Adventure packages, cruise ships, food production, handcrafts, small-scale custom and specialty logging, and tourist accommodations keep people employed and communities afloat. Forest service workers are cleaning up streams, redoing bad roads, and watching second-growth trees. So for the time being, there's more respect to what Virignia Tech master gardeners call the wildlands-urban interface of where people and nature meet.

Author Kathie Durbin's book is well-organized. It has clear examples and telling photos. It ends with a good bibliography and index. It's aimed at nature-supporting and community-building readers.
Kikora
This book tells the truth. It isn't some biased interpretation of events, but rather a compilation of facts strung together into a very readable narrative. I live here too and ask at what cost should the mills be protected? Apparently Forest Cole thinks at a high one with the Logjam sale. His entire justification is keeping the mills going. The Tongass has more user groups than one and all others are asked to suffer for well over 100 years for this one. It's time to place a correct valuation on this resource and stop subsidizing it's managed destruction.

If you want a purely capitalistic argument, let's price the trees here 1 tree, 1 price to any user (leave it standing or cut it) and see what becomes of them. I bet not many would get cut that way as the true economic cost is too high in most cases without corrupt subsidization.
Bukelv
As relative newcomer to Southeast Alaska (1998), I have found it difficult to obtain unbiased views regarding regional resource management. This excellent bit of history by Durbin tells a very important story about this incredible national resource and the people who have shaped it, for better or worse. Many of the people mentioned are neighbors and acquaintances who have played important roles in shaping the newer policies affecting the Tongass. I now have a much greater appreciation and respect for those who took real risks and fought hard to improve timber practices on the Tongass, which is more than I can say for our state's congressional delegation. Durbin has done a real service to those of us trying to better understand the complexities of the various governmental agencies, corporations(including Native corporations), environmental groups, and private citizens that intertwine to determine whether resources are to be managed in a truly sustainable fashion in this spectacular place.
Ber
Kathie Durbin reveals the irresponsible and corrupt practices of the U.S. government, the Forest Service, and the pulp mills it was in bed with in Southeast Alaska, and how their destructive logging practices politicized a whole contingent of people to stop the decimation of our last temperate rainforest. Read "Tongass" and your blood will boil over what happened there, and what is still happening in many of our other forests today.