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by Christian G. Samito

Download Fear Was Not in Him: The Civil War Letters of General Francis C. Barlow, U.S.A (The North's Civil War) fb2
Author: Christian G. Samito
ISBN: 0823223248
Language: English
Pages: 312 pages
Category: Americas
Publisher: Fordham University Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2006)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: docx lit rtf azw
FB2 size: 1429 kb | EPUB size: 1225 kb | DJVU size: 1532 kb
Sub: History

One of the greatest soldiers of the war, Barlow rose from lieutenant to general, suffered two serious wounds in combat, and played critical roles at Antietam, . .

One of the greatest soldiers of the war, Barlow rose from lieutenant to general, suffered two serious wounds in combat, and played critical roles at Antietam, .Published by: Fordham University.

Start by marking Fear Was Not in Him: The .

Start by marking Fear Was Not in Him: The Civil War Letters of General Francis C. Barlow, . a as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Barlow enl Originally untrained in military science, Francis Channing Barlow ended the Civil War as one of the North's premier combat generals.

Few volunteer soldiers of the Civil War achieved the success that Barlow did, rising from a private in.

Few volunteer soldiers of the Civil War achieved the success that Barlow did, rising from a private in 1861 to major general in 1865. His upbringing was hardly that of a future warrior. The first, Christian Samito's "Fear Was Not in Him," consists of Barlow's wartime correspondence from May 2, 1861, to July 19, 1864, the latter date only ten days before his wife, Arabella, died of typhoid fever. This devastating event shook the seemingly imperturbable Barlow and contributed largely to a decline in his health that forced him to take a leave of absence from the army, which lasted until March 1865.

Francis C. Barlow, Christian G. Samito. Brought together for the first time, one of the most important collections of Civil War letters is that of Francis Channing Barlow. A young intellectual from Massachusetts, Barlow was a successful lawyer in New York City and friends with such people as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Winslow Homer's family when he went off to war. Leaving his wife hours after their marriage, Barlow probably never contemplated the conversion he would undergo

Originally untrained in military science, Francis Channing Barlow ended the Civil War as one of the North's premier combat generals

Originally untrained in military science, Francis Channing Barlow ended the Civil War as one of the North's premier combat generals.

Barlow, Francis C. and Samito, Christian G. Fear Was Not In Him: The Civil War Letters of Major General Francis C. New York: Fordham University Press, 2004. Demarest, William . Tercentenary Studies, 1928, Reformed Church in America: A Record of Beginnings. New York: Reformed Church in America, 1928. Hunt, Roger D. and Brown, Jack R. Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue. Gaithersburg, M. Olde Soldier Books, 1990.

Series The North's Civil War. Fordham University Press. Originally untrained in military science, Francis Channing Barlow ended the Civil War as one of the North's premier combat generals. Fear Was Not in Him. The Civil War Letters of General Francis C. By. Christian G.

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and Changes in Law and Society During the Civil War and Reconstruction: A Legal History Documentary Reader.

Fear Was Not in Him: The Civil War Letters of General Francis C. A (The North's Civil War)

Fear Was Not in Him: The Civil War Letters of General Francis C. A (The North's Civil War). The Quartermaster: Montgomery C. Meigs, Lincoln's General, Master Builder of the Union Army. After the war times read about how he had cannons placed in his front yard to protect his second wife and newborn son from a person threatening political retributions and how his third child was born on the anniversary of his first wife's death.

Originally untrained in military science, Francis Channing Barlow ended the Civil War as one of the North's premier combat generals. He played decisive roles in historic campaigns throughout the War and his letters are classic accounts of courage combat, and the burdens of command as experienced by one of the Union's fiercest officers.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Barlow enlisted in April 1861 at the age of twenty six, commanded the 61st New York Infantry regiment by April 1862, and found himself a general in command of a division by 1863. He played a key role at Fair Oaks, Antietam, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Petersburg, suffered two serious wounds in combat, and was left for dead at Gettysburg, where part of the battlefield is named after him. Barlow's war correspondence not only provides a rich description of his experiences in these actions but also offers insight into a civilian learning the realities of war.

As a young intellectual, Barlow was also well connected with many eminent figures of his time. He spent part of his youth at Brook Farm, graduated first in his Harvard College class, and became a successful New York City lawyer by the time he enlisted. Among his friends he counted Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., and Winslow Homer's family. Transformed by his experiences in the War, Barlow entered politics and served as New York's Secretary of State and Attorney General.

Superbly edited by Christian G. Samito, Barlow's letters not only illuminate the life of a talented battlefield commander; they also fill a gap in Civil War scholarship by providing a valuable window into Northern intellectual responses to the War.