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by Barbara W. Tuchman,Nadia May

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Author: Barbara W. Tuchman,Nadia May
ISBN: 1433218216
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; Unabridged edition (April 1, 2009)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: rtf mobi lrf docx
FB2 size: 1133 kb | EPUB size: 1628 kb | DJVU size: 1429 kb
Sub: History

Barbara Tuchman brilliantly brings to life the major participants and their . Many more salutes should be offered to the author of The First Salute. This work's subtitle (& View of the American Revolution') is accurate: it's one vista rather than a comprehensive history.

Barbara Tuchman brilliantly brings to life the major participants and their countries involved in the American colonies achievement of independence. The First Salute is the 1st recognition of the new government as a ship sails into a Dutch port in the Caribbean. I am a retired history teacher. I am a retired history teacher

Barbara Tuchman brilliantly brings to life the major participants and their countries involved in the American colonies achievement of independence. Essential war cargo is obtained as well as the recognition despite British threats. I was completely mistaken!!!

The First Salute book.

The First Salute book. Ms. Tuchman wants to demonstrate the importance of the Dutch navy, the Call me a traditionalist, but I think it is reasonable to assume that a book promising to be about the American Revolution, even one claiming a "fresh approach", should have more than a passing reference to the battle for American independence.

Books are humanity in print.

This compellingly written history presents a fresh, new view of the events that led from the first foreign salute to American nationhood in 1776 to the last campaign of the Revolution five years later. It paints a magnificent portrait of General George Washington and recounts in riveting detail the events responsible for the birth of our nation. Books are humanity in print. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail.

Praise for Barbara Tuchman and The First Salute. The effect of the American Revolution on the nature of government in the society of Europe was felt and recognized from the moment it became a fact. tightly woven narrative, ingeniously structured. She concludes with a salute for all that America has achieved, and a deep sadness for all that it hasn’t. Galen Wilson, Manuscript Curator of the William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan, for records of Sir Henry Clinton.

Barbara W. Tuchman, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the classic The Guns of August, turns her sights . Tuchman, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the classic The Guns of August, turns her sights homeward with this brilliant, insightful narrative of the Revolutionary War. In The First Salute, one of America’s consummate historians crafts a rigorously original view of the American Revolution.

This Author: Barbara W. Tuchman. This Narrator: Nadia May. This Publisher: Blackstone Audio. The First Salute: A View of the American Revolution. by Barbara W. Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize and best-selling author Barbara W. Tuchman analyzes the American Revolution in a brilliantly original way, placing the war in the historical context of the centuries-long conflicts between England and both France and Holland. This compellingly written history paints a magnificent portrait of General George Washington and recounts in riveting detail the events responsible for the birth of our nation. The First Salute is the 1st recognition of the new government as a ship sails into a Dutch port in the Caribbean

Barbara Tuchman brilliantly brings to life the major participants and their countries involved in the American colonies achievement of independence. European politics and key individuals are brought to life; warts and all for both people and countries.

Home Tuchman, Barbara W. The First Salute; A View of the American . Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Publication Date: 1989. Book Condition: Near Fine. The First Salute; A View of the American Revolution. Tuchman, Barbara W. Published by Michael Joseph, London, 1989. Condition: Near Fine Hardcover. From Evening Star Books, ABAA/ILAB (Madison, WI, . Title: The First Salute; A View of the American. Publisher: Michael Joseph, London. Dust Jacket Condition: Near Fine.

Barbara Tuchman subtitles this well-written book as "A View of the American Revolution," which seems applicable . However there will be many out there who will not appreciate the slow build-up of The First Salute.

Barbara Tuchman subtitles this well-written book as "A View of the American Revolution," which seems applicable enough. It is the view from the European side, at least at first.

This compellingly written history paints a magnificent portrait of General George Washington and recounts in riveting detail the events responsible for the birth of our nation.
Comments (7)
Andriodtargeted
Full disclosure. I REALLY like the writings of Barbara Tuchman.

This is an excellent compendium of essays, articles and speeches written by her over many years. Some from the 30's and 40's. Most from the 60's and 70's. I find her way of saying things rings true with me, and I like the way she puts history into context. I have the sense that hers is not revisionist history in any way, but history presented in a manner which makes sense to me.

I bought the Kindle version. OK, but not the same thing as having a real book in my hands.

Highly recommended.
Adrietius
When the British Colonies in America revolted and declared themselves to be the "United States of America" they were not recognized as a separate nation by the rest of the world. Especially not the European nations! This is the history of how important it was when an American merchant ship sailed into the Dutch West Indian island of St. Eustatius and the fort guarding the port fired a solute to our flag. Tuchman stresses how important this was and how the Dutch, not the French, were the first Europeans to recognize our independence and to provide an safe port for American blockade runners to secure the war materials needed by Washington and our Revolutionary Army.
JoJogar
Barbara Tuchman brilliantly brings to life the major participants and their countries involved in the American colonies achievement of independence. The First Salute is the 1st recognition of the new government as a ship sails into a Dutch port in the Caribbean. Essential war cargo is obtained as well as the recognition despite British threats. European politics and key individuals are brought to life; warts and all for both people and countries. Dutch involvement is one important key. A similar setting is provided for the breakaway colonies and their leaders. Especially important are the navies, their commanders and tactics and what is best described as luck. France's efforts on behalf of the rebellious colonies is especially critical as are the over complacent and conservative British military leaders. People do count! Tuchman doesn't point out that following Cornwallis' surrender at Yorktown, he becomes the Viceroy of India; a promotion!
Tenius
Many more salutes should be offered to the author of The First Salute. I am a retired history teacher. specializing in American history, who thought she knew all there was to know about this particular period of American history...I was completely mistaken!!! Tuchman is a master /mistress of providing her readers with accuracy in provocative fascinating ways, making each page a certain delight in learning much, much more about the heroes, nasties and just plain folks who inhabit these pages. Recommendations to all, regardless of age, to peruse and enjoy The First Salute.
Fenius
No better writer of history in her time. Her book starts with a little remembered moment and builds from that to a point of view that explains a lot of American history not well covered in the ordinary and usual history books. Her writing style is fine, far better than the usual academic writing. She makes her strong views known, and she puts blame where it seemingly belongs. Her books set a standard few historians can reach; her research is impeccable. Anyone can enjoy all her work and wish she were still around to do more.
Froststalker
This work's subtitle (`A View of the American Revolution') is accurate: it's one vista rather than a comprehensive history. Like much of Tuchman's work, it's an accessible and interesting account with fresh insight on the rebels and their European enemy and allies in the late war years.

The episodic text sometimes seems to wander (the longest of the twelve chapters deals with British Admiral Sir George Brydges Rodney), but ultimately rewards the reader with a coherent message: the American Revolution wasn't simply a domestic divorce - it benefited from (and largely succeeded because of) continental rivalries.

Poignant accounts of rebel leaders (Washington, Franklin, Morris, etc) are matched to their perilous links with their allies in the Netherlands and France. One learns French regular troops at Yorktown outnumbered American colonial regulars (without including troops on de Grasse's 31 ship fleet); French funds paid for rebel wages, supplies, and arms; and that Bourbon France incurred a 1.5 billion livre ($375 million) debt for the pleasure of helping defeat rival Britain (it led to the bankruptcy and fall of the ancien régime in 1789).

Tuchman could have embellished her case with Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais (watchmaker, inventor, playwright of `The Marriage of Figaro' and `The Barber of Seville') who served as clandestine French conduit for rebel funds and arms before Saratoga in 1777 (and narrowly escaped execution in the French Revolution). The ultimate destiny of de Grasse, Rochambeau, and Lafayette would also have been interesting (for Lafayette's later history read Simon Shama's `Citizens').

Nonetheless, `The First Salute' is worth reading (I first read it in hardcover in 1988 and still admire it).
Throw her heart
I absolutely loved this book. It filled in so many gaps in my understanding of the American Revolution and "how did it happen that Washington beat Cornwallis to end the American War for Independence against England?" I find most commentaries on the American Revolution are about the beginning (Lexington/Concord, Bunker Hill, Brooklyn Heights, Trenton, Valley Forge, Brandywine, Saratoga, etc.), but very little covers the topic about How it Ended. Plus, it is hard to find a coherent analysis on the contribution of the anti-British alies (Spain but above all, France) in defeating the English at Yorktown. The central theme in the book covers the naval story, from American privateers to Dutch traders. The book fills a lot of gaps