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by John Egerton

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Author: John Egerton
ISBN: 0807845574
Language: English
Pages: 768 pages
Category: Americas
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; Reprint edition (November 6, 1995)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: mbr lrf rtf doc
FB2 size: 1591 kb | EPUB size: 1916 kb | DJVU size: 1648 kb
Sub: History

This book addresses the Civil Rights movement between 1930 and 1954, providing invaluable background .

This book addresses the Civil Rights movement between 1930 and 1954, providing invaluable background to the struggle in the 1960's. The author describes President Harry Truman's important role with his Civil Rights Commission's report and Truman's desegregation of the federal Civil Service and military. Many of the legislative successes of the 1960's were built on the Truman Commission's work. Stories of origins are always interesting and this tale of the activists in the generation prior to the modern movement is riveting, especially in its telling of the story of many who have been forgotten, some of whom were never well known.

Start by marking Speak Now Against the Day: The . It's very wide ranging and ties together a number of threads of Southern culture to explore what happened in the generation prior to the "official" Civil Rights Movement.

Start by marking Speak Now Against the Day: The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. However, my main criticism is also connected to its breadth- it's a sizable book and by the end, I was mostly just skimming because it gets a little bogged down in detail.

The voices of the dissenters, although prese Speak Now Against the Day is the astonishing, little-known story of. .However, it's a book that will introduce you to the most fascinating people you've never heard of, and the best books you've never read.

The voices of the dissenters, although prese Speak Now Against the Day is the astonishing, little-known story of the Southerners who, in the generation before the Supreme Court outlawed school segregation and before Rosa Parks refused to surrender her seat on a Montgomery bus, challenged the validity of a white ruling class and a "separate but equal" division of the races. The voices of the dissenters, although present throughout the South's troubled history, grew louder with Roosevelt's election in 1932.

Day : The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South .

Speak Now Against the Day : The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South. The precedent for any book about the history of the modern Civil Rights movement. We can see the great tide turning in the thirties and forties, as the struggle begins just to recoup the ground lost in the 1870's and after, Lyndon Johnson's voting rights bill a resurrection of the same failed bill of the Redemption era. Out of many issues in this very useful book is a reminder of how Lyndon Johnson, extremely adept in this Lost Cause dominion, was deftly able at the right moment to get the job done, if it has been done.

JOHN EGERTON was one of the foremost experts on Southern food and culture until his passing in 2013. He was best known for his writing on the Civil Rights movement and Southern history. Библиографические данные. Speak Now Against The Day: The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South.

Egerton's Speak Now Against the Day: The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award.

now against the day: the generation before the civil rights movement in the South/John Egerton

Speak now against the day: the generation before the civil rights movement in the South/John Egerton. 1st ed. p. cm. eISBN: 978-0-307-83457-7. 1. Civil rights workers-Southern states-History-20th century. 2. Civil rights workers-Southern states-Biography. 3. Civil rights movements-Southern states-History-20th century. Two days after the Hiroshima blast, he told his readers that Hitler had turned Germany into one great big Ku Klux Klan Klavern, but now justice had finally prevailed, because it was Jewish refugees and other exiles fleeing from the Nazi dictator who had come to America and created the A-bomb that won the war.

Egerton's examination of the South in the period immediately preceding the civil rights movement is less history .

Egerton's examination of the South in the period immediately preceding the civil rights movement is less history through group biography than history through cameo appearance. Chronicling the Southern Tenant Farmer's Union and other groups, Egerton reminds us that conscience and opposition to racism existed in the South before Rosa Parks took her seat on the bus. But all these considerable strengths are dissipated by the way Egerton uses the huge cast he has selected. Those - black and white, rich and poor - who set the stage for Martin Luther King Jr. appear, disappear, and reappear in dizzying fashion.

Egerton's examination of the South in the period immediately preceding . John Egerton was born on June 14, 1935

Egerton's examination of the South in the period immediately preceding the civil rights movement is less history through group biography than history through cameo appearance. John Egerton was born on June 14, 1935. He received an undergraduate degree from the University of Kentucky after serving two years in the Army and then went into public relations. He won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for Speak Now Against the Day: The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South and the Lillian Smith Book Award for Generations: An American Family.

The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South. 1995 Southern Book Award for Nonfiction, Southern Book Critics Circle. The compelling story of the earliest calls for desegregation and racial justice in the South. Make room on your library shelf. 768 p. 25 x . 5, 102 photos. Not for Sale in British Commonwealth except Canada.

The compelling story of the earliest calls for desegregation and racial justice in the South. "Make room on your library shelf . . . for John Egerton's magnificent Speak Now Against the Day. His book is a stunning achievement: a sprawling, engrossing, deeply moving account of those Southerners, black and white, who raised their voices to challenge the South's racial mores. . . . [This] is an eloquent and passionate book, and . . . one we cannot afford to forget.--Charles B. Dew, New York Times Book Review"A rich and inspiring story. . . . [Egerton] has uncovered a buried treasure.--Studs Terkel"[A] superb book, measured but eloquent.--Dan T. Carter, Washington Post Book World
Comments (7)
Gavirgas
Although it is certainly not as well known or acclaimed as Taylor Branch's Parting the Waters, Egerton's Speak Now Against the Day, is perhaps my favorite book on the civil rights movement. Stories of origins are always interesting and this tale of the activists in the generation prior to the modern movement is riveting, especially in its telling of the story of many who have been forgotten, some of whom were never well known. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in learning about this period, about the enormous courage, strengths, and blind spots of those who led the way - the John the Baptists if you will. Many were white southern liberals, some were moderate segregationists, others were radicals. They tried to convince their brethren of the necessity of change. Their failure set the stage for the titanic clashes of the '50s and '60's and as well as the counter-reaction which followed.
ACOS
This book addresses the Civil Rights movement between 1930 and 1954, providing invaluable background to the struggle in the 1960's. The author describes President Harry Truman's important role with his Civil Rights Commission's report and Truman's desegregation of the federal Civil Service and military. Many of the legislative successes of the 1960's were built on the Truman Commission's work.
Shan
Egerton's book is a masterful review of what really happened in the South and in the USA generally before the Civil Rights Movement of the '60s even started. I lived through those days, born in 1927, and became radicalized against Southern "gentility" by courses on the Bible taught using the historical/critical method of reading. I am not in the book, but I lost jobs and fought for the equality of all people beginning in the late 1940s. I recommend Egerton's book to any and all who would like to know what really went on back in those formative days. Jim Sanders
Ubrise
A recent work by MacPherson on the battle of Antietam attempts to locate the turning point in the Civil War. Reading this work one wonders if the whole history of abolition is not a series of endless turning points against eternal delays. This very cogent work by someone acquainted with the facts is an invaluable expose of how politics actually works in that scarface Uncle Sam's 'democracy' of equals. Giving the history and gritty details of post-Reconstruction politics dominated by the Bourbon elites, it is essential reading for anyone attempting to decipher the legacy of the Civil Rights movement this period prefigures, and starts to anticipate. Histories of Roosevelt's presidency don't always make clear what was going on, and the obstacles he faced. Nor do we quite assess the effect of the Second World War on the economic context behind Jim Crow in its ad infinitum history of domination, political manipulation, and class and racial struggle. We can see the great tide turning in the thirties and forties, as the struggle begins just to recoup the ground lost in the 1870's and after, Lyndon Johnson's voting rights bill a resurrection of the same failed bill of the Redemption era. Out of many issues in this very useful book is a reminder of how Lyndon Johnson, extremely adept in this Lost Cause dominion, was deftly able at the right moment to get the job done, if it has been done. With this history, keep your eyes peeled. We could be far short of 'done'.
Debeme
I found this a stupendous book, and while at times I felt I was treading well-known ground, and at times the account of the efforts of groups battling to end segregation was overly extensive in discussing individuals of little present fame, the book reads pleasantly and effortlessly, with the decision in Brown v. Board of Education as the good finale. I would recommend that after reading this book one should read Simple Justice, by Richard Kluger, which tells the story of Brown v. Board of Education itself superlatively. The title of this book is from a statement by William Faulkner heavy with prophetic insight: "We speak now against the day when our Southern people who will resist to the last these inevitable changes in social relations, will, when they have been forced to accept what they at one time might have accepted with dignity and goodwill, will say: 'Why didn't someone tell us this before? Tell us this in time?'"