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by John Ludwickson,John M. O'Shea

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Author: John Ludwickson,John M. O'Shea
ISBN: 0803235569
Language: English
Pages: 374 pages
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (May 1, 1992)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: txt doc mobi lrf
FB2 size: 1998 kb | EPUB size: 1639 kb | DJVU size: 1571 kb
Sub: History

Home Browse Books Book details, Archaeology and Ethnohistory of the Omaha. Only three archaeological sites of undisputed Omaha affiliation have been professionally investigated, and just one, Big Village was accorded a major program of excavation.

Home Browse Books Book details, Archaeology and Ethnohistory of the Omaha. Archaeology and Ethnohistory of the Omaha Indians: The Big Village Site. By John M. O'Shea, John Ludwickson. It is nothing short of incredible that a village site as prominent to early travelers as Big Village has not previously figured in the understanding of American Indian lifeways on the Missouri during the contact period.

The Big Village Site (Studies in the Anthropology of North Ame)

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John M. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Archaeology and ethnohistory of the Omaha Indians : the Big Village site John M. Book's title: Archaeology and ethnohistory of the Omaha Indians : the Big Village site John M. Library of Congress Control Number: 89035986 //r92. National Bibliography Number

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John Leland Champe (1895–1978) was an academic and archaeologist especially influential in the area of Great Plains archaeology. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press. Champe was born in 1895 in Elwood, Nebraska. In 1921, he earned a BA from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in mathematics. ISBN 978-0-8032-3556-4. Retrieved 2010-05-09.

Archaeology and Ethnohistory of the Omaha Indians: The Big Village Site by John M. .

For seventy years, from about 1775 until 1845, Big Village was the principal settlement of the Omaha Indians. Situated on the Missouri River seventy-five miles above the present city of Omaha, it commanded a strategic location astride this major trade route to the northern plains. A host of traders and travelers, from Jean-Baptiste Truteau and James Mackay to Lewis and Clark and Father De Smet, left descriptions of the village. Although John Champe of the University of Nebraska carried out a comprehensive archaeological investigation of the site from 1939 to 1942 (the only intensive, systematic archaeological study of any Omaha site), the results of his work have heretofore remained unpublished. Now John M. O'Shea and John Ludwickson have combined Champe's findings with the major historical accounts of the Omahas, providing significant new insights into the course of Omaha history in the preservation period. The emphasis on material culture gives a unique view of the daily life of these people and illustrates clearly the integration of European trade items with traditional technologies. Here the fur trade is seen in a fresh perspective, that of the suppliers of furs and recipients of trade goods. An examination of Omaha demography rounds out this important new ethnohistorical sketch of the Omaha Indians.