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by Joshua B. Freeman

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Author: Joshua B. Freeman
ISBN: 1565847121
Language: English
Pages: 432 pages
Category: Americas
Publisher: New Press, The (September 1, 2001)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: rtf lrf docx azw
FB2 size: 1205 kb | EPUB size: 1447 kb | DJVU size: 1774 kb
Sub: History

Working Class New York," meticulously follows the labor movement's progress and retrenchments, starting with its halcyon days in the post-war 1940s.

Working Class New York," meticulously follows the labor movement's progress and retrenchments, starting with its halcyon days in the post-war 1940s. It makes no bones about the powerful impetus communist politics played, and the subsequent loss of energy that coincided with the Reds being chased out of American labor. Freeman illustrates how the union movement reflected changes in the city as it lost manufacturing jobs and embraced the financial and service-based industries

Freeman intended that the book correct histories of New York City which focused on wealthy elites, elected leaders and organizations

Freeman intended that the book correct histories of New York City which focused on wealthy elites, elected leaders and organizations. Throughout the first half of the book, Freeman argues that everyday workers were at least as influential as these other groups in making New York City into a progressive bastion and world economic and cultural center.

Working-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II. Joshua B. Freeman. New York: The New Press, 2000. Freeman’s book is a post war history of New York City labor, but it is also a full-fledged history of the city itself, since it is impossible to tell Gotham’s true story without mentioning the many men and women who built the Big Apple and kept it working. Working class culture was intensely visible on the streets of New York in 1945. It still is, especially in the outer boroughs.

Working-Class New York book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Working-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Working-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Freeman, Joshua Benjamin. New York : New Press : Distributed by . Books for People with Print Disabilities.

The narrative in "Working Class New York," grows less interesting along with the declining labor movement it chronicles. After all, Joshua Freeman did not write a novel, rather penned an important nonfiction and academic effort that tells the story of New York through its workers. Working Class New York," is wonderfully done and demonstrative, at every turn, with the author's passion for his subject. But, for labor enthusiasts, the end can't match the beginning for excitement

In what Publishers Weekly calls "absorbing and beautifully detailed history," historian Joshua Freeman shows how the anticommunist purges of the 1950s decimated the ranks of the labor movement and demoralized its idealists, and how the fiscal crisis of the mid-1970s dealt another crushing blow to liberal ideals as the city's wealthy elite made a frenzied grab for power. A grand work of cultural and social history, Working-Class New York is a moving.

Working-Class New York: Life and Labor since World War II (New York: The New Press, 2000.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Working-Class New York : Life and Labor since . More than any American city, New York in the years after World War II laid out an idealistic and equitable path to the future.

More than any American city, New York in the years after World War II laid out an idealistic and equitable path to the future. Ordinary workers and a dynamic labor movement helped make New York the envied model of liberal America and the scourge of conservatives everywhere: union wages and benefits, cheap and easy-to-use mass transit, affordable public housing, and healthcare for all. Product Identifiers.

Working-Class New York. A lucid, detailed, and imaginative analysis (The Nation) of the model city that working-class New Yorkers created after World War II-and its tragic demise. Life and Labor Since World War II. More than any other city in America, New York in the years after the Second World War carved out an idealistic and equitable path to the future.

History
Comments (7)
Runeterror
A well written history of NYC providing the information to understand present day New York and its challenges
Kieel
This book is balanced and strongest in its discussion of the 1940s through the 1960s. After that period, however, the author tends to see the politics of the city as a battle between the good guys in white hats versus the bad guys in black hats.
Freeman's shallow, tendentious treatment of New York's fiscal crisis of the 1970s, for example (perhaps the most important event in the second half of the twentieth century for New York), allows him to portray it as a mere excuse for mean spirited, right-wing attacks on labor's gains. According to Freeman, the good guys (labor and its allies) sought to defend their eminently reasonable and necessary social-democratic policies, while the bad guys (lawyers, investment bankers, etc.) used the purported budgetary problems as an excuse to roll back social welfare policies. Even those unfamiliar with New York, however, will realize that generous social welfare programs, combined with strong municipal unions and pervasive political patronage is, at the very least, expensive. If you want to go that policy route, you have to be willing to pay for it-you can't just borrow money forever. But even that limited degree of complexity is more than Freeman presents.
For Freeman, recent New York politics is as simple as "social democracy" for the people versus right-wing "ideologues." For that reason, to take but one example, the treatment of recent immigration is egregiously shortchanged.
Modigas
A fascinating, in-depth look at an exciting time in NYC history. It is well-written.
Ttyr
This writer deeply researched his topic. I understand New York City in a whole new way. It is academic so be prepared to reach rich descriptions. However, I found it well worth reading.
Kamick
Had to wait a few days but at the price cant complain!
Vonalij
The narrative in "Working Class New York," grows less interesting along with the declining labor movement it chronicles.

That's no criticism. After all, Joshua Freeman did not write a novel, rather penned an important nonfiction and academic effort that tells the story of New York through its workers.

"Working Class New York," is wonderfully done and demonstrative, at every turn, of the author's passion for his subject.

But, for labor enthusiasts, the end can't match the beginning for excitement.

In the early chapters, the poesy of labor reigns as the Hatters, Printers, Furriers, Elevator Operators, Milliners, Bakers and Tugboat workers, representing a rainbow of crafts and productive industries, bring the world's mightiest city to a halt through mass strikes driven by the underlining goal of reorganizing society itself.

Freeman's analysis of New York's economic structure, and how it created a textured union movement unequaled in the rest of the country, is fascinating and as much a love letter to the unions as to Gotham itself.

Indeed, the author frequently asserts that the city's best face was the lined countenance of the laborer or craftsperson enlightened by their recognition of a shared destiny, on the shop floor and front stoop, with similarly situated souls.

"Working Class New York," meticulously follows the labor movement's progress and retrenchments, starting with its halcyon days in the post-war 1940s.

It makes no bones about the powerful impetus communist politics played, and the subsequent loss of energy that coincided with the Reds being chased out of American labor.

Freeman illustrates how the union movement reflected changes in the city as it lost manufacturing jobs and embraced the financial and service-based industries.

His mapping of municipal unionism's rise has less of a workerist flavor and more of what the departed Allan Bloom called the "Nitzscheanization of the left," as ethnicity and cultural issues consumed unions' internal power struggles and drove their industrial strategies.

And the book details how the decline of labor in New York reflected its nationwide losses as the country grew more individualistic and market-oriented in the 1970s and '80s.

Freeman's chapter on how financial types used The Big Apple's fiscal crisis in the late 1970s to undermine and rollback the unions' hard-earned, and unique urban social democracy, is must-read for anyone interested in those dynamics affecting the American workplace for nigh on a generation now.
Halloween
Essential reading for those who want to know how NY labor's pioneering mid-century strides towards American social democracy were beaten back by the banksters and landlords.