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by James F. Clapp III MD,Catherine Cram MS

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Author: James F. Clapp III MD,Catherine Cram MS
ISBN: 1936374331
Language: English
Pages: 245 pages
Category: Exercise & Fitness
Publisher: Addicus Books; 2 edition (July 15, 2012)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: mobi txt docx lrf
FB2 size: 1240 kb | EPUB size: 1253 kb | DJVU size: 1191 kb

James F. Clapp, III, MD, was a professor emeritus of reproductive biology at Case Western Reserve University and .

Catherine Cram, MS, is an exercise physiologist specializing in prenatal and postpartum fitness whose consulting company, Comprehensive Fitness Consulting, LLC, provides maternal-fitness courses for health and fitness professionals. She is the coauthor of Fit Pregnancy for Dummies and writes for Baby Years, Pregnancy, and Women’s Health and Fitness magazines. She is the coauthor of Fit Pregnancy for Dummies and writes for Baby Years, Pregnancy, and Women's Health and Fitness magazines.

The book provides guidelines for exercise plans that safely fulfill a mother's needs during different phases of pregnancy, answering such questions as. .Exercising Through Your Pregnancy - James F. Clapp.

The book provides guidelines for exercise plans that safely fulfill a mother's needs during different phases of pregnancy, answering such questions as, How does exercise benefit the mother? How does exercise affect growth of the fetus? What is the effect of exercise on milk production? Does exercise limit weight gain during pregnancy? What is the right amount of exercise? What are the dos and don'ts of exercising when pregnant? .

James F.

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Catherine Cram, James F. Fit Pregnancy for Dummies.

According to James F. Clapp, . author of "Exercising Through Your ""Pregnancy" women can exercise before, during, after their pregnancies.

Exercising Through Your Pregnancy book. According to James F. author of Exercising Through Your Pregnancy women can exercise before, during, after their pregnancies

Exercising Through Your Pregnancy book. author of Exercising Through Your Pregnancy women can exercise before, during, after their pregnancies. Some Exercise is good for pregnant women! In addition to the regular benefits of exercise, pregnant women who exercise are likely to return to their pre-pregnancy shapes sooner, feel increased energy, and fend of stress more readily.

Examining the effects of exercise on women and their babies, this book presents case studies of women who exercised regularly before, during, and after pregnancy. The book provides guidelines for exercise plans that safely fulfill a mother's needs during different phases of pregnancy, answering such questions as, How does exercise benefit the mother? How does exercise affect growth of the fetus? What is the effect of exercise on milk production? Does exercise limit weight gain during pregnancy? What is the right amount of exercise? What are the dos and don'ts of exercising when pregnant? When should exercise be avoided? How late into pregnancy can you exercise? and What should be the exercise regimen after giving birth? Updated to include the latest scientific information on staying fit during pregnancy and emphasize appropriate exercises, this new edition thoroughly describes the changes that happen to the mother while she’s pregnant and how both she and the child can benefit through exercise.

Comments (7)
Cordanara
I am really enjoying this book. I exercise regularly now (pre conception) with high intensity interval training, endurance running, heavy weight lifting and plyometrics. This is the only book I have found that gives specific, factual information regarding exercise during pregnancy. So many other books recommend not lifting more than ten pounds (are you kidding me? my purse weighs more than that!) or not getting your heart rate about 140 (this is below my zone 2 now- what I consider my easy runs). They give the impression that women are weak and not capable of or interested in being physically powerful. Additionally, these recommendations have always seemed arbitrary to me; I want to know that if I have to drastically alter my lifestyle and give up so may activities that I truly enjoy that the need to do so is based on science and not condescending paternalism. This book gives me the guidelines I will need to follow to allow me to exercise safely. This is exactly what I was looking for.
In addition to the content, the book is written and organized very well. It's full of cold hard science; no cutesy pictures or flowery stories- so it may not be for everyone. I highly recommend this book to any women who are looking for the facts about exercising during pregnancy!
TheMoonix
People looking for a "workout plan" or suggested exercises most likely will be disappointed in this book, because it is more of a description of a large case study that the author did on exercising and non-exercising women through their pregnancies. I found the facts very interesting and motivating, and I used the information as basis in discussions when people would ask me about whether continuing to run was "safe" for my baby. There is even interesting information on the intelligence of the children in the exercising group as they got older. If I recall correctly, however, the author's study requirements to fit his "exercising" category were pretty high- moderate to high intensity 50 mins/day 5+ days I week, continued all the way through pregnancy, I think. Although he had case study results for a lighter exercise category as well.

I think that personal trainers and fitness instructors who interact with pregnant women would benefit from the information in this book. It puts a lot of the old guidelines (heart rate 140, etc) to rest, which is good news for those of us who were at a high fitness level when we became pregnant.

There are some photos in the back and some sample exercises, but they are very basic, and more along the lines of stretches, yoga ball moves, resistance band training, etc.
Anardred
Great info as a fitness coach. There are too many myths about exercising while pregnant. This book proves it's ok and even more beneficial to exercise while pregnant. Love that there are studies upon studies discussed. Great reference info.
Wohald
I chose to purchase this particular book because I was really frustrated on the lack of scientific information given to me by various healthcare providers as I am currently 31 weeks pregnant and felt exercising as I have done in past "seemed" fine. After reading the first pages and subsequent chapters I knew I had purchased the correct book to fit my needs and it gave me the peace of mind to shake off the negative remarks about exercising while being pregnant ("Does your husband know you ran a 5K? Isn't he mad at you?", etc).

My only dislike concerns the medical jargon and scientific documentation which can be lengthy and tiresome to read- especially of you are exhausted from being pregnant. However this type of writing may actually give a much deeper understanding of what the medical community knows and does not know and while I found it somewhat tiring my husband quite enjoyed it.
Arihelm
A dry read, but very information and straight to the point. I would recommend for any pregnant mother interested in how exercise affects the overall pregnancy and delivery.
Coiril
This is a good read for anyone who is a serious athlete, or for anyone who competes, or even a recreational athlete. It answers so many questions, and gives research-based guidelines for exercise in pregnancy. I'm a runner/triathlete, now 24 weeks pregnant with my 11th baby, childbirth educator, and doula (started running/triathlon between baby #9 and baby #10, scaled way back on exercise during 10th pregnancy). What I learned in this book made me feel motivated to continue with my running and triathlon training, and even step it up a bit if I feel like it. I feel better than ever about the way I'm exercising after having read this, and I have research-based responses to give if anyone questions or shows concern for me exercising while pregnant.

Update: I ran all the way through pregnancy #11, completing a sprint triathlon 10 days before the birth, and doing a 2-mile run the day before the birth (38w4d). Of course, at that point, I looked like an elephant loping down the road, I'm sure. I felt great all through my pregnancy, just like I was pregnant in my early 20s again, not like I was in my mid-30s! Unfortunately, I had my first c-section with this baby, as I had an unexplained fever and my baby's heartrate was in the 205-215 bpm range. Baby is fine, praise God! I am still grateful that I decided to exercise and eat right (Brewer Pregnancy Diet) through my pregnancy, because the surgery went smoothly and my recovery, even from a cesarean, was much better than it would have been if I was sedentary and eating poorly. My surgeon said my skin and tissues were perfect as she repaired me. I think my being healthy made her job a lot easier, and my surgery a lot less risky for me. I really appreciate the upper-body strength I had worked hard for the day of the surgery. I relied on my strong arms just to pull myself into an upright position in bed, because I couldn't use my abdominal muscles at all. I was able to start walking within a few days, about 2/10ths of a mile at first, and by about 2-3 weeks, I was able to walk a mile or so, slowly. I was biking short distances (maybe up to 3-4 miles) by 3-4 weeks post-op, and run/walking (about 2 miles) at 5-6 weeks. It was really tough to wait to heal during the first 6 weeks, but it was amazing how fast I bounced back after the initial 6 weeks were up. After the first 6 weeks, I was able to really train again, and didn't feel the scar at all.