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by Ellen Archer,Gina Kolata

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Author: Ellen Archer,Gina Kolata
ISBN: 160252923X
Language: English
Category: Diets & Weight Loss
Publisher: Findaway World; Unabridged edition (December 1, 2007)
Rating: 4.7
Formats: lrf doc mbr lrf
FB2 size: 1158 kb | EPUB size: 1903 kb | DJVU size: 1482 kb

Rethinking Thin: The New Science of Weight Loss-and the Myths and Realities of Dieting

Rethinking Thin: The New Science of Weight Loss-and the Myths and Realities of Dieting. In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer Gina Kolata shows that our society's obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals.

Gina Kolata, science reporter for the New York Times, has the unusual journalistic integrity to state something that no one wants to hear: that it is almost impossible for most fat people to lose significant amounts of weight. She takes us through one specific study, and mentions scores of others, as she decimates the claims of the diet industry and so many health professionals.

In this eye-opening audiobook, "New York Times" science writer Kolata shows that societys obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals. In this eye-opening audiobook, "New York Times" science writer Kolata shows that societys obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals.

Rethinking Thin book. In this eye-opening book, "New York Times" science writer Gina Kolata shows that our society's obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals.

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The New Science of Weight Loss-and the Myths and Realities of Dieting. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Gina Kolata is a science writer for The New York Times and the author of five previous books, including Ultimate Fitness and the national bestseller Flu. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer Gina Kolata shows that our society's obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping . 7 3 5 Autor: Gina Kolata Narrador: Ellen Archer. Disponible como audiolibro.

In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer Gina Kolata shows that our society's obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends.

In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer Gina Kolata shows that our society's obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Rethinking Thin: The New Science of Weight Loss--And the Myths and Realities of Dieting Kolata Gina Random House (USA) 9781400134502 : In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer. 2007 Язык: ENG Размер: 1. 5 x 1. 2 x . 4 cm Поставляется из: США Описание: In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer Gina Kolata shows that our societys obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals.

This book will change your thinking about weight, whether you struggle with it or not.' -Publishers Weekly Review In this eye-opening book, New York Times science writer Gina Kolata shows that our society's obsession with dieting and weight loss is less about keeping trim and staying healthy than about money, power, trends, and impossible ideals. Rethinking Thin is at once an account of the place of diets in American society and a provocative critique of the weight-loss industry. Kolata's account of four determined dieters' progress through a study comparing the Atkins diet to a conventional low-calorie one becomes a broad tale of science and society, of social mores and social sanctions, and of politics and power. Rethinking Thin asks whether words like willpower are really applicable when it comes to eating and body weight. It dramatizes what it feels like to spend a lifetime struggling with one's weight and fantasizing about finally, at long last, getting thin. It tells the little-known story of the science of obesity and the history of diets and dieting. And it offers commonsense answers to questions about weight, eating habits, and obesity giving us a better understanding of the weight that is right for our bodies. An incisive, thought-provoking examination of a subject that concerns us all. This book will educate and illuminate those seeking solid information about the struggle to lose weight. -Dr. Jerome Groopman, author of How Doctors Think
Comments (7)
Yar
I was not really interested in a book on weight loss, but I read and enjoyed Kolata's Ultimate Fitness, so when I saw this volume on the bookstore shelf, I bought it too.

However, I have to say that Rethinking Thin truly DID make me rethink my assumptions about overweight people. To come clean, I am a thin person from a thin family who always felt that one's weight was a matter of self-control, and I absorbed society's prejudices that fat people were somehow lazy and undisciplined. After reading Rethinking Thin, my attitude has completely changed. I now look at overweight people with compassion and understanding, as victims of the incompatibility of their genetically-determined biochemistry and society's narrow concepts of beauty. I now regard obesity the same way as I do baldness -- it's simply bad luck -- a genetic short straw that is in no way reflective of some kind of character flaw.

Kolata's book begins with a survey of the long history of dieting (not a recent phenomenon) and a history of evolution of the ideal body image. She then describes numerous studies involving identical twins and adoptees which demonstrate the inconvenient truth that body weight is an inherited trait and not a function of environment. She cites an interesting study where thin people where overfed to become fat (very hard to do, it turns out) and obese people were slimmed down to the same size, and the subjects were compared metabolically. I found these chapters fascinating.

The second half of the book gets rather technical, with detailed chapters about biochemistry and the search for an appetite-suppressing hormone. (I found this interesting but glazed over a few times, I admit...) The book closes with a chapter called Fat Wars, where Kolata discusses the politics of the "obesity epidemic" and why legitimate studies which make clear that body weight is a function of genetics are ignored by the weight-loss establishment.

Interspersed between all these chapters are personal stories of a group of individual dieters enrolled in a University of Pennsylvania diet study, and their repeated and futile attempts at significant sustained weight loss. These people are sympathetic and articulate and provide a human counterpart to all the scientific content in the book.

I don't know how someone hoping to lose weight would react to this book. Perhaps it would be a depressing read, as it becomes clear that the only way a significantly overweight person can maintain a "normal" weight is to live the rest of his/her life in a state of semi-starvation with no relief, EVER. However, it might be a liberating read as well, as it finally absolves the overweight from the guilt that it's really all their fault, and that everyone can be thin if they really try hard enough.
Nikobar
Gina Kolata, science reporter for the New York Times, has the unusual journalistic integrity to state something that no one wants to hear: that it is almost impossible for most fat people to lose significant amounts of weight. She takes us through one specific study, and mentions scores of others, as she decimates the claims of the diet industry and so many health professionals. The hard truths she demonstrates are that the great majority of people who do lose a fair amount of weight at some point are not able to keep it off over time, that people who say that obesity issues "need more study" are largely motivated by an unwillingness to accept the conclusions of a vast number of studies already conducted, and that there is tremendous money to be made in giving false hope to the obese. There's a memorable bit towards the end of the book where she shares with a colleague the results of the study she focuses on, and he asks, with something of a sneer, of the participants, "Did they really try?" She is exasperated by this attitude. Yes, they tried. My God, how they tried. This book is a soul-balming antidote to the arrogant narcissism of those who believe their genetic good fortune is actually a manifestation of moral superiority.
Enditaling
Really important information presented here. Kolata explains clearly, using research findings, not wishful thinking, exactly why the whole notion that being fat reflects a personality flaw is wrong. Likewise why the belief that, with reasonable effort, most fat people could become slim and stay that way. I had studied the obesity literature in depth in the 1970's, so I was familiar with many of the findings that Kolata presents. However, what was new for me was the biochemical discoveries made since the 70's. In this section the author discusses research with genetically modified mice or rats. These findings are fascinating; however I doubt that they are relevant to the majority of fat people (who are, after all, not rats and not genetically modified). Despite this criticism I give the book five stars because it presents material of such importance --truly life-saving and culture-altering if enough readers think honestly about they've read here.
generation of new
If nothing else, this book makes you stop and examine your pre-conceived notions about the "obesity epidemic" and demonstrates that the science of weight loss is not as black-and-white and definitive as we're led to believe. This book is also not a major "fat advocacy" book, which makes it accessible to anyone who has at least a reasonably open mind to consider the evidence on the topic. The author is never preachy or tells you how to think, nor does she deny the complexity of the problem. The ideas certainly are contrarian in today's climate, but I think that the more people look behind the curtain, more material like this will emerge.
Adrierdin
This is a timely book does a good job of covering the topic needs to be discussed. It is engagingly written and based on science that seems well founded. I am not sure that the author's conclusions are correct, but I would say that about any book that I have ever seen that discusses diet, obesity and health. This is inherently contentious topic, and Gina Kolkata's book is well worth reading as part of understanding it.
Drelalen
Not what I wanted to hear, but still glad I read the book. It made me think of when African Americans struggled to pass as white because they lived in a society that didn't value them. So many of us struggle to make ourselves be what we can not be. Time to get mad and demand change. Everyone should read this. Especially thin people who feel falsely superior simply because they have a different metabolism.