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by Donald Watson,Yves Navarre

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Author: Donald Watson,Yves Navarre
ISBN: 1564784444
Language: English
Pages: 220 pages
Category: Literature & Fiction
Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press; Translation edition (May 1, 2006)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: doc rtf lrf lrf
FB2 size: 1267 kb | EPUB size: 1983 kb | DJVU size: 1822 kb

Yves Navarre's (1940-1994) first book, Lady Black, was published in 1971. Butas I read through SWEET TOOTH it's clear that good taste wasn't Yves Navarre's forte.

Yves Navarre's (1940-1994) first book, Lady Black, was published in 1971. In 1980, he won France's most esteemed literary award, the Prix Goncourt. Series: French Literature. His strengths include his horrifying imagination, in which Luc's gradual torture and mental dismantling by his pickup are brilliantly evoked, as though James Purdy had written the scenario to Pasolini's "SALO.

He studied Spanish, English, and French literature at the University of Lille, earning degrees in 1961 and 1964.

In a New York as gritty and brutal as Charles Bukowski's Los Angeles-a. He studied Spanish, English, and French literature at the University of Lille, earning degrees in 1961 and 1964. The following year, he studied at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales du Nord. He then worked for an ad agency as a creative writer.

By (author) Yves Navarre, Translated by Donald Watson Yves Navarre (September 24, 1940 - January 24, 1994) was a French writer

By (author) Yves Navarre, Translated by Donald Watson. Sweet Tooth is a book of anonymous sexual encounters and of lust that grades into love: a story by one of the most brilliantly uncompromising innovators of gay literature that shocks with candor and builds to an incredible climax. Its last line-"Adventure is dead"-grounds everything that has come before and gives a conclusive, melancholy tone to a book that is much more than shocking. Yves Navarre (September 24, 1940 - January 24, 1994) was a French writer. A gay man, most of his work concerned homosexuality and associated issues, such as AIDS.

Sweet Tooth (French Literature), Yves Navarre, Good Book.

Sweet Tooth is a novel by the English writer Ian McEwan, published on 21 August 2012. It deals with the experiences of its protagonist, Serena Frome, during the early 1970s. When she becomes romantically involved with her mark, complications ensue.

27 results for yves navarre. Poudre d'or : roman by Yves Navarre Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. by Navarre, Yves Paperback. List price Previous priceEUR 1. 1. the Garden of Acclimation (Set of 2 Books of Yves Navarre).

org thanks Donald Watson for lighting up the path. La Basconnaise – the vegan salad of Louis Rimbault & many vegan French anarchists ~ 100+ years ago.

Author Watson, Donald. Categories: Nonfiction. 7/10 1. Books by Watson, Donald: The Poetical Works of Donald Watson : With Memoir.

Sweet Tooth, his new novel, is definitely mature McEwan, intermittently funny and much more sweet than bitter, about as entertaining as a very intelligent novel can be and vice versa

Sweet Tooth, his new novel, is definitely mature McEwan, intermittently funny and much more sweet than bitter, about as entertaining as a very intelligent novel can be and vice versa. Even though the story is set inside a cold war espionage operation, no violence occurs - indeed, only one (secondary) character dies, of natural causes, and only after he’s exited the story. Although she took the orthodox view of our generation concerning the Vietnam War, the fiction she reads turns her into a young anti-Communist in the soft-on-­Communism academia of the early ’70s. I was also the first person in the world to understand Orwell’s ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four.

com's Yves Navarre Page and shop for all Yves Navarre books. Sweet Tooth (French Literature). by Yves Navarre and Donald Watson. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Yves Navarre.

In a New York as gritty and brutal as Charles Bukowski's Los Angeles--a city of muggings, cockroach-infested apartments, dank hospitals, and casual murders--three characters cross paths and collide. Sweet Tooth is a book of anonymous sexual encounters and of lust that grades into love: a story by one of the most brilliantly uncompromising innovators of gay literature that shocks with candor and builds to an incredible climax. Its last line--"Adventure is dead"--grounds everything that has come before and gives a conclusive, melancholy tone to a book that is much more than shocking.

Comments (2)
Taulkree
If I had to come up with a brief description, I'd say that SWEET TOOTH is like equal parts of Capote and Faulkner mixed together in a jar and garnished with Polanski's REVULSION. All my favorite things as one, what joy!
It's not a simple read, but it's never boring, and always delectable. I liked sampling the short chapters tightly packed with exquisite writing a couple at a time—much like turkish delights, referenced in the original French title,—and then, when the novel ended, they all came spinning together in surreal, satisfying cacophony.
Dianaghma
Navarre lists his own characters with the detached observation of a book reviewer and suggests a way to look at the plot of his novel to boot (p. 62): "Luc, thirty-three years old, a played-out journalist; Rasky, forty-seven years old, an overblown playboy; Lucy, forty-nine years old, a typist who has gone adrift; here in one act of forty chapters is an account of their attempt to run away from themselves." The book is a grim, unsparing allegory in which no character, at least no one French, will ever find happiness in New York, and thus it seems like a cautionary tale, and it certainly leaves one with the squeamish feeling that the next time you feel like having abandoned sex on the west side piers of Manhattan, don't. Just stay at home. Of course the piers are largely a closed chapter in gay New York history, and the scenes in which Luc wanders like a lonely cloud with his fly unzipped to reveal his white briefs to strangers, and comb the docks for anonymous sex, have a period charm Navarre (who died in 1994) could not have imagined during his lifetime.

If the copy from Dalkey Archive can be credited, Newsday says that SWEET TOOTH is "a universally appealing tale about the difficulty of finding and keeping relationships." That has to be one of the most bizarre summings up of a book I have ever read! Rasky is dying of syphilis, which Navarre annoyingly personalizes as "Dame Syphy," and Luc comes to visit him from France. The two of them reminisce about lovers they've had and lovers they expect to have if they live.

Luc meets a man of mixed race, half Puerto-Rican, half black, who works in a florist shop, and goes home with him. Big mistake. Maybe the mistake was calling him "Chocolate," as an endearment, that would enrage anyone. Butas I read through SWEET TOOTH it's clear that good taste wasn't Yves Navarre's forte. His strengths include his horrifying imagination, in which Luc's gradual torture and mental dismantling by his pickup are brilliantly evoked, as though James Purdy had written the scenario to Pasolini's "SALO." He's not very good at portraying women, if the typist Lucy is any indication. All she does of interest is go to the premiere of a Broadway musical called, "Pepper," a typical 70s flop, but one featuring a big title number Ethan Mordden would crack wise over, one in which the chorus boys and girls shout over and over again, "Pepper! Pepper! Pepper!" a la Jerry Herman's MAME or DOLLY.

I'd rate it higher except for Donald Watson's tepid translation. Did Watson do this translation recently? I have the feeling Dalkey Archive is fobbing us off with an old piece of British crud. The UKisms in the text are glaring, "storey" for the floors in a building, "pants" for briefs or whatever, and so on and so forth amen.

"Is your novel autobiographical," asks one New Yorker. "My novel is exobiographical: I drive out all those characters inside me who refuse to remain anonymous." Whatever the pros and cons of SWEET TOOTH, it is not a "universally appealing tale about the difficulty of finding and keeping relationships."