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by Walter G. Meyer

Download Rounding Third fb2
Author: Walter G. Meyer
ISBN: 0982513208
Language: English
Pages: 274 pages
Category: Literature & Fiction
Publisher: MaxM Ltd (June 29, 2009)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: docx lit lrf lrf
FB2 size: 1940 kb | EPUB size: 1320 kb | DJVU size: 1553 kb

I've read a lot of books about gay teens and bullying, but Walter Meyer paints such a vivid picture of the psychological trauma that Josh undergoes in a way I haven't witnessed.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). I've read a lot of books about gay teens and bullying, but Walter Meyer paints such a vivid picture of the psychological trauma that Josh undergoes in a way I haven't witnessed. And though the circumstances Josh has to deal with are horrific, they are entirely realistic. Meyer's ability to describe everything that Josh endures hits the reader's heart without veering into the melodramatic.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Walter G. Meyer's books. Walter G. Meyer’s Followers (9). Walter’s Bookshelves.

The Respectful Leader: Seven Ways to Influence Without Intimidation by. Gregg Ward, Walter G. Meyer (Goodreads Author) (With). Safe at Third by. Meyer (Goodreads Author).

Rounding Third was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award & a finalist for a San Diego Book Award.

Rob Wardell is a seventeen-year old who feels like he doesn't quite fit in anywhere-not at home, not at school and not on the baseball field. Rounding Third was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award & a finalist for a San Diego Book Award. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Meyer, Walter G. It was embarrassing to have Josh watch him be bitch-slapped, but Taylor did it again and again. Poulan and Brickman each grabbed one of Rob’s arms as though he needed to be restrained or might fight. Taylor hit him in the face again, this time with a closed fist. Taylor stepped aside and Jason Farino stepped in to take his turn at bat. He hit Rob in the stomach, but his fist ricocheted off and Rob could tell it stung his hand. Omar Rivera shoved Jason out of the way and took his best shot smacking Rob in the face.

Rounding Third author Walter G. Meyer is gearing up for his . Meyer is gearing up for his October speaking tour to talk about his book and bullying. Walter G Meyer, writer of books, screenplays, novels, plays and for newspapers and magazines, including Rounding Third, a gay high school baseball novel about bullying and suicide; and GAM3RS, a comedy play about online role-playing games.

Rob Wardell is a seventeen-year old who feels like he doesn't quite fit in anywhere-not at home, not at school and not on the baseball field

Rob Wardell is a seventeen-year old who feels like he doesn't quite fit in anywhere-not at home, not at school and not on the baseball field. The small, shy boy stays on the high school baseball team only to please his father since he knows he will never get to play.

The book started like a fairy tale, about a boy falling for his crush and realizing that his interest was returned affectionately by his crush too. But within the happy tale, ugly secrets and.

Walter Meyer is the Author of Rounding Third . Going for the Green: Selling in the21st Century is a business book in the form of a novel which teaches the right way to sell.

Walter Meyer is the Author of Rounding Third, a novel that has been nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. Meyer began his writing career when he won a short-story contest when he was in the fourth grade. He turned pro when he started freelancing for the local newspaper when he was in ninth grade covering topics ranging from JFK’s assassination to the high school baseball team while he was a member of that team. He wrote for the Daily Collegian at Penn State.

Articles by Walter G Meyer author of Rounding Third . Walt’s Walt is also the author of novels Rounding Third, Going for the Green, and Day is Ending, penned numerous articles, and is co-creator of GAM3RS, The Play. Accolades for Walt’s Talks. The feedback I received was amazing from some of my colleagues who followed up your school assembly presentation in their classes.

Rob Wardell is a seventeen-year old who feels like he doesn't quite fit in anywhere--not at home, not at school and not on the baseball field. The small, shy boy stays on the high school baseball team only to please his father since he knows he will never get to play. He's living his life alone until he finds himself drawn into a friendship with the team's new star pitcher, Josh Schlagel. The two boys hit it off instantly; maybe it's because Josh isn't exactly welcomed by the team either. But as Rob and Josh grow closer and start spending more time together away from the field, Rob realizes this his friend is hiding something. The bruises on Josh's body and his reluctance to let Rob know about certain parts of his life have Rob suspicious. When Josh's secrets are finally revealed and become life threatening, Rob and his family must step up to the plate.
Comments (7)
Hidden Winter
First of all let me say I'm not a baseball fan but I figured I'd give this story a shot anyway - it did not disappoint! The characters are believeable and likeable - you grow to care more about them as the story goes on and without too much forward and backward we see the main characters evolve by the end of the book.
The horrors of rape and the confusion of sex and desire - gay or otherwise - get covered in this book in a respectful and well done way without the preaching and saccharin we see all too often in other volumes that attempt to do what Mr.Meyer has done here. I do recommend this for any of you who might be interested in a reasonable "study" of homosexuality and teen boys and high school sports. It is not a perfect thing but it is well worth the time.
Jesmi
An outcast on his baseball team, unable to carry a conversation with anyone other than his sister, Meg, and constantly succumbing to a workout routine in the middle of the night, Rob Wardell knows he's "different." Bullied by the built homophobic members of his team, Rob has gotten used to sitting on the sidelines and taking it. It's nothing short of a miracle that he befriends Josh Schlagel, a new kid who joins the team. Although things are a little awkward at first due to Rob's shy nature, the two of them grow close, and this new friendship proves life changing for the both of them. But a sexual encounter transforms their friendship, and soon Rob finds himself taking on Josh's trauma, instilled by his parents and his peers.

I've read a lot of books about gay teens and bullying, but Walter Meyer paints such a vivid picture of the psychological trauma that Josh undergoes in a way I haven't witnessed. And though the circumstances Josh has to deal with are horrific, they are entirely realistic. Meyer's ability to describe everything that Josh endures hits the reader's heart without veering into the melodramatic. And watching Josh deteriorate further and further into himself is part of what makes the book so engaging and gut-wrenching.

These characters are extremely well-written. Little details like Meg's penchant of punching Josh in the stomach when he embarrasses her, or Rob's routine of doing sit-ups in the middle of the night to quell his arousal give the characters more dimensions. You care about what happens to them, and you feel the depression that weighs down on everyone in the really trying moments. That's what makes this novel such a fantastic read. Because you feel so much for the characters, you feel the psychological effects of bullying and Meyer's message hits that much harder.

The ending of the novel was a pleasant surprise, painting the most realistic end to the story. I won't spoil anything, but I will say the book does not disappoint in its final moments, staying just as well-written and captivating as the story's beginning.

"Rounding Third" was a brilliant read, and I eagerly look forward to the upcoming sequel. This is one of my favorite books I have read, and one of the most realistic portrayals of the physical and psychological damage caused by bullying.
Road.to sliver
I suppose some people will find their credulity being strained by the events in this book. In the afterword of the book the author states:"if you doubt the underlying truths of this story ..." implying that some people might find it hard to believe the catalog of physical and verbal abuse suffered by gay students in this story, especially that perpetrated by parents towards their own children. Oddly, I never doubted the verisimilitude of the "bad things" that took place. What seemed a stretch to me was the warmth and supportive understanding of Bobby's family and the few other individuals who went out of their way to be kind. It's nice to know that some kids do find support as they try to deal with all the hate.

It's been what seems like several centuries since I went through the hell of high school, but I still got a major cathartic rush from reading this well written (if slightly soap-operatic) story. I'm glad I read it ... in only two sittings ... but felt somewhat exhausted by the roller coaster emotional ride no matter how predictable the path it took.

It definitely evoked suppressed memories of the confusion, the constant doubts, the need for secrecy, the aloneness, the occasional moments of happiness that inevitably presaged far more moments of pain & self-loathing ... all jam-packed into a mental school yearbook that is impossible to ever discard. While this book managed to resurrect some of those painful thoughts, it may also have helped to lay some of them to rest. I guess we emerge from the experience either stronger, as did Robby, or with a form of permanently debilitating post-traumatic stress, like Josh.

I find it disturbing to realize that, despite what popular media suggests, things are not much better now than they were in the Dark Ages when I went to high school. And, thanks to the warped political agenda of people like Michele Bachman and the religious right, the justification for these acts of hatred against vulnerable teens seems not to have diminished.

A good read, but keep a large box of tissues at hand. It wasn't the painful experience that got to me, but the acts of kindness.
Hǻrley Quinn
High school life for gay teenagers, first affection, turning into first love - basket ball and jock culture, bullying to the extent of physical abuse and criminal assaults. A very intense description of America's anti-gay rural (very rural and cruel) sport culture. Throw in some extreme-religious parenting, and you have a pretty explosive, but sadly also real mixture of feelings and believes. The novel even touches on the events of recent high-school shootings. - - it's a great read for you if you care about young adults, what some of them have to go through while growing up, figuring themselves and the world around them out, building relationships and trying to fit in. ... It's a page turner, tear jerker. An intense, gut wrenching, but amazing read. (While I personally couldn't relate to the base-ball nitty-gritty details at the first half of the book, I found the last couple chapters too rushed, - therefore only 4 out of 5 stars.)