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by Jeanette Winterson

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Author: Jeanette Winterson
ISBN: 0802135161
Language: English
Pages: 176 pages
Category: Literature & Fiction
Publisher: Grove Press (August 20, 1997)
Rating: 4.3
Formats: lit doc lrf rtf
FB2 size: 1456 kb | EPUB size: 1500 kb | DJVU size: 1536 kb

Jeanette Winterson is the author of Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, The Passion, Sexing the Cherry, Written on the Body . The Passion (Miramax Films). Oranges are not. The only fruit.

Jeanette Winterson is the author of Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, The Passion, Sexing the Cherry, Written on the Body, Art and Lies, Gut Symmetries, The World and Other Places and a collection of essays, Art Objects. Also by jeanette winterson.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a novel by Jeanette Winterson published in 1985, which she subsequently adapted into a BBC television drama of the same name. It is a coming-of-age story about a lesbian girl who grows up in an English Pentecostal community. Key themes of the book include transition from youth to adulthood, complex family relationships, same-sex relationships, and religion.

Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the bizarre outposts of religious .

Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the bizarre outposts of religious excess and human obsession. Across the novel’s eight chapters, Winterson follows a fictionalized version of herself, Jeanette, as she grows up in a strict, working-class Protestant household; in plain but incisive prose, the author considers the teen girl’s struggle to reconcile her sexuality with her faith, charts the highs and lows of her first romances An unassuming coming-of-age tale about love, religion, and repression, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit conducts a moving psychological study of a young British lesbian.

My mother had never heard of mixed feelings. There were friends and there were enemies. Enemies were the Devil, Next Door and Sex. Friends were God and That's It. She was Old Testament through and through and deeply resentful Mary had beaten her to a Virgin birth. So she did the next best thing and had a foundling. Me. Oh, Little Town of Manchester how still we see thee lie. My father? You can forget about him. He's a man. Once upon a time there was a beautiful princess who liked to interpolate her story with myth because she did not trust the readers to understand the metafiction

Innovative, punchy and tender, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a few days ride into the bizarre outposts of religious excess and human obsession. A novel that deserves revisitin. interson maintains a balance of tone, a trueness of voic. t remains one of the finest things Winterson has written’ Observer. Even at a time when so many good and interesting novels are coming out, hers stand out as performances of real originality and extraordinary promise’ John.

Jeannette Winterson's autobiographical first novel, "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit," won a Whitbread Prize for a First Novel when it came out in 1985, but I'm not sure it would now. Winterson writes beautifully, but the novel doesn't really hold together and to me felt like it wasn't finished. It would be unfair to label "Oranges" as a coming out novel because it is far more delicate and thoughtful than that. Better to think of it as a autobiographical bildingsroman like "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. If you're looking for lurid sex scenes,.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. For when Jeanette Winterson looks at works as diverse as the "Mona Lisa" and Virginia Woolf's "The Waves," she fr. The World and Other Places: Stories. by Jeanette Winterson. Her first short story collection exhibits the multitude of talents that have made English novelist Jeanette Winterson not just admired but beloved by her many fans.

Jeanette Winterson was born in Manchester, England in 1959 and graduated from St. Catherine's College, Oxford. The book was the winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction and was made into an award-winning TV movie. The Passion won the John Llewelyn Rhys Memorial Prize for best writer under thirty-five, and Sexing the Cherry won the American Academy of Arts and Letters' E. M. Forster Award.

Winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a coming-out novel from Winterson, the acclaimed author of The Passion and Sexing the Cherry. The narrator, Jeanette, cuts her teeth on the knowledge that she is one of God’s elect, but as this budding evangelical comes of age, and comes to terms with her preference for her own sex, the peculiar balance of her God-fearing household crumbles.
Comments (7)
Qwne
A girl is adopted into a very conservative Christian family, the mother being a functionally mentally ill person who lives for the church, and is forced to come out as gay while being emotionally, and physically tortured by the church, her mother, the pastor, and everyone around her. At times funny, at times brutally sad, it's an interesting look at one woman's path to being herself while fighting those around her.
Unh
Sometimes I think it's a huge advantage for a writer to grow up in weird or even miserable circumstances. A normal, happy childhood produces normal, well-adjusted minds while misery and strangeness, while suffocating some, gives the putative writer not only an original outlook on life but also a lifetime of material to mine.

Jeanette Winterson had a truly strange childhood and emerged as a truly talented writer with an original and authentic voice that is heard on every page of this poetic and compelling memoir.

Winterson was adopted by a working class couple living in a poor town in northern England. Her father was a quiet, self-effacing man and is practically a non-presence in this book. Her mother dominates every page. A fundamentalist Christian and neglectful and sometimes cruel mother, she devoted herself wholly to her weird strain of Christianity. Winterson expected to follow in her path and became an enthusiastic evangelizer and preacher in her own right -- but her sexuality got in the way. Neither her mother nor her church could accept her lesbian identity and Jeanette was ultimately forced to leave the safety of the cult and find her own way.

There is a dogged but subtle working class humor in this book but it is always tinged with sadness. Winterson never quite rejects her upbringing -- in some ways she seems to long for it in all its nuttiness. But she cannot go against who she is, nor can she regard herself as evil.

Mixed into the narrative, full of colorful characters masterfully evoked, are poetic reworkings on fairy tales and legends that cast a light and a shadow on the story. Winterson has a real ear for dialogue which brings her northern folk to life.

Much of my reading consists unfortunately of cookie-cutter books that are put together either well or not so well but ultimately nearly all turn out to be forgettable. This one is unforgettable.
Rolorel
Jeannette Winterson's autobiographical first novel, "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit," won a Whitbread Prize for a First Novel when it came out in 1985, but I'm not sure it would now. Winterson writes beautifully, but the novel doesn't really hold together and to me felt like it wasn't finished.

It would be unfair to label "Oranges" as a coming out novel because it is far more delicate and thoughtful than that. Better to think of it as a autobiographical bildingsroman like "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn." If you're looking for lurid sex scenes, this is not the book for you. Instead it is an often hilarious account of religious zealots living in a slum in northwest England. Winterson writes reflectively about about her alter-ego's growing awareness of who she is and what will be her relationship to her religion, her family (mostly her mother), and her community.

Winterson starts interspersing fables into the narrative as her character becomes more aware of her difference. I found these unnecessary and distracting. To me they felt like filler for what is a fairly short novel. I would have been happier with the narrative without them and would probably have given the novel an extra star if she'd left them out. But the through story is a good read.
Hellmaster
I read "Oranges are not the only Fruit" after reading Jeanette's other book "Why be Happy if you could be Normal?", because I enjoyed the other book. This one was not as entertaining and became rather tedious towards the end, but it had the same dogged determination to succeed which was a feature of "Why be Happy", and the same quirky sense of humour. I think this book placed too much emphasis on her struggles to come to terms with her lesbianism, whereas her childhood battles with adversity and her treatment by her cruel adoptive mother were to me the main obstacles she had to overcome - after being thrown out of the house and forced to sleep in a car and to support herself as a young teenager, she had already shown that she had impressive survival skills and an independent streak. It is not surprising that her experiences of rejection led to depression, and she describes her battle with mental illness with insight and frankness. A memorable book which stayed with me for a long time, and left me wanting to know more about her life story.
Precious
When I first read "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit" I fell in love with Winterson's witty and humorous depictions of a rigid traditional christian household in an ever evolving modern society. Upon a second read, I fell in love with Winterson's intrinsic characterizations and complex depictions of relationships. Upon my third read, I appreciated the work for its analysis of society and the way thought operates in this world. I am currently writing my thesis comparing Winterson's "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit" and "Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?" while analyzing the connections between healing through writing. I could not have asked to work with more interesting and well written material.
Kupidon
Interesting read - hard to get into a first and the author can be somewhat self-indulgent, but her poetic style can also be very honest and beautiful.
ZEr0
The book is full of imagination, humor and whimsy. It is well written and formidable in thoughtfulness. I didn't expect that it would be more of a caricature of religion than a balanced memoir of it, but perhaps that was naive of me. The only reason I didn't give five stars was that one. A very good read!
The main character has a strong, interesting voice that switches between fantasy and memoir. Her story draws the reader in and shows the painful life of a young girl growing up and breaking free from a mother consumed by fanatical religious views. I enjoyed the unexpected humor and the unique personality of the main character.