» » The Crimson Sword (Legend of Asahiel, Book 1)

Download The Crimson Sword (Legend of Asahiel, Book 1) fb2

by Eldon Thompson

Download The Crimson Sword (Legend of Asahiel, Book 1) fb2
Author: Eldon Thompson
ISBN: 0060741511
Language: English
Category: United States
Publisher: Harper Voyager; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (April 25, 2006)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: mbr lit txt docx
FB2 size: 1545 kb | EPUB size: 1811 kb | DJVU size: 1611 kb
Sub: Fiction

The Crimson Sword by Eldon Thompson is the first book in the Legend of Asahiel trilogy. The second book is titled the Obsidian Key, the third book is scheduled for release in August 2008 is titled the Divine Talisman

The Crimson Sword by Eldon Thompson is the first book in the Legend of Asahiel trilogy. The second book is titled the Obsidian Key, the third book is scheduled for release in August 2008 is titled the Divine Talisman. This is Mr. Thompson's first foray into the land that is authorship and as such there are bound to be some bumps along the way, but as with most fantasy debut authors, I was willing to give it a shot.

The Crimson Sword book. The Age of Man has begun  . For a Demon Queen has awakened from the abyss - and humankind is about to discover its powerlessness in the face of the ancient terrors of the world.

Book one of the legend of asahiel. Only in Alson, the Shadow thought, where the king’s penchant for lurid tales and unrestrained revelry was the stuff of legend. TERRY BROOKS for showing me how it’s done even if I haven’t learned a thing. It was said that no ruler in history knew better how to sate the base urges of himself and his exclusive guests than old King Sorl. His was a large and wealthy land, built on his father’s efforts, and it was not in Sorl’s nature to worry about cost or consequence.

Mobile version (beta). Eldon Thompson - The Legend of Asahiel 01 - The Crimson Sword. Download (txt, . 4 Mb) Donate Read. EPUB FB2 PDF MOBI RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Eldon Thompson (born May 6, 1974) is a professional author and screenwriter known for his epic fantasy series The Legend of Asahiel, published by HarperCollins (Eos/HarperVoyager). His debut novel, The Crimson Sword, was released in 2005, followed by The Obsidian Key in 2006 and The Divine Talisman in 2008. After a ten-year hiatus, a spinoff series featuring the character of Kylac Kronus was published in 2018 by Cyndyn.

The Age of Man has begun.

Praise for this book. Eldon Thompson wields more than just a little magic in his debut novel. Similar books by other authors.

Book Description The Age of Man has begun. Gone are the elves and dwarves, orcs and trolls, and other creatures of legend

Book Description The Age of Man has begun. Gone are the elves and dwarves, orcs and trolls, and other creatures of legend. Having driven the "undesirables" from their lands, the kingdoms of the island continent of Pentania have started a new chapter inhu. Having driven the "undesirables" from their lands, the kingdoms of the island continent of Pentania have started a new chapter inhuman history.

Book in the The Legend of Asahiel Series). com User, March 4, 2006. The first page of The Crimson Sword, book one of a new epic trilogy, sinks its teeth deep into your imagination and doesn't ever let go. If you're expecting a typical opening to an epic fantasy trilogy you'll be happily disappointed. The plot takes the unexpected turn every chance it can in the first third.

The undesirable creatures of legend have been driven from their lands, magic has been forsaken, the .

The undesirable creatures of legend have been driven from their lands, magic has been forsaken, the old go. Sci-fi & Fantasy Fantasy. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Age of Man has begun. The "undesirable" creatures of legend have been driven from their lands, magic has been forsaken, the old gods reduced to myth.Now humans will rule the kingdoms of the island continent of Pentania. But they are not alone.

Alson's king has been assassinated, its capital besieged by a malevolent wizard. The chaos and terror now sweeping the land have come to the remote village of Diln -- sending young Jarom far from his home to seek aid against the nefarious usurper. But a mysterious council has decreed Jarom must find one of the mythical Swords of Asahiel -- the divine talismans the elven avatars used to forge the earth -- in order to save a quarrelsome, fledgling humanity. For a Demon Queen has awakened from the abyss -- and humankind is about to discover its powerlessness in the face of the ancient terrors of the world.

Comments (7)
Ubranzac
I decided to read this book after reading Eldon Thompson's short story "Unbowed" in the "Unfettered" Anthology. "Unbowed" was quite good. It's a short story about one of the characters from "The Crimson Sword"...Kylac Cronus. It was engaging, emotion inducing, dramatic, well written and plot focused, and made me want to know even more about the character of Kylac. And then I read "The Crimson Sword"... I've read reviews comparing this series to Tolkien; and after reading it, I'm left wondering if these people have actually ever read Tolkien, or just watched the movies? The writing in "The Crimson Sword" is sophomoric at best: replete with run-on sentences, stilted syntax, and inappropriate use of large words to try and sound intelligent. Also, the plot is thin and random, and the characters are shallow and cartoonish. Even the aforementioned Kylac seems only a caricature of the character in "Unbowed"; and for some odd, unexplained reason, is written with a strange accent that isn't present in the "Unbowed" story. If you like shallow and cartoonish books like the majority of D&D fiction, the you'll enjoy this book. If however, you prefer your books to have some meat to them...some actual depth...then you will be sorely disappointed with this book. Give it and the series a pass.
Brazil
Good story. His writing takes alittle getting use to.
Hucama
the book that got me hooked for the series
Hugifyn
The Crimson Sword by Eldon Thompson is the first book in the Legend of Asahiel trilogy. The second book is titled the Obsidian Key, the third book is scheduled for release in August 2008 is titled the Divine Talisman. This is Mr. Thompson's first foray into the land that is authorship and as such there are bound to be some bumps along the way, but as with most fantasy debut authors, I was willing to give it a shot.

The plot of this book, in a word, is cliché filled. In and of itself, a cliché riddled isn't a bad thing. However, when that plot is not disguised or altered in any way, then it becomes a hindrance. In this book we have several long-standing clichés. Such as; the search for an artifact (the crimson sword) that if found will save the kingdom, and secondly the plot line involving a peasant who is unknowingly is of noble birth. He of course spurns the notion that he can do something to save the kingdom, as he is going through the paces of trying to save the kingdom. There are a couple predictable sub-plots as well, such as; the evil wizard seeking to take over the kingdom, the rampaging monsters that strike fear into the country side and many more sub-plots to round out the novel. In the end when I finished this novel I was left with a feeling of mediocrity. The adage of `been there done that' holds remarkably true for this novel. Any fan of the fantasy genre will surely see many repeated elements in this plot. It is almost as though Mr. Thompson read a bevy of fantasy novels and then selected plot points for this novel and crammed them together to make a story, albeit a very predictable one.

What to say about the characters. Starting with the peasant (unknowingly noble) Jarom to the evil unknown wizard seeking to take over the kingdom, they are all clichés. I have read each and every one of them at some point or another in different novels - most better written then in this novel. Add to that the assassin turned former assassin (but who still kills people) who "somehow" finds himself following Jarom. It just becomes too much to stomach. There are brief attempts at character development scattered throughout this novel, but in almost every case I had the feeling it wasn't so much character development as it was the author trying to make sure a later plot element could/would happen thereby necessitating the small change in a character. One of the things that I found odd, was that even though Jarom is what would be considered a main character, at no point during this book did I ever develop a liking to the character. In fact it was quite the opposite, I didn't like the character at all. He comes across as bland and whiny. I can name hundreds of characters that are more interesting than him, and none of them are from this novel.

Some of the things that I didn't like about this book.

1 - As I mentioned above, the multiple clichés, both plot wise and character wise. I have said it before, if an author opts to use a time honored cliché for either, they much repackage it so that it seems at least somewhat new to the reader. An author can not rely on the belief that if it worked for the previous author it will work for them as well. After a while even the most interesting plot, or character, if repeated enough, becomes uninteresting. That is the case with this book.

2 - The language in the book. I am not talking about cursing our anything like that. What I mean is Mr. Thompson seeks to describe everything, and does. To the point that it sucks all the imagination out of the reader. The reader is left with no option but to only see the authors view in all things. In my opinion, that takes away a good portion of the enjoyability of a book.

3 - Too much flowery language as well. Mr. Thomspon seems to try and make this book more than what it is. I don't mind, once or twice, seeing inside the characters head and knowing what they are thinking. But, in this book, especially with Jarom, it happens over, and over, and over again. To the point where I actually became frustrated with it.

4 - Some of the plot points seem jumpy and contrived. I obviously don't know the degree of planning that went into this story, but some of the plot points lead me to believe that the story changed dramatically as it was being written and the author lost control of the story.

With all that criticism, there were a couple things I liked about this book.

1 - The world seems rich and detailed. From what I learned about the world while reading this book it seems like a world that took some considerable planning and organization.

2 - Mr. Thompson seems to have a decent ability to write, if he reigns in some of the issues I outlined above. Some original ideas, getting rid of some needless description, and I think he can be a successful author.

When all is said ad done, my overall enjoyment while reading this book was very little. I found it often uninteresting and repeated what I had already read in other books. While there are certainly things I liked, they were often outnumbered by things I didn't like and in the end that is what I will remember the most about this novel. I can not, in good conscience, recommend this book to many people. With the wide array of fantasy novels lining the shelves today there are so many other novels that I would recommend long before even thinking of this one. I, for one, will not be reading any further in this series.
Bumand
Thompson has crafted a fast-paced, well-plotted read employing an articulately apt, richly descriptive use of language. He puts these literary skills to work in building a complexly-layered, Tolkien-like world whose determined protagonist earns your support and encouragement to succeed against seemingly unsurmountable odds.
Seevinev
A style of storytelling that sits somewhere between George R.R. Martin and Terry Brooks -- with more magic than Martin and more acid than Brooks... Eldon deals his first hand with a strong command of language and character, inviting you to see a world of Elves and Demons and Magical Swords in his own looking glass, reflecting motifs both familiar and not.
Uaoteowi
After reading a collection of short stories I came across A main character here I immediately switched and picked up this book! Loved it!
This is not George RR Martin, Robin Hobb or Scott Bakker folks. This is Eldon Thompson, and the Crimson Sword is a cleverly written throwback to the classic quest based fantasy books of old. What makes The Crimson Sword stand out, in my opinion, is the fantastic character development. Jarom is an entirely sympathetic character and I very much felt attached to his story. Meanwhile, Allion, Kylac and Marisha are all well written and believable supporting characters. The battle scenes are breath taking and took me by pleasant surprise. But the heart of the story lies with young Jarom, who must battle fate itself.