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by Amanda Boyden

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Author: Amanda Boyden
ISBN: 0307388247
Language: English
Pages: 320 pages
Category: United States
Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (August 11, 2009)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: lrf rtf lit txt
FB2 size: 1812 kb | EPUB size: 1418 kb | DJVU size: 1129 kb
Sub: Fiction

Boyden’s Babylon Rolling is a love letter, sometimes sad, sometimes angry, sometimes beautiful, between New Orleans and five people who live on one of its streets.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Boyden’s Babylon Rolling is a love letter, sometimes sad, sometimes angry, sometimes beautiful, between New Orleans and five people who live on one of its streets. The Globe and Mail (Toronto) It is possible that New Orleans is the perfect setting for the post-9/11 American nove. .Like the characters in the gorgeous and tactile Babylon Rolling, our survival hinges on our ability to cope with the lack of a universal culture and common body politic, the truth that natural disasters and random violence are a fact of life.

Babylon Rolling: A Novel (Vintage Contemporaries) and millions of other books . Few contemporary novels are, at their root, as compelling about the relationship between a city and the people who live there.

Amanda Boyden's second novel, Babylon Rolling, does that for New Orlean.She surprises at every turn, seizing upon the way violence - and joy - can erupt in a moment. The Globe and Mail (Toronto).

Part of Vintage Contemporaries. About Babylon Rolling. Ariel May and her husband, Ed, have just moved to New Orleans with their two small children. Born in Northern Minnesota, Amanda Boyden grew up, the eldest of three daughters, in Chicago and St. Louis

Part of Vintage Contemporaries. Part of Vintage Contemporaries. Category: Literary Fiction. Their neighbor, Fearius, is a fifteen-year-old just out of juvenile detention. Louis. Currently she teaches in the English department of the University of New Orleans.

series Vintage Contemporaries.

Ariel May and her husband, Ed, have just moved to New Orleans with their two small children  . series Vintage Contemporaries.

Babylon Rolling book. Amanda Boyden has a wonderful and varied voice, powerful in its own right and just as powerful when it's playing chameleon

Babylon Rolling book. Ariel May and her husband, Ed, have just moved to New Orleans with. Amanda Boyden has a wonderful and varied voice, powerful in its own right and just as powerful when it's playing chameleon. She does that a lot in this novel, which is about the year leading up to Hurricane Katrina on one street in New Orleans. It's like she's trying to remember the intricacies of The Time Before, everyone's Time Before, good or bad or in between. There is an even mix of loathable and lovable characters, along with a section that's both. One of the best prologues I've ever read.

Amanda Boyden was born in Minnesota and raised in Chicago and St. Formerly a circus trapeze artist and contortionist, she earned her MFA from the University of New Orleans, where she now teaches writing. Her first novel, Pretty Little Dirty was published in 2006. Библиографические данные. Babylon Rolling: A Novel Vintage Contemporaries.

Hurricane Ivan, 2004, Race relations. New York : Pantheon Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on July 1, 2011.

Told in five achingly real voices, Babylon Rolling is the story of one year on Orchid Street, a place where lives clash and collide, and where the humid air is charged with constant wanting. Offering a bold understanding of human nature and the hidden prejudices we harbor, Babylon Rolling is a powerful portrait of racism in America and a city on the edge of transformation. Format Hardback 307 pages. Dimensions 16. 2 x 23. 6 x 3. 2mm 49. 5g. Publication date 05 Aug 2008. Publisher Pantheon Books.

Knopf Doubleday Pantheon Schocken Vintage Books Anchor Books .

Knopf Doubleday Pantheon Schocken Vintage Books Anchor Books Vintage Español Nan A. Talese Everyman’s Library. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group Newsletter. The Times-Picayune calls Amanda Boyden’s Babylon Rolling a brilliant, nuanced portrait of pre-Katrina New Orleans, saying, Once in a great while, a novel comes along that makes you sit up and look around at your world and see it anew, in all its richness and complexity. Just read this excerpt and you’ll be in complete agreement. Or, better yet, if you are in or around New Orleans, hear Amanda Boyden read from the book herself. Fantastic Story - Not just for New Orleans lovers. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Babylon Rolling is an amazing novel. Race relations, class differences and marital relationships are also essential elements of this book.

Ariel May and her husband, Ed, have just moved to New Orleans with their two small children. Their neighbor, Fearius, is a fifteen-year-old just out of juvenile detention. Across the street, an elderly couple, the Browns, are only trying to pass their days in peace, while Philomenia Beauregard de Bruges, a longtime resident and “Uptown lady,” peers through her curtains at the East Indian family next door.With one random accident, a scene of horror across front lawns, the whole neighborhood converges on the sidewalk and the residents of Orchid Street are thrown together, for better and for worse.
Comments (7)
Eta
So I became a fan of Boyden after reading "Pretty Little Dirty" and was stoked when I got this book. However as I kept reading it, I just got more irritated and frustrated with the novel.
First things first, I get that being "edgy" was what Boyden tried to do, but there are many, many, many ways to portray juvenile delinquents without writing in "ebonics" so thick that even reading out loud doesn't help. And seriously, a teenage black boy from a broken, poor home who doesn't speak properly and is a drug dealer and sleeps with girls without a second thought? How stereotypically original. And just because almost every other word he says is the n-word does not make him more hard. If anything it's just reiterating that a white female author should not be writing about the minority culture if all she's going to do is take and see the negatives and roll with them. Almost all the minorities in the story have a huge negative factor about them. The drug dealer brothers, their parents who clearly don't know how to raise children because the boys sisters are pregnant. The older black lady who has a daughter who doesn't know how to raise a child and is resistant to her mother's advice. (Jesus Boyden, have you only been around two black families in your life? There are many, many, many functional black families in existence.) The staff at the hotel that works for the main female character seem completely shady. There's always a sense of mistrust whenever they are mentioned.The novel greatly offended me and I expected something more and better from this author.
Kerahuginn
I can think of perhaps five other books that so consumed my days and then kept me up at night by lamplight. And I can think of no other novel that so beautifully renders in the reader's imagination the city of New Orleans.

Amanda Boyden accomplishes no easy feat in this novel. The novel is told in five distinct voices, and I found myself rooting for and then against and then, once again, for the five protagonists at various points in the story. The characters are incredibly complex. Like anybody else, they are flawed, but they are not without their redemptive merits. And, as Hurricane Katrina gathers force in the Gulf and the book comes to a heartbreaking climax--well, I won't ruin the ending, but I will say that this book will stick with you long after you've put it down (and, if you're reading experience was anything like mine, you'll finish the book about two days after you first picked it up).

My highest possible recommendation.
Detenta
I bought it because I'm a New Orleans native and because it was well received here at Amazon. But as lovely as some of the prose could be, there was just something off key with the story, with its tone, and especially with the dialogue and monologues. At times, I felt that the source material was right out of the HBO series 'The Wire', down to the idea that a black kid out of juvey with drug lord aspirations thinks in terms of chess moves or calls his drugs "the product." Baltimore maybe. New Orleans no way. There is an insane upper crust white woman who keeps a journal filled with sarcastic misobservations of her neighbors a la 'Notes on a Scandal.' These things jar the narrative for me. But what I find most peculiar is the absence of certain standard colloquialisms, particularly those used in the black community and across all wards, that are absolutely missing in this book which is supposed to be a character study of New Orleans. There are certain sayings and expressions a New Orleanian would know without necessarily having much to do with the black community, things a writer with an interested ear would pick up online at the grocery. They are not in the novel at all. How is this possible? On the other hand, the novel consistently uses a vernacular that is not at all particular to New Orleans. It's distracting. [Ok, hol' on an listen up: I been livbin' in New Orleans my hol' life an I ain' neber heard no one talkin' 'bout how they "best do this" or they "best done that", especially no black folks.] The author is a former trapeze artist, a career which has been used as an analogy for her writing gifts. But I think it is also an appropriate analogy for her writing weaknesses: she is flying so high above her subject that she is slightly out of earshot and slightly out of view of the real city. Another problem I have is the author's uneven tone--is it satire, is it irony? I don't know. Out of the entire cast, I felt empathy for only one character and frankly none for the city at all. I guess all the tragedy I've personally witnessed and continue to witness since Katrina makes me sensitive about a writer approaching New Orleans without a truly vested emotional commitment to it. I don't know. I just didn't feel it here. Still, this is a book that can be finished in a day or two; it is interesting and there are patches of beautiful writing throughout, so for a light read I would recommend it. But only for a light read.
Zargelynd
After reading the summary of the novel I thought it sounded really good. It was quite well written but I was disappointed with the way the story unrolled...