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by Charles Wright

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Author: Charles Wright
ISBN: 0374533172
Language: English
Pages: 384 pages
Category: Poetry
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (March 27, 2012)
Rating: 4.6
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FB2 size: 1430 kb | EPUB size: 1764 kb | DJVU size: 1535 kb
Sub: Fiction

Charles Wright is the United States Poet Laureate.

Only 16 left in stock (more on the way). Charles Wright is the United States Poet Laureate. His poetry collections include Country Music, Black Zodiac, Chickamauga, Bye-and-Bye: Selected Later Poems, Sestets, and Caribou. He is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the National Book Award, the Griffin Poetry Prize, and the 2013 Bollingen Prize for American Poetry.

Bye-and-Bye: Selected Late Poems. Bye-and-Bye is a wonderful introduction to the late work of one of America's finest and best-loved poets. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Start by marking Bye-and-Bye: Selected Late Poems as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

that transcends change and death; winner: 2013 Bollingen Prize for American Poetry! Read it. Bye-and-Bye Charles Wright Macmillan.

Bye-and-Bye is a wonderful introduction to the late work of one of America's finest and best-loved poets" .

Bye-and-Bye is a wonderful introduction to the late work of one of America's finest and best-loved poets"-Provided by publisher. Over the course of nineteen collections of poems, Charles Wright has built "one of the truly distinctive bodies of poetry created in the second half of the twentieth century" (David Young, Contemporary Poets).

Charles Wright (born August 25, 1935) is an American poet. From 2014 to 2015, he served as the 50th Poet Laureate of the United States. Wright was born in Pickwick Dam, Tennessee

Wright himself has said that he used Pound’s Italian Cantos as a guide book during . Bye-and-Bye: Selected Late Poems, Farrar, Straus, and Giroux (New York, NY), 2011.

Wright himself has said that he used Pound’s Italian Cantos as a guide book during his time in Italy-first as a means to discover out-of-the-way places, then as a reference, and finally as a copy book. Pound’s influence is also readily evident in The Grave of the Right Hand, Wright’s first major collection. Charles Wright is a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets and the Souder Family Professor of English at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Caribou, Farrar, Straus, and Giroux (New York, NY), 2014.

ISBN13: 9780374533175.

The first two of those trilogies were collected in Country Music (1982) and The World of the Ten Thousand Things (1990).

Over the course of nineteen collections of poems, Charles Wright has built "one of the truly distinctive bodies of poetry created in the second half of the twentieth century" (David Young, Contemporary Poets). Bye-and-Bye, which brings together selections from Wright's more recent work―including the entirety of Littlefoot, Wright's moving, book-length meditation on mortality―showcases the themes and images that have defined his mature work: the true affinity between writer and subject, human and nature; the tenuous relationship between description and actuality; and the search for a truth that transcends change and death. Bye-and-Bye is a wonderful introduction to the late work of one of America's finest and best-loved poets.

Comments (7)
Morlurne
I'm an ol' lit major, retired from teaching, but far from an expert on poetry. I just know when it speaks to me, and this volume does. The poetry of Charles Wright is unpretentious, truthful, and beguiling. I'm saving it for my morning Rooibos teatime, a treat for my mind, reading a few pages (or a few dozen) to begin my day, and his occasional references to other, older poets have inspired me to check out others' works (like Georg Trakl) that I plan to delve into later. I'd read several of Wright's poems on Poemhunter.com and decided I needed this poet in my life. No need to underline favorite passages, there are so many.
Mora
Charles Wright is most likely the finest poet the American South has ever produced. No one in American poetry can match his raw gift for language, and he has spent a lifetime dealing in poetry with the hard problem of meaning in our lives. I can't think of a better appointment for Poet Laureate of America. This is simply world-class work.
Thomeena
I have to demur from the reader reviews already posted here, though I'm reluctant to. I've been a Wright fan since China Trace, but over the years, like a lot of poets who've succeeded in their careers, Wright has simply run out of things to say. This book collects the best poems of his previous five books--which were, to me, all the same. Wright writes these days about what he sees out of his back window. He writes about meadows, birds, leaves, trees, clouds, etc., then throws in quotes from various mystics and bits from Italian painters and writers. Like Merwin, he's a skilled wordsmith and every poem here is carefully wrought, and I must admit fun to read. But you can read the five poems that open this book and the last five and see that Wright is just running in place. I know I'll get a lot of flack from this, but Wright has always been one of my favorites. But I think he ran out of new things to write about 20 years ago. There are no surprises here as there are, say, in Ashbery's recent poems or the poems Philip Levine wrote up to his death.
Rageseeker
I was not familiar with the work of Charles Wright, but read a very short poem of his in an on-line publication. It was so intriguing that I ordered "Bye-and-Bye."
The collection is awesome. The way Mr. Wright is able to cast everyday thoughts and experiences in a new light opens (to me) new ways of seeing our world and examining our thoughts and feelings. Even the way the words are arrayed on the page is stimulating. I am reading some of this poetry every day. Now I know that I must go back and highlight many of the thoughts he expresses in ways that bring new light to the ideas.
Voodoogore
Mesmerizing take on nature, connection, grace, and hope. Makes me alert, meditative, thankful.
Tojahn
A master at work.
Akinohn
beautiful images and a spiritual miracle
I am embarrased at the memory of being a grad student invited to join Charles Wright for dinner with my prof and a few other grad students before a reading: I was unexperienced in much of life, wishing to impress, but not with equipment to have any real conversation. I'm now an Episcopal priest, seen a bit of life...maybe the same age now that Wright was then, at that dinner table. How I wish I could repeat the opportunity. Wright was then and is now a master of tone, substance, art. I've followed his ruminations about matters spiritual/religious/metaphysical. I still don't share his interest in Asian poets and poetic matters, and probably never will, but have brought his poems with me on several trips to Italy. Wright has entered a third stage in his writing--I'm not stating anything earth shattering here, as anyone who is familiar with his 'trinitarian' publishing history knows. My time as a grad student came at the conclusion of his vatic, short poetry. His period of long forms--long lines, long journal poems--was a satisfying turn. Now he is more, hmmm, 'quotidian' isn't the right word....grounded in the personal and natural though (where so many poets start off, w/all the attendant shallowness that Wright transcends). If I were ever to get ambitious, I think I'd like to take one of his predominating images/concepts...say 'stillness' or images celestial, perhaps the color white ("White ants, white ants, and the little ribs" was almost a religious chant we grad students took up) and follow it through the first two Selected collections: Country Music and World of Ten Thousand Things, into this third selected poems.