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by Gerald Green

Download Last Angry Man fb2
Author: Gerald Green
ISBN: 0891901213
Language: English
Publisher: Amereon Ltd (March 1, 1983)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: mbr lrf rtf lrf
FB2 size: 1104 kb | EPUB size: 1698 kb | DJVU size: 1146 kb
Sub: Fiction

The book is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Green's father (a physician who died four years before the book was .

The book is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Green's father (a physician who died four years before the book was published) and I can imagine how inspiring his father must have been. 3 people found this helpful. Like da Vinci pencil-sketching a future masterpiece, Gerald Green used "The Last Angry Man" as a sort of scratch pad for "To Brooklyn with Love," a small but wonderful novel he would write a decade later.

Based on the author’s own father, this is a raw, compelling portrait of the neighborhood, life, and character of an angry hero.

His work is hard, his life harder. A TV producer finds him and, as he interviews the old man for his reality TV show, comes to learn that anger is not a flaw but a deeply moral response to the corruption and fraud of his city. Based on the author’s own father, this is a raw, compelling portrait of the neighborhood, life, and character of an angry hero.

2 Books written by Gerald Green. Green wrote many novels, the best known being The Last Angry Man, published in 1956. It was adapted into a movie by the same name which was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Paul Muni) and Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White. His other novels include His Majesty O'Keefe (co-authored with Lawrence Klingman), adapted into a 1954 film, North West, Portofino PTA, To Brooklyn With Love, My Son the Jock, The Lotus Eaters and East and West.

The Last Angry Man is a 1959 drama film which tells the story of a television producer who profiles the life of a physician. The movie was scripted by Richard Murphy from the novel by Gerald Green (who also adapted it), and was directed by Daniel Mann.

He was the last angry ma. This might be a spoiler quotation if you're willing to read the book.

The last angry man No one's perfect. The doctor could have not been better had he been different, and neither did Max Vogel or any one else. This book depicts character, and nature of people truthfully.

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The last angry man. Just awesome!

The last angry man. Just awesome! PagesPublic figureAuthorGerald GreenPosts. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. Gerald Green updated their cover photo. (1956) A novel by Gerald Green. Sam Abelman, an elderly doctor who has outlined his time, practices compassionate medicine in the slums of Brooklyn and struggles as he rails against the corruption of his city in a powerful and poignant novel based on the life of Green's uncle. Paul Mun Genre: General Fiction.

Sam Abelman, an elderly doctor who has outlined his time, practices compassionate medicine in the slums of Brooklyn and struggles as he rails against the corruption of his city in a powerful and poignant novel based on the life of Green's uncle. Paul Muni memorably played the lead in the movie, his last role.
Comments (7)
thrust
The only reason this was rated a 4 is because the condition was not as good as I thought it should be. Nonetheless, this period piece about the ethics of an elderly doctor contrasted with the ad agency opportunist is still worth the read. I got it for my doctor who was retiring. I had seen the movie as a child and couldn't remember much of it. But I was left with a strong impression of the doctor, who reminded me of my own. The book lived up to my hopes.
nailer
Reread this book 50 years later and still liked it. Of course I can relate as a Jewish MD. On the other hand this depicts someone without much grace but with a lot of heart, a physician of the old school who uses his brain to make a diagnosis, who shuns the 8 to 5 multiple testing doctors of today. A great story.
Tejar
Quite simply, one of the best books I've ever read. Period. I originally read it in 1974. This time it reads even better. Some things improve with age.
Falya
It was a well written book. I had seen the movie decades ago but had not read the novel. The book was received in the condition stated by the seller. I am satisfied.
Ygglune
Although "To Brooklyn With Love" and "Holocaust" were very powerful, Green outdid himself with this superb and very compelling book. I read it more than 40 years ago and yet I haven't forgotten what an impact the book had on me. In fact, I wrote a letter to Mr. Green (in care of the publisher) and he sent me a reply (which I've saved, of course). The book is dedicated to the memory of Mr. Green's father (a physician who died four years before the book was published) and I can imagine how inspiring his father must have been.
Sharpbinder
Like da Vinci pencil-sketching a future masterpiece, Gerald Green used "The Last Angry Man" as a sort of scratch pad for "To Brooklyn with Love," a small but wonderful novel he would write a decade later. This earlier work is a character study-and a fine one-rich with textured detail and the colorful language of first-generation Americans and the other survivors of hardscrabble life in the postwar ghetto. Dr. Sam Abelman, who will reappear in the later book with little changed but his name, is angry. He rants about disease, poverty, intolerance and the absence of ambition; he resents the specialists who steal his two-dollar patients, and the patients who are too cheap to pay. He is a frontier physician with a heart of gold, a lovable curmudgeon who might be an angel with a better attitude and fewer Yiddish curses.
The plot isn't uniformly gripping. There is a particularly arid stretch in the third quarter. But this portrait of the gritty Brownsville section of Brooklyn and its inhabitants is infectious and real, and Green's generous prose takes us to a faraway time and place and culture as effectively as any time machine ever might. The trip is worth it.
Manris
I read this as a young man after my grandmother gave me a copy. I was hooked on this story of decline -- and growth -- during the middle of the 20th Century. It sparked in me a lifelong series of thoughts about whether to be sad that the world changes (as the doctor in story often is) or whether to accept that nothing is as we remember it. This isn't necessarily beautiful American fiction, but it is important nonetheless.
Green's work is especially relevant in today's culture where our leadership doesn't seem to have any moral or social backbone. The Last Angry Man portrays a truely noble doctor's attempt to reclaim such morality, by oddly caring about the consequences of his actions and the reality of his situation. Being the older and poorer practictioner, loosing patients to yuppie specialists and a neighborhood that is falling apart. Life's difficulties are explored and his undying anger prooves there are still some of us that care.