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by Kenneth E. Marshall

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Author: Kenneth E. Marshall
ISBN: 1580463932
Language: English
Pages: 222 pages
Category: History & Criticism
Publisher: University of Rochester Press (November 15, 2011)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: mbr lrf lrf mbr
FB2 size: 1787 kb | EPUB size: 1494 kb | DJVU size: 1867 kb
Sub: Fiction

Manhood Enslaved’ reconstructs the lives of three male captives to bring greater intellectual and historical clarity to the muted lives of enslaved peoples in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century central New Jersey, where blacks were held in bondage for nearly two centuries.

Manhood Enslaved’ reconstructs the lives of three male captives to bring greater intellectual and historical clarity to the muted lives of enslaved peoples in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century central New Jersey, where blacks were held in bondage for nearly two centuries. The book contributes to an evolving body of historical scholarship arguing that the lives of bondpeople in America were shaped not only by the powerful forces of racial oppression, but also by their own notions of gender.

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Gender and race in American history, 2152-6400 ; v. . On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. 2. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

By Kenneth E. Marshall. Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2011 As Marshall notes, the study of early American slavery is made difficult by. Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2011. In his brief, yet rich, volume Kenneth Marshall takes the reader into the often forgotten and understudied world of revolutionary era northern slavery and of Somerset County, New Jersey in particular. As Marshall notes, the study of early American slavery is made difficult by the paucity of sources. Marshall focuses on the lives of three enslaved men: Yombo and Dick Melick, from Mellick's narrative, and Quamino Buccau from Allinson's biography.

oceedings{, title {Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early . Publications citing this paper. The Great Jugular Vein of Slavery: New Histories of the Domestic Slave Trade.

oceedings{, title {Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century New Jersey. By Kenneth E. University of Rochester Press.

Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century New Jersey. Manhood Enslaved reconstructs the lives of three male captives to bring greater intellectual and historical clarity to the muted lives of enslaved peoples in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century central New Jersey, where blacks were held in bondage for nearly two centuries. The book contributes to an evolving body of historical scholarship arguing that the lives of bond people in America were shaped not only by the powerful forces of racial oppression, but also by their own notions of gender.

December 1982 · Journal of American Studies.

Request PDF On Dec 1, 2012, Jane Manners and others published Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century New Jersey. Peter Goddard has left Cambridge University to become the eighth director of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, US. Former faculty members at the institute include Albert Einstein, Kurt Gödel, Robert Oppenheimer, John von Neumann and Hermann Weyl. December 1982 · Journal of American Studies.

Manhood Enslaved reconstructs the lives of three male captives to bring greater intellectual and historical clarity to the muted lives of enslaved peoples in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century central New Jersey, where blacks were held in bondage for nearly two centuries. The book contributes to an evolving body of historical scholarship arguing that the lives of bondpeople in Americawere shaped not only by the powerful forces of racial oppression, but also by their own notions of gender

Manhood Enslaved reconstructs the lives of three male captives to bring greater intellectual and historical clarity to the muted lives of enslaved peoples in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century central New Jersey, where blacks were held in bondage for nearly two centuries.

author Kenneth Marshall, whose book Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in.

Saturday, Nov. 1, at the new Barnes & Noble Bookstore at College Town on Mt. Hope Avenue. The presentation also will include remarks by local author Kenneth Marshall, whose book Manhood Enslaved: Bondmen in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century New Jersey appeared in the Gender and Race series.

Manhood Enslaved reconstructs the lives of three male captives to bring greater intellectual and historical clarity to the muted lives of enslaved peoples in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century central New Jersey, where blacks were held in bondage for nearly two centuries. The book contributes to an evolving body of historical scholarship arguing that the lives of bondpeople in America were shaped not only by the powerful forces of racial oppression, but also by their own notions of gender. The book uses previously understudied, white-authored, nineteenth-century literature about central New Jersey slaves as a point of departure. Reading beyond the racist assumptions of the authors, it contends that the precarious day-to-day existence of the three protagonists -- Yombo Melick, Dick Melick, and Quamino Buccau (Smock) -- provides revealing evidence about the various elements of "slave manhood" that gave real meaning to their oppressed lives. Kenneth E. Marshall is Assistant Professor of History at the State University of New York at Oswego.