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by Roberto Bolano,Chris Andrews

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Author: Roberto Bolano,Chris Andrews
ISBN: 1843430355
Language: English
Pages: 144 pages
Category: History & Criticism
Publisher: The Harvill Press; Edition Not Stated edition (February 6, 2003)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: azw lit docx mbr
FB2 size: 1314 kb | EPUB size: 1370 kb | DJVU size: 1607 kb
Sub: Fiction

The culture of writers and intellectuals in Chile, and in the Hispanic world at large, is peculiar and unfamiliar, and "we" will have difficulty recognizing what's at stake for the young Urrutia, who aspires to be both a poet and a literary critic of lasting influence.

Translated by CHRIS ANDREWS. A new directions book. for Carolina López and Lautaro Bolaño. Take off your wig. CHESTERTON. I AM DYING NOW, but I still have many things to say. I used to be at peace with myself. But it all blew up unexpectedly.

By night in Chile, by Roberto Bolaño ; translated by Chris Andrews. p. cm. eISBN 978-0-8112-2051-4. Roberto Bolaño, By Night in Chile. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom. 1. Chile - History - 1973–1988 - Fiction.

By Night in Chile book. Roberto Bolaño, Chris Andrews (Translator). By Night in Chile is a novella, my second book by Roberto Bolaño after my reading last year of the 900 plus page 2666. It is tempting to say the former (an earlier) book is just a shorter version of One has a moral obligation to take responsibility for one’s actions, and that includes one’s words and silences, yes, one’s silences, because silences rise to heaven too, and God hears them, and only God understands and judges them, so one must be very careful.

Roberto Bolaño was born in 1953 in Santiago, Chile, and later lived in Mexico, Paris, and Spain: he wrote nine novels, two story collections, and five books of poetry, before dying in July 2003 at the age of 50. Seven more of his books are forthcoming from New Directions.

By Night in Chile (Spanish title: Nocturno de Chile) is a novella written by Chilean author Roberto Bolaño, and first published in 2000. It was the first of Bolaño's novels to be published in English, with Chris Andrews's English translation, which appeared in 2003 under New Directions. The story is narrated entirely in the first person by the sick and aging Father Urrutia.

This book represents Bolaño's views upon returning to Chile and finding a haven .

This book represents Bolaño's views upon returning to Chile and finding a haven for the consolidation of power structures and human right violation. Among the many acid pleasures of the work of Roberto Bolaño, who died at 50 in 2003, is his idea that culture, in particular literary culture, is a whore. By Night in Chile came out in 2003 and received an endorsement by Susan Sontag; at the same time Bolaño's work also began appearing in various magazines, which gained him broader recognition among English readers

Bolaño published this well-received satirical novella in 2000. The story is told completely through the eyes of the decrepit priest Father Urrutia over the course of one night

Bolaño published this well-received satirical novella in 2000. The story is told completely through the eyes of the decrepit priest Father Urrutia over the course of one night. The novella is a confession of sorts for the priest, who admits to having worked for Pinochet and his generals, teaching them about Marxism. Over the course of the Father’s monologue, the reader also learns of Urrutia’s success as a literary critic and of his encounters with falconry, when he decides to release a caged falcon.

By Night in Chile is not that type of novel. It cannot be, because Bolaño is a different kind of novelist and because he is no longer resident in Chile

By Night in Chile is not that type of novel. It cannot be, because Bolaño is a different kind of novelist and because he is no longer resident in Chile. Nevertheless, this is a wonderful and beautifully written book by a writer who has an enviable control over every beat, every change of tempo, every image. The prose is constantly exciting and challenging - at times lyrical and allusive, at others filled with a biting wit (Bolaño has dissected the Chilean literary tradition with such gleeful eloquence that the novel may not win him many dinner invitations back in the country of his birth).

Comments (7)
Mbon
It helps that I am married to a Chilean, because you really need to know a little of the historical background of Chile. It can be very confusing skipping back and forth and I found I needed to read a really silly book afterwards because my brain felt squeezed by trying to keep up with the plot. It is full of Deep Thoughts so be in that kind of mood if you are going to pick it up.
Marige
Bolano's third best book, behind Savage Dectectives and 2666.
JoJosho
4.5 stars. Lacks the powers that course through Savage Detectives and 2666, but not without its own one-liner displays. Perhaps best as an intro to Bolaño given its size and small (compared to Savage Detectives and 2666) thematic focus.
Celak
... to judgement! Don't think you know where this novella is going until you get there! It's not very long - only 130 pages - so you might try to read it all in one sitting, letting it take over, coming to believe the voice of the narrator, the celibate homosexual priest/poet/critic who announces in his first words that he is "dying now." It's the credibility of that voice that elevates this rambling, stumbling 'confession' to enormous emotional power. (If you're a potential book buyer who NEEDS a summary of the action first, take a look at the very ample review here in the amazone by "Rhoda".)

Father Urrutia, the priest narrator, has his own timetable for exposing himself. He's all the way to page 56 - or should we admit that there's an 'author' controlling his pace? - before he cautiously reveals his affiliation with Opus Dei and his entanglement with the portions of Chilean society that reveled in the CIA-assisted assault on democracy which placed Pinochet on his throne of torture. If you have no formed opinion of Opus Dei, if you've never even heard of the conspiratorial right-wing cadre, you might as well skip this review and this book. Nothing in it will matter to you. But the assignment that Opus Dei gives Father Urrutia, to investigate the methods that the clergy of Europe are using to prevent the dilapidation of church buildings, results in a breath-taking feat of surrealism by author Roberto Bolaño, in which the membrane between the priest's dreams and awakenings is dissolved.

The first 55 pages, I admit, will be hard going for English readers. The culture of writers and intellectuals in Chile, and in the Hispanic world at large, is peculiar and unfamiliar, and "we" will have difficulty recognizing what's at stake for the young Urrutia, who aspires to be both a poet and a literary critic of lasting influence. But forge on! The betrayal of those aspirations -the collapse of belief in literature - is thematic, and the reader needs to know who Urrutia thought he was in order to experience the horror of Urrutia's realization of who he has become.

There's a word in Spanish - 'tertulio' - meaning an extended social occasion at which the guests discuss literature, read their works, hold forth in competitive intellectuality. The word is translated here as 'soirée' but such an event is closer to the brazenly immodest conversation one hears in an Ivy League dining hall. The culminating scene remembered by the dying priest was at a tertulio, attended by cautious intellectuals despite the curfew against such events during the Pinochet horror-era. The hostess, a Chilean, aspires to be a Writer and needs the 'nourishment' of intellectual company; her husband is an American hit-man, a torturer who conducts interrogations in the basement of their mansion. It's his secret identity that ensures that the wife's tertulio will not be raided by Pinochet's thugs. Is it possible that the guests are totally unaware? Is their ignorance a survival tactic, a hypocrisy, an indifference? Bolaño seems to be suggesting that even to survive during the Pinochet era required one to become sordid and complicit.

The crimes of Pinochet and his henchmen, Chilean and American, weigh as heavily on the writers of Chile as the burden of Hitlerism on German post-war thinkers. Any other theme would seem trivial.

Bolaño is not an easy stylist. His run-on parenthetical stream-of-attention structure is similar to that of Vladimir Nabokov or Thomas Bernhard, though less humorous than the former and graciously less depressive than the latter. This is not a book for escapist readers. It's a psychological tragedy, but one that will, ironically, reinforce the value of literature for coping with the shame of humanity.
Manarius
Really good book. Had to read it for a class but I was a big fan
Wel
Brilliant subversive writer. USA CIA connection plus the double sublimation of art and religion under a dictator.
Thomeena
Written in a distinct style of essentially one paragraph, this riveting stream of consciousness is by a priest on his deathbed. It is an intriguing look into the connection between literature and politics during the time of Pinochet.
I have tried to get into this book 3 times now, and each time, I find it tedious. I have read up to 1/3 of the book, and cannot get past that point. The style of the author, a narrative in a rambling first person style, just drags on and on. I am sure that in the original language, were I able to read and appreciate Spanish, would be more poetic in nature, more imbued with depth of nuances. Since this is the memoirs of a very old man, who has a long tale to relate, I keep thinking that he should be getting to the point before he dies .I do not mean to belittle the work, as it must resonate with many readers to be given such good reviews, just not with me.