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by Cammie McGovern

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Author: Cammie McGovern
ISBN: 0670037656
Language: English
Pages: 304 pages
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Viking Adult; First Printing edition (June 1, 2006)
Rating: 4.7
Formats: txt lit rtf docx
FB2 size: 1292 kb | EPUB size: 1863 kb | DJVU size: 1420 kb
Sub: Fiction

Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. First published in 2006 by Viking Penguin, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc.

Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. PUBLISHER’S NOTE: This is a work of fiction.

Cammie McGovern was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford and received the Nelson Algren Award in short fiction. Her work has been published in Redbook, Seventeen, Glimmer Train, TriQuarterly, and other publications. Books by Cammie McGovern. Mor. rivia About Eye Contact.

Two children disappear into the woods behind Woodside Elementary School. Hours later one them, nine-year-old Adam, in found alive, the sole witness to his playmate’s murder. Author Cammie McGovern has created a page-turner that will keep you up at night trying to solve a murder, worried about, half in love with the children involve. ou’ll close Eye Contact knowing more about loving children involve. ou’ll close Eye Contact knowing more about loving children as they are, rather than as we expect them to be. The State.

Eye contact Eye Contact was a very good book. It was very thrilling at the start but more towards the end it started to become a little slow. It was a book you need to read twice to understand the ending. However, she eventually put the memoir aside to return to fiction because she says, "I knew how to create a story and keep it moving along with suspense and surprises better than I knew how to report the countless ways that those years were hard and lonely for our family.

Kudos for Cammie McGovern for writing a book that includes an autistic child. Overall I feel like I really like Cammie McGovern, but her books have all fallen a bit flat. Adams character is really well written and very interesting to read  . Overall I feel like I really like Cammie McGovern, but her books have all fallen a bit flat Читать весь отзыв.

In Eye Contact, two children vanish in the woods behind their elementary school

In Eye Contact, two children vanish in the woods behind their elementary school. Hours later, nine-year-old Adam is found alive, the sole witness to his playmate’s murder. But because Adam has autism, he is a silent witness. Only his mother, Cara, can help decode his behavior for the police. Like The Lovely Bones and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Cammie McGovern’s breakout novel is at once a hypnotic thriller and an affecting portrait of people as real as our next-door neighbors. In Eye Contact, two children vanish in the woods behind their elementary school.

A conversation with cammie mcgovern. Book Clubs - Penguin Group (USA).

Read Cammie McGovern's posts on the Penguin BlogLike The Lovely Bones and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Cammie McGovern's breakout novel is at once a hypnotic thriller and an affecting portrait of people as real as our next-door neighbors. Hours later, nine-year-old Adam is found alive, the sole witness to his playmate's murder.

Martin says, sitting at a tiny bar table across from June. in, a school guidance counselor she has never particularly liked, though the kids all do, especially the boys who horseshoe around him in the hallway to talk about sports scores

For nine years, Adam has been the centre of his mother, Cara's world

For nine years, Adam has been the centre of his mother, Cara's world. And, she thinks, she has been the centre of his, until the day he disappears. Progressing from the first flirtatious moment of eye contact to the selection of a mate, this enlightening book offers playful philosophical explorations of the dating game for anyone who has date. John Wiley&Sons Limited (USD), (формат: 155x235, 368 ст. электронная книга.

In the aftermath of a child's shocking murder, the mother of the only witness, an autistic boy, struggles to work through her son's trauma and his communication disabilities in order to help the police to solve the case. 40,000 first printing.
Comments (7)
I_LOVE_228
I really enjoyed this story, Iwas not sure I would but the Charaters were developed and had depth. I enjoyed that the author seemed to have insight into autism that extended beyond just some investigation and into real experience. The story held my attention to the point that I hated to put the book down. Some of the Nostalgic of days gone by bothered me at first, but once I thought about it I realized that people do look to the past with a tinted view. All in all a great read that is enjoyable and often heart-warming.
Manris
This was chosen as the next book for our book club. I agree with the one review that says it was a good look into autism, but failed as a thriller. I really struggled to get through this book for the following reasons:
- The book's plot has a heavy emphasis on autism, but the overly doting mother, the things she gets amazed about that he does...it's just too much too often. Autism is a very real thing and a very difficult prognosis for child and parent, but the story focused way too much on this and became redundant. I began to wonder - does this single mom work? What else does she do all day? She just swoops in and saves the day always like she's always just there.
- Because of the above, it seemed like none of the characters were ever fully developed whatsoever. It was as if the crime plot was an afterthought in the book. Characters were coming out of no where, I had trouble accounting for who was who and why they were even part of the story and why they even mattered. Then as the catalyst of the book was happening it was as if the author was trying to be clever but it seemed very disjointed and not well thought out. It left me with alot of...REALLY?? and Wait a minute, what??
- The end. I won't spoil it for anyone, but the end made absolutely no sense to me on why it was written the way it was.

It all boils down to this book should have been more focused and it could have been ok. The writing wasn't particularly strong and the plot was neither twisty or interesting (for me anyway). If you have an affinity for reading about autism it does a good job of letting you in to the struggles and triumphs so you may enjoy that part. If you're reading it is a thriller, I'd definitely pass.
Ieslyaenn
Many Amazon reviewers have discussed the portrayals of multiple characters with autistic spectrum or other physical or developmental challenges in this novel. I heartily agree that those portrayals are refreshingly authentic. Now, does this small town have too many struggling residents to stretch reader credulity? That's a tough call. The author gives us an opportunity to see autism, agoraphobia and physical handicaps from many different angles. And it's widely accepted now that autism, at least, has exploded in almost unbelievable numbers in recent years. So either the use of multiple disabled characters goes beyond our willingness to suspend disbelief, or it's the author developing a theme.

I've read a lot of novels about the pain of discovering one's child suffers from this disability. I'm glad to see these books bringing the subject to light, and dramatizing how very different the children are. They can be loving and lovable, and the mightier-than-the-sword word processor is finally erasing the stereotype of the head-banging, don't-touch-me, non-verbal, hopeless case bound for a lifetime in an institution. Mark Haddon's fantastic book, *Curious Incident,* was a marvelous contribution, but he can't be the final word, because Christopher Boone (Haddon's autistic hero) is only one person, and as other reviewers have pointed out, these "sufferers" are as different as diabetics or asthmatics.

I believe that the problem McGovern tries to tackle is to find an original take on this newly popular genre by framing it as a mystery, a little like Haddon did (or as his marketing department did), instead of as yet another domestic drama. But *Eye Contact* is at the far end of the mystery spectrum, with its paucity of police procedure, unlikely villain(s), and flashback-laden pages. Still, when a reader sees the word "mystery," either on the cover or just the flap jacket, he or she can be reassured that the author will keep the pages turning, and even in the best mystery, we want to care about the characters even more than we want to be surprised.

Get That Novel Written
Akinonris
Eye Contact is a book which will keep you glued to the pages until the end. It fills so many well-known literary niches: combining amateur sleuthing, a detective story, parenting, mental illness, small-town romance.

As the book begins we learn what will be the central mystery, a young girl, an elementary student, has been killed and the only witness is a nine-year old boy with severe autism, who therefore cannot fully explain what he knows. The book introduces us to several unreliable witnesses, all of whom have reasons for not revealing a full truth, or not knowing the full truth. As we follow the story we see how much even the most devoted observer can miss the salient facts, even when autism is not a factor in the mystery. What I loved most in "Eye Contact" was the author's fondness and knowledge of kids at the edges of the spectrum (those kids who can "pass" for normal) who are persecuted for being "weird", and her insight into their strengths and weaknesses. I also loved her compassion for men and women who may not be living the American Dream but are still trying valiantly to make a go of their lives, to live out their own story arc. Most of all I enjoyed McGovern's feel for character and plot, and her ability to keep me reading, fascinated, until the end of the book.