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by Marianne Wiggins

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Author: Marianne Wiggins
ISBN: 0743265211
Language: English
Pages: 336 pages
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (June 3, 2008)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: lrf rtf rtf mobi
FB2 size: 1787 kb | EPUB size: 1357 kb | DJVU size: 1626 kb
Sub: Fiction

The shadow catcher: a novel, Marianne Wiggins. 1st Simon & Schuster.

The shadow catcher: a novel, Marianne Wiggins. Let me tell you about the sketch by Leonardo I saw one afternoon in the Queen’s Gallery in London a decade ago, and why I think it haunts me. The Queen’s Gallery is on the west front side of Buckingham Palace, on a street that’s always noisy, full of taxis rushing round the incongruous impediment of a massive residence in the middle of a route to Parliament and Westminster Abbey and, more importantly, a train station named Victoria.

The Shadow Catcher is Marianne Wiggins's eighth novel. The Shadow Catcher" is a highly enjoyable novel. Over a career that has spanned more than 30 years and included a Pulitzer Prize nomination for Evidence of Things Unseen (2003), the author has built a reputation as a stylist and a storyteller with an eye for distinctive, character-driven material. The frame story uses a device that seems to be coming up in a lot of very recent books: the main character, who tells the story, has the same name as the author, and seems to have many similar characteristics.

The Shadow Catcher dramatically inhabits the space where past and present intersect, seamlessly interweaving .

The Shadow Catcher dramatically inhabits the space where past and present intersect, seamlessly interweaving narratives from two different eras: the first fraught passion between h-century icon Edward Curtis (1868-1952) and his muse-wife, Clara; and a journey of redemption. Narrated in the first person by a reimagined writer named Marianne Wiggins, the novel begins in Hollywood, where top producers are eager to sentimentalize the complicated life of Edward Curtis as a sunny biopic: "It's got the outdoors.

From her briefcase Stacey extracts a phonebook-thick paperback feathered with yellow Post-it notes. 147. 0. Published: 2007. what can I say? she says. Well of course it is, she smiles. Which is why I knew we had to have first look. She pats my manuscript and I realize, with relief, she hasn’t read it. Jon must have brought it with him to the table.

The Shadow Catcher book. This is an amazing novel. Wiggins the character wants to tell (or at least know) an honest story, one that is in rather direct conflict with the "official" story. Really, though, she writes about identity and about "lighting out" (sometimes for, sometimes from). The novel interweaves the stories of Curtis & his wife, Clara, Wiggins' own parents, and This is an amazing novel.

Marianne Wiggins offers resonant revelations on the American landscape while examining the large life of legendary . The After Party: A Novel - Anton DiSclafani

Buffalo and Erie County Public Library Catalog. The After Party: A Novel - Anton DiSclafani. From the nationally bestselling author of The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls comes a story of Texas socialites and the one irresistible, controversial woman at the bright, hot center of it all. The After Party: A Novel by Anton DiSclafani "Joan Fortier is the Serena van der Woodsen of Texas. And her best friend is a little too obsessed with her (à la Georgina Sparks).

Marianne Wiggins's new novel, The Shadow Catcher, centers in. .

Marianne Wiggins's new novel, The Shadow Catcher, centers in part on the life of a real historical figure, Edward Sheriff Curtis. Discuss the unique process of weaving fact and fiction: What difficulties it might pose? What artistic freedoms might emerge? The book features an unusual narrative technique, combining historical fiction with more documentary-style biography and history, as well as a personal narrative that reads like memoir. In another unusual feature for a novel, The Shadow Catcher is peppered with images - not only some of Edward Curtis's photographs, but photographs from Marianne Wiggins's family and images of historical and personal documents as well.

The Shadow Catcher: A Novel. The Shadow Catcher - Marianne Wiggins. All writers have these moments-all people do-when Realization forms from air. Following her National Book Award finalist, Evidence of Things Unseen, Marianne Wiggins turns her extraordinary literary imagination to the American West, where the life of legendary photographer Edward S. Curtis is the basis for a resonant exploration of history and family, landscape and legacy.

Marianne Wiggins (born September 8, 1947) is an American author. The characters and storylines in her novels have been described as unusual. According to The Cambridge Guide to Women's Writing in English, Wiggins writes with "a bold intelligence and an ear for hidden comedy. She has won a Whiting Award, an National Endowment for the Arts award and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in fiction in 2004 for her novel Evidence of Things Unseen.

Following her National Book Award finalist, Evidence of Things Unseen, Marianne Wiggins turns her extraordinary literary imagination to the American West, where the life of legendary photographer Edward S. Curtis is the basis for a resonant exploration of history and family, landscape and legacy. The Shadow Catcher dramatically inhabits the space where past and present intersect, seamlessly interweaving narratives from two different eras: the first fraught passion between turn-of-the-twentieth-century icon Edward Curtis (1868-1952) and his muse-wife, Clara; and a twenty-first-century journey of redemption. Narrated in the first person by a reimagined writer named Marianne Wiggins, the novel begins in Hollywood, where top producers are eager to sentimentalize the complicated life of Edward Curtis as a sunny biopic: "It's got the outdoors. It's got adventure. It's got the do-good element." Yet, contrary to Curtis's esteemed public reputation as servant to his nation, the artist was an absent husband and disappearing father. Jump to the next generation, when Marianne's own father, John Wiggins (1920-1970), would live and die in equal thrall to the impulse of wanderlust. Were the two men running from or running to? Dodging the false beacons of memory and legend, Marianne amasses disparate clues -- photographs and hospital records, newspaper clippings and a rare white turquoise bracelet -- to recover those moments that went unrecorded, "to hear the words only the silent ones can speak." The Shadow Catcher, fueled by the great American passions for love and land and family, chases the silhouettes of our collective history into the bright light of the present.
Comments (7)
Dikus
"The Shadow Catcher" is a highly enjoyable novel. The frame story uses a device that seems to be coming up in a lot of very recent books: the main character, who tells the story, has the same name as the author, and seems to have many similar characteristics. "Marianne Wiggins" -- the character who might be the author -- begins with some observations about artwork: "Let me tell you about the sketch by Leonardo I saw one afernoon in the Queen's Gallery in London a decade ago, and why I think it haunts me." (p. 1)

The first two chapters could possibly be autobiograpical: the narrator is a writer, trying to sell a script to an unnamed Hollywood personality. She lives in LA and obsesses about traffic and alterate ways to avoid the worst congestion. She knows about celebrities. She has a home and a car. Her book is about Edward Curtis, photographer, who created the common understanding of what it looked like to be an Indian. All the details of her life could be either truth or fiction: it's not a critical matter.

On page 43, the novel turns to "her" book. It starts with the early life of Edward Curtis's wife Clara, daughter of a painter whose works are no longer desired because photography has replaced his skills. We see how she and her younger brother happened to travel out to the territory of Washington to live with his family. As Clara meets Edward Curtis, we meet him. As he develops into a skilled and artful photographer, we see him through her eyes, and we find out how she teaches him what she's learned about painting: the link to the first thoughts of "Marianne Wiggins" and her passion for Renaissance Italian art.

A marvelous aspect of The Shadow Catcher is the constant reference to the works of Curtis, which are reproduced so much that every reader can probably visualize them. In case you don't have the photos in your mind's eye, very small reproductions of the works and of other relevant material appear in the text: I think the use of illustrations in a novel is another 21st century trick that's coming into its own. (You can also find very good reproductions online.)

Eventually a completely unexpected turn of events in the Frame Story causes an unexpected nexus between "Marianne Wiggins" the narrator, the legacy of Edward Curtis, and even the title of the book. The author leaves behind the early themes of creating visual art and of comparing photography to painting. There's nothing wrong with the way the book treats these themes, but the unexpected plot element is what makes a seemingly predictable work into an exciting read. I don't want this to be a spoiler, so I'll stop now.
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This story weaves the past (1850-1950) and the present (post 9-11) where Wiggins, the author and also the narrator, tells the story of the legendary (but complicated) life of photographer Edward Curtis (and his family) along with her own introspective and retrospective look at her father's life. Both men were in search...were on the run...were absent and disappearing fathers...who left a trail of consequences behind.

Human beings are not what they seem to be on the surface - there are nuances and shadows which we will never fully understand - yet in many ways, we are all connected between the past and the present. Here are a few words from Wiggins' book to give you a flavor of the beautiful writing you can expect:

"I watch the smoke braid and rise into the tree, a shadow branching growth, a ghost, and I think about the ways that lives can intertwine, the way one life touches on another, our lives and all the lives of others a long continuous tread - a train - of independent yet contiguous action."

If you enjoyed this gem of a book, you'll love Wiggins' "Evidence of Things Unseen," a National Book Award finalist.
Windforge
Marianne Wiggins writes beautifully. She is a wordsmith, and reading her writing is a pleasure. However, I gave up an 8th of the way through the book because I was also bored to tears. Good writing and an intriguing story line obviously don't always go together. Perhaps if I had stuck with it, I might have liked it all, but I felt I had given up enough of my time in spite of the admiration I have for her ability to write.
Mash
I knew about Edward Curtis' photography before reading this book, but like several historical fiction novels I have read, this one left me wondering where the facts ended and the fiction began. I liked the way the story jumped back and forth between Edward's story--always keeping him at a distance--and the author's story about he father, but as the plot finally got moving, it seemed a bit contrived and left me wondering what REALLY happened. Was Curtis really that screwed up? Was there any truth to the story of his missing years? The most interesting parts, for me, had to do with action, not with the internal feelings of the various characters.
In this story we see Edward only from the outside, using carefully constructed bits of dialogue and action. This was undoubtedly the authors intent, but I would like to have had a three-dimensional picture of the man, not fragments of fact and fiction that left it to the reader to piece the story together.
The descriptions of the northwestern U.S. at that period, including the crude construction with walls so thin you could hear the women using the chamber pots in the next room, conveyed the feeling of that period rather nicely.
I'm just a reader, and this seemed to be a novel written for the critics or for the classroom. It felt cold, and in spite of the vivid descriptions of place, somewhat unreal. Perhaps what bothered my most about the book was the lack of humor; the mood was incessantly grim and serious.
In its favor, I did enjoy the story, but would have liked a more definitive ending. Reading this novel made me want to learn more about Edward Curtis' life.