» » A GIFT of the EMPEROR

Download A GIFT of the EMPEROR fb2

by Therese Park

Download A GIFT of the EMPEROR fb2
Author: Therese Park
ISBN: 0595350054
Language: English
Pages: 250 pages
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: iUniverse (May 5, 2005)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: lrf azw doc lit
FB2 size: 1834 kb | EPUB size: 1925 kb | DJVU size: 1828 kb
Sub: Fiction

Here, on an island with surreal beauty, Soon-ah is forced into prostitution as a comfort woman to the Japanese military.

Therese Park's "A Gift for the Emperor" is a hard book to read. Therese Park came to the United States to be a cellist with the Kansas City Philharmonic (now the Kansas City Symphony) in 1966. The hardships and abuses heaped upon the Korean Comfort Women is difficult to fathom and heart-breaking to bear. Keiko's journey is from innocence to abuse to hatred to love to loss and cynicism back to acceptance and hope. The writing is plain, the content horrific and stereotypical. I'm trouble by the history yet wonder how much the narrative contributes to healing. After 30 years, she retired and began writing.

Here, on an island with surreal beauty, Soon-ah is forced into prostitution as a comfort woman to the Japanese military

A Gift of the Emperor - Therese Park.

Here, on an island with surreal beauty, Soon-ah is forced into prostitution as a comfort woman to the Japanese military. A Gift of the Emperor - Therese Park. II. 1. On the front wall of our high school classroom hung a huge portrait of Emperor Hirohito.

Therese Park is a Korean author, now living in the US. An accomplished cellist, she moved to the US to perform with the Kansas City Philharmonic (now the Kansas City Symphony) in 1966. After 30 years, she retired and began writing full-time. A Gift of the Emperor (1997), her first novel, concerns a Korean schoolgirl, Soon-Ah, who is forced into military prostitution by the Japanese government during World War II.

Newcomer Park offers a graphic but stilted addition to the growing fiction (Nora Okja Keller's Comfort Woman, p. 161 . Like her classmates, she is chosen to be one of & Emperor's special gifts to the soldiers,'' a cynical euphemism for a cruel reality

Newcomer Park offers a graphic but stilted addition to the growing fiction (Nora Okja Keller's Comfort Woman, p. 161; Paul West's The Tent of Orange Mist, 1995, et. about Japanese exploitation of thousands of Asian women during WW II. Soon-ah's father, a Presbyterian minister, is murdered by the occupying Japanese, her mother is raped, and her elder brother is drafted and sent to fight in the Pacific. Like her classmates, she is chosen to be one of & Emperor's special gifts to the soldiers,'' a cynical euphemism for a cruel reality. Within days of their capture, Soon-ah and her friends are transported to a Japanese troopship bound for the Pacific war zone.

Books related to A Gift of the Emperor. Books related to A Gift of the Emperor.

This is apparently Therese Park's initial foray into writing, and this first attempt is very satisfying. Soon-ah, the book's protagonist, is presented with warmth, tenderness, and with a passion that is very tangible, but that never actually descends into being overly melo-dramatic.

There was a problem adding this item to Cart. Sorry, we're having trouble showing recommendations right now.

A Gift of the Emperor is the poignant fictional account of real-life atrocities inflicted upon more than 200,000 Asian women by the Japanese military during World War II. This haunting story is narrated by Soon-ah, a Korean schoolgirl whose life is shattered when Emperor Hirohito's soldiers abduct her from her village and ship her and her schoolmates to a "house of relaxation" in the South Pacific. Here, on an island with surreal beauty, Soon-ah is forced into prostitution as a "comfort woman" to the Japanese military. This scorching account of one woman's endurance of sexual degradation and the unspeakable horror of war provides compelling testimony to the strength of the human spirit, the power of love over hate, and the ultimate triumph of hope over despair. Rita Nakashima Brock, co-author of Casting Stone: Prostitution and Liberation in Asia and the United States wrote:"The searing horrors of history come alive in stories that add flesh and blood to the dry bones of evidence and news reports. Therese Park has given us such a vivid story Her intelligent, nuanced and humane work paints a portrait of human courage, hope, love, and survival under conditions most of us cannot even imagine"
Comments (5)
Snowseeker
What can I write!!! Very hard book to read because of the awful things that happened to the main character. WOW, how horrible people can be. Evil, evil, evil!! This is fiction but based on actual facts. This is a book that should be read, but it is very hard to forget. The book deserves an A+++
Nawenadet
I read "A Gift for the Emporer" in one sitting last night. I couldn't put it down! Compelling storyline and an authentic narrative voice! I found the main character of Soon-ah to be quite real and three-dimensional. The graphic and horrifying descriptions of what the Korean "comfort women" endured is a testimony and reminder of the horrors of war. Yet, there were several poignant scenes that made me hope Soon-ah would survive. I've read a number of novels inspired by the "comfort woman" history (Nora Okja Keller's "Comfort Woman" and Chang-rae Lee's "A Gesture Life"). Although those books contain lyrical and beautiful prose, I find that "A Gift of the Emporer" is the only novel that truly shows in great detail what atrocities these women suffered, and the strength and grace they showed in the face of the enemy. I enjoy literary fiction and beautiful poetic prose, but I think Ms. Park's clean and clear language, along with her ability to blend historical fact with fiction, makes "A Gift of the Emporer" one of the better fiction books on this topic. I highly recommend this book, especially for students. I also met Therese Park when she was on a book tour in California, and was very impressed with her passion and dedication towards creating more awareness for victims and survivors of war crimes. She is a gifted writer who shows great promise. I look forward to her next book.
Sennnel
Therese Park writes a gripping fictional account of real-life atrocities inflicted upon 200,000 Asian women (mostly Korean) during World War II. The novel tells the story of Soon-ah, a young Korean virgin, kidnapped from her village and forced into prostitution as a "comfort woman" to Japanese soldiers in a military brothel. This searing account of one woman's endurance of perhaps the most appalling horror of war -- the callous brutality with which human beings can treat one another -- provides compelling testimony to the strength of the human spirit, the power of love over hate, and the ultimate triumph of hope over despair. This book is especially recommended for college professors interested in teaching the impact of war upon non-combatants, especially women -- an especially topical issue.
Monn
As a woman and an avid student of Asian culture and history, the tragedy of Korea's so-called Comfort Women of WWII is a subject about which I read everything I possibly can.
Therese Park did an outstanding job of compiling the stories of many of these sad souls into a novel which, I believe, accurately depicts the conditions under which these women were forced to live.
I have lived in Korea for 10 years. I have read some documentary-type information about the later lives of the surviving Comfort Women. This novel would have been even better if the author had included some of the types of experiences the Comfort Women faced upon return to their Homeland.
I highly recommend this novel for those who desire to read fiction based strongly on historical fact.
Visonima
This is apparently Therese Park's initial foray into writing, and this first attempt is very satisfying. Soon-ah, the book's protagonist, is presented with warmth, tenderness, and with a passion that is very tangible, but that never actually descends into being overly melo-dramatic. The horrors of Soon-ah's captivity as a "comfort woman" by the Japanese are graphically described, not for the sake of gratuitousness, but to allow the reader to understand the circumstances. This is a moving fictional account of the horrible reality of war.