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by Frank Delaney

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Author: Frank Delaney
ISBN: 1400067847
Language: English
Pages: 416 pages
Category: Genre Fiction
Publisher: Random House; book club ed edition (February 8, 2011)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: rtf mbr lrf lrf
FB2 size: 1143 kb | EPUB size: 1957 kb | DJVU size: 1493 kb
Sub: Fiction

Frank Delaney is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel Ireland, as well as The Last Storyteller, The Matchmaker of Kenmare, Venetia Kelly’s Traveling Show, Tipperary, Shannon, and Simple Courage.

Frank Delaney is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel Ireland, as well as The Last Storyteller, The Matchmaker of Kenmare, Venetia Kelly’s Traveling Show, Tipperary, Shannon, and Simple Courage: A True Story of Peril on the Sea. A former judge for the Man Booker Prize, Delaney enjoyed a prominent career in BBC broadcasting before becoming a full-time writer. Delaney died in 2017.

Books in A Novel of Ireland (5 Book Series). A sequel to Venetia Kelly's Traveling Show, Frank Delaney takes us into the magical world of matchmaking and war, two passionate experiences that change one's life forever

Books in A Novel of Ireland (5 Book Series). Page 1 of 1Start OverPage 1 of 1. Previous page. 1. The Last Storyteller: A Novel of Ireland. 2. The Matchmaker of Kenmare: A Novel o. rank Delaney. A sequel to Venetia Kelly's Traveling Show, Frank Delaney takes us into the magical world of matchmaking and war, two passionate experiences that change one's life forever. Kate Begley has the gifts of matchmaking and visions which portend bright or brutal events in the future. It's a world that Ben MacCarthy follows eagerly, himself being a writer of folklore from any and all cultures.

The matchmaker of Kenmare: a novel of Ireland, Frank Delaney. We were one of the very few countries in Europe immune from the conflict, because we had taken up a position of neutrality. p. cm. eISBN: 978-0-679-60433-4. Controversial among our geographical neighbors, and sometimes even among ourselves, I agreed with it.

Frank Delaney (24 October 1942 – 21 February 2017) was an Irish novelist, journalist and broadcaster

Frank Delaney (24 October 1942 – 21 February 2017) was an Irish novelist, journalist and broadcaster. He was the author of The New York Times best-seller Ireland, the non-fiction book Simple Courage: A True Story of Peril on the Sea, and many other works of fiction, non-fiction and collections. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland. Delaney began working as a newsreader for the Irish state radio and television network RTÉ in 1970

The Matchmaker Of Kenmare: A Novel Of Ireland.

The Matchmaker Of Kenmare book. Start by marking The Matchmaker Of Kenmare: A Novel Of Ireland as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Matchmaker Of Kenmare: A Novel Of Ireland.

Matchmaker Of Kenmare, The Delaney, Frank Random House (USA) .

Matchmaker Of Kenmare, The Delaney, Frank Random House (USA) 9781400067848 : In July 1943, as World War II rattles Europe, Ben McCarthy (returning narrator of Venetia Kellys Traveling Show) m. Описание: Author Frank Delaney sweeps readers off to Ireland with this novel that captures the eternal magnetism of the island and its tumultuous history. It is a story of an extraordinary land which unfolds through pre-history to modern times.

Электронная книга "The Matchmaker of Kenmare: A Novel of Ireland", Frank Delaney

Электронная книга "The Matchmaker of Kenmare: A Novel of Ireland", Frank Delaney. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Matchmaker of Kenmare: A Novel of Ireland" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Many hours south of there, another driver in another van took over from him, a man old as my father. He tried to give me a gun: I handed it back. He froze me for a moment. I thought he might attack,.

Frank Delaney’s masterful storytelling skillfully interweaves myth . Frank Delaney – Photo Courtesy Of Jerry Bauer.

Frank Delaney’s masterful storytelling skillfully interweaves myth, history and plot to breathe life into this tale of a man on a journey towards self-discovery. This is a book of love, lost and found. The love story of Venetia and Ben began with Venetia Kelly’s Traveling Show: A Novel of Ireland and continued with The Matchmaker of Kenmare: A Novel of Ireland. The story is set in the mid-1950’s, a time when Ireland was a new nation struggling to find its course.

He meets Kate Begley, known as the Matchmaker of Kenmare and they become . Neutrality is a theme throughout the book. 11 thoughts on The Matchmaker of Kenmare by Frank Delaney

He meets Kate Begley, known as the Matchmaker of Kenmare and they become friends. Ireland was neutral during the war but that didn’t stop Ben and Kate’s involvement, after Kate’s husband Charles Miller, an American soldier is reported killed in action. I found it hard to get interested in the story at the beginning and in fact stopped reading it for a while. As Frank Delaney writes in his Author’s Note. he word neutrality has many shades. 11 thoughts on The Matchmaker of Kenmare by Frank Delaney. says: March 15, 2011 at 11:48 am.

“And there’s a legend—she had only vague details—that all couples who are meant to marry are connected by an invisible silver cord which is wrapped around their ankles at birth, and in time the matchmaking gods pull those cords tighter and tighter and draw the couple slowly toward one another until they meet.” So says Miss Kate Begley, Matchmaker of Kenmare, the enigmatic woman Ben MacCarthy meets in the summer of 1943. As World War II rages on, Ben remains haunted by the mysterious disappearance of his wife, the actress Venetia Kelly. Searching for purpose by collecting stories for the Irish Folklore Commission, he travels to a remote seaside cottage to profile the aforementioned Matchmaker of Kenmare. Ben is immediately captivated by the forthright Miss Begley, who is remarkably self-assured in her instincts but provincial in her experience. Miss Begley is determined to see that Ben moves through his grief—and a powerful friendship is forged along the way. But when Charles Miller, a striking American military intelligence officer, arrives on the scene, Miss Begley develops an intense infatuation and looks to make a match for herself. Miller needs a favor, but it will be dangerous. Under the cover of their neutrality as Irish citizens, Miss Begley and Ben travel to London and effectively operate as spies. As they are drawn more deeply and painfully into the conflict, both discover the perils of neutrality—in both love and war.Steeped in colorful history, The Matchmaker of Kenmare is a stirring story of friendship and sacrifice. New York Times bestselling author Frank Delaney has written a lush and surprising novel, rich as myth, tense as a thriller, and like all grand tales—harrowing, sometimes hilarious, and heartbreaking.
Comments (7)
Levion
I truly enjoy Mr. Delaney's writing. I absolutely enjoyed Shannon, Ireland and Tipperary. Venetia Kelly was all right, but at least it wasn't nearly as implausible as Matchmaker. For the record, I read too much military history, concentrating mostly in World War II. I doubt that anyone will think I'm spoiling the outcome of the book -- which is another matter altogether -- by complaining about the absolutely unbelievable thread about the Irish couple's chance encounter with Joachim Pieper in the middle of the Battle of the Bulge. Imagine, if you can, an Irish Hansel and Gretel traipsing through the lines in the dead of winter without much challenge, only to be near enough to witness the massacre at Malmedy. To say that it strains credulity is to misuse the phrase. It's not crucial to the story. It's not even minimally plausible. At least I don't think so; truth is stranger than fiction. But to think this pair waltzes through one of the most contested areas on the face of the earth at that time and come out unscathed -- not to mention just being there in the first place -- is mindblowing. I almost expected Forrest Gump to show up.

The main story is rather dull. It's about a quasi-love triangle that does have some interesting and timeless elements. Unfortunately, the whole Pieper thread combined with the giraffe -- shades of Water For Elephants? -- was too jarring for me to enjoy the book.

Nevertheless, and with the thought that in trilogies the second installment is typically the weakest, I will soldier on -- sorry, I couldn't resist -- and take up The Last Storyteller.

Every author has a hiccup. This was Mr. Delaney's.
Zeleence
A sequel to Venetia Kelly's Traveling Show, Frank Delaney takes us into the magical world of matchmaking and war, two passionate experiences that change one's life forever. Kate Begley has the gifts of matchmaking and visions which portend bright or brutal events in the future. It's a world that Ben MacCarthy follows eagerly, himself being a writer of folklore from any and all cultures. But Ben's stories are about to evolve into more realistic and horrific tales of "Referred Passion," wherein one loves one person but fiercely embraces another. Kate even says early on, "That's me and you. Friendship is a choice...Love isn't." Ben hears it with innocence and wonder but will soon see it is prescient in its truth.

We meet various characters who are quite powerful in the early days of WWII and enable Kate and Ben to go where they will. Ireland is attempting to remain neutral, if that is ever possible. After some beautiful scenes where potential lovers are introduced to each other for marriage purposes, the tale turns more sinister. Kate and Ben abet the kidnapping of a spy who has information vital about Hitler and his plans for the war and world domination. Kate then falls in love with a military spy, Charles Miller, and they marry after making a secret agreement that is rather mysterious itself. Charles goes missing in war, is reported to be dead, and Kate refuses to believe he is gone.

Thus begins a journey through storms of rain, bullets, bombings, snow, massacres, and so much more that bring the brutal reality of the war to the reader in a breathtaking manner. The horror grows and Ben's thoughts about neutrality undergo traumatic changes. War is Hell, indeed!

This novel begins with a tepid, endearing start but quickly evolves into a blood-curdling, adventurous, and memorable war story. We keep waiting for Kate and Ben will move beyond friendship; they do but not in the way the reader is anticipating. Love and passion rule the day, with new interactions that are quite novel and remarkable. Frank Delaney is a gifted writer who has penned a beautiful, haunting tale that readers will relish and remember, for sure!
Moronydit
Since I first read Ireland by Frank Delaney I knew that any further novels by him would be pure gold. Rest assured, my instinct was correct. His subsequent novels Tipperary and Shannon were both incredible stories; a rich tapestry of myth, tradition, and the indomitable spirit of humanity in the face of adversity. After finishing Shannon, I found to my delight that he would be releasing yet another story; this time called The Last Storyteller. I was dismayed however, to find that this was the last story of a trilogy; the other two stories having eluded my attention. Not being able to find the first two titles in any local bookshops (including bigger chain stores), I next took to scouring the internet to find them. Sure enough, on Amazon I found copies of the books and at really good prices. I purchased the first book and recieved it rather quickly which made it all the better (A++ for the seller, Central Valley Books). As for the story, it is trademark Frank Delaney; that is to say every story seems to take on a child-like nostalgia for a country he loves. I have not as of yet finished the book but surely it carries on the way his others do: a meaningful, meandering, journey through a country built on colorful history of which Delaney wrote in Tipperary: "We Irish enjoy the story part of history".

Ignore the fact that it is the first part of a trilogy and just enjoy. Some cannot disregard this and focus on the "unresolved" nature of the book but by definition the first in a trilogy is an introduction to character and conflict. Take it for what it is and I'm sure you'll be surprised. Oh and definitely buy from Central Valley Books, they have excellent prices and great service.
Venemarr
I love Frank DeLaneys Ireland, Tipperarry and The Last Storyteller. I read the Amethysts now this one. All great information and personal perspectives. Lovely Story just not my top pick.
Peras
Haven't finished it yet, but Frank's books are so engaging that I like them all.