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by Yei Theodora Ozaki

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Author: Yei Theodora Ozaki
ISBN: 1406843539
Language: English
Pages: 136 pages
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Echo Library (May 1, 2007)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: lit mobi mbr lrf
FB2 size: 1477 kb | EPUB size: 1254 kb | DJVU size: 1229 kb
Sub: Fiction

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Yei Theodora Ozaki's classic collection of traditional Japanese Fairy Tales, also published under the title The Japanese Fairy Book. Translated into English by Ozaki.

THIS collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a sugges-tion made to me indirectly through a friend by. .

THIS collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a sugges-tion made to me indirectly through a friend by Mr. Andrew Lang. They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. Grateful acknowledgment is due to Mr. Y. Yasuoka, Miss Fusa Okamoto, my brother Nobumori Ozaki, Dr. Yoshihiro Takaki, and Miss Kameko Yamao, who have helped me with translations. The story which I have named The Story of the Man who did not Wish to Die is taken from a little book written a hundred years ago by one Shinsui Tamenaga. It is named Chosei Furo, or Longevity.

Start listening to Fairy Tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki on your phone right now with Player FM's free mobile app, the best podcasting experience on both iPhone and Android

Start listening to Fairy Tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki on your phone right now with Player FM's free mobile app, the best podcasting experience on both iPhone and Android.

Theodora Ozaki was the daughter of a wealthy Japanese aristocrat Baron Ozaki, the first Japanese man to study in the West, and his wife, an American schoolteacher's daughter. The couple separated after a brief marriage and Theodora lived with her father in Japan. She worked as a secretary and spent much of her spare time collecting traditional Japanese stories.

They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved, they have been told more with the view to interest young readers of the West than the technical student of folk-lore.

Yei Theodora Ozaki (英子セオドラ尾崎, Eiko Seodora Ozaki, 1871 – December 28, 1932) was an early 20th-century translator of Japanese short stories and fairy tales

Yei Theodora Ozaki (英子セオドラ尾崎, Eiko Seodora Ozaki, 1871 – December 28, 1932) was an early 20th-century translator of Japanese short stories and fairy tales. Her translations were fairly liberal but have been popular, and were reprinted several times after her death. According to "A Biographical Sketch" by Mrs. Hugh Fraser, included in the introductory material to Warriors of old Japan, and other stories, Ozaki came from an unusual background.

Their only neighbour was a bad and malicious badger e in carefully cultivating. The badger at last grew so ruthless in his mischievous work, and did so much harm everywhere on the farm, that the good-natured farmer could not stand it any longer, and determined to put a stop to it. So he lay in wait day after day and night after night, with a big club, hoping to catch the badger, but all in vain

Read Japanese fairy tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki, and . Author William Elliot Griffis wrote Japanese Fairy World, a collection of fairy tales and folk tales arriving in Japan in 1870 to reach English; the book was also published as The Fire-fly’s Lovers and Other Fairy Tales of Old Japan.

Read Japanese fairy tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki, and from the collections of Grace James and Matilda Chaplin Ayrton. Jump to full list of Japanese tales. About: Japanese folklore has remained a topic of interest for people across the world. The culture wasn’t without its own authors, however, as author Yei Theodora Ozaki, was of Japanese heritage.

This collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a suggestion made to me indirectly through a friend by Mr. Andrew Lang. They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved, they have been told more with the view to interest young readers of the West than the technical student of folk - lore. Grateful acknowledgment is due to Mr. Y. Yasuoka, Miss Fusa Okamoto, my brother Nobumori Ozaki, Dr. Yoshihiro Takaki, and Miss Kameko Yamao, who have helped me with translations.
Comments (7)
Jorius
Have you ever wondered what it means to read Japanese Fairy Tales are like?

If you are like me, and used to European Fairy Tales, then these will seem a little different, namely, when the hero comes in and does his heroly deed, he doesn't simply marry the princess and live happily ever after, or ride off with his sidekick into the sunset. Apparently, the Japanese need a little more closure about the remaining life of the hero, so there are about 5-10 obligatory pages chronicling the fame and fortune of the hero before the actual ending of the book. This makes the stories seem a bit long winded and fluffy at first, but you get used to it after a while. Its true that the kindle freebie version is a bit lacking in format and spell checking, but this didn't bother me because I paid 99 cents for it.
Seevinev
Thirty-eight wonderful, imaginative tales some of my favorites including "The Peony Lantern" for it's sad story of the master's hunt for his lost love, "The Robe of Feathers" for it's description of the fairies and the lightness of their tread upon the sand and "The Jelly-Fish Takes a Journey" for the humorous exchange between jelly-fish and monkey. Kindle version has an active table of content so you can read any of the tales in any order you choose. I only wish that the book had been illustrated as this one seems to be made for it. Really enjoyable!
Andriodtargeted
I'm a fan of Japanese "things" and thought i could tell my grandkids some of these at bedtime. Some are certainly not for bedtime and i think two are Chinese, not Japanese. No matter, they are great stories just the same. I read the whole thing at one shot (over 3 days) and still remember some of them. Definitely older fairy tales, unless you have a decent understanding of their history and thought processes, might be a bit confusing as to why this guy did these things or why a dragon laying across the road is commonplace.

Will be reading these to the young'uns and have already told the older kids some of the better ones. Will read again
Lo◘Ve
Well-translated and written book. The stories were very interesting, but I gave this book 5 stars because it was formatted well. There's many books for Kindle that show poor formatting and amateurish writing skills. Not this book. I'm very glad to have bought it and will keep it permanently in my virtual bookshelf for friends and family.
Tcaruieb
I have a Kindle on my Samsung Galaxy S, and on my Google Nexus 7, and on my PC. All three versions of this book look great and are well formatted. Perhaps there were issues with previous releases or with earlier versions of Kindle. I know a LOT of Shakespeare was really messed up in Kindle formats (due to the style of the theatrical text formatting).

This is a collection of Japanese folk tales more than anything. The stories collected here are among the most popular. They are varied and quite enjoyable. I actually started reading this due to my interest in Ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world - basically Japanese wood block prints). Many of the Ukiyo-e artists had themes centered on characters and events from these tales. I was surprised that even the very first story was spot on with the summary under one of Yoshitsune's prints. Even the second story was one that was familiar to me.

The tales all seem to have a lesson or moral to learn. They are quick reads and quite enjoyable. Most are what I would consider appropriate for all ages, though in the manner of many international tales, there is a bit of violence here and there. But what child doesn't remember the famous tale of humpty dumpty and the violent crash.

Best of all it's free to download!
fetish
Thanks to a Good reads challenge, I was encouraged to find and read fairy tales from a different culture. These Japanese tales fit the bill. I had never heard of fairy tales from Japan, so was pleased to find these. The tales were entertaining, though not always satisfying. The endings of some left the reader hanging.
I was able to purchase audible for the book, which made the reading even more enjoyable.
Open your horizons and experience Japanese Fairy Tales.
Nuadazius
We downloaded this book for our weekend getaway trip, and it was the best decision. There are 22 stories, between 9 and 30 minutes long. The stories are great, with lots of details and no sugar coating. They reminded me of old Russian fairy tales. My 9 year old kept asking to turn it back on whenever I needed to pause for one reason or the other.
An entertaining little compendium of fantastic tales that usually revolve around animals.
Mean and petty women also abound, as well as moral stories about filial piety.
Not surprisingly, there are some similarities with Western fairy tales.
These stories, however, will not really give you any insight into Japanese culture. Rather, you should approach this book with at least some basic knowledge about Japanese way of life.