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by Evelyn Waugh

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Author: Evelyn Waugh
ISBN: 0316917338
Language: English
Pages: 320 pages
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Back Bay Books; 1st edition (August 15, 2002)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: doc docx mobi azw
FB2 size: 1923 kb | EPUB size: 1477 kb | DJVU size: 1792 kb
Sub: Fiction

A novel by. Evelyn waugh

A novel by. Evelyn waugh. With love to. Mary and dorothy lygon. The scene of the novel was a fanciful confusion of many territories. It was natural for people to suppose that it derived from Abyssinia, at that time the sole independent native monarchy.

Black Mischief was Evelyn Waugh's third novel, published in 1932. The novel chronicles the efforts of the English-educated Emperor Seth, assisted by a fellow Oxford graduate, Basil Seal, to modernize his Empire, the fictional African island of Azania, located in the Indian Ocean off the eastern coast of Africa. The novel was written by Waugh whilst staying as a house guest at Madresfield Court in Worcestershire. The old nursery had been converted into a writing room for Waugh

Black Mischief, " Waugh's third novel, helped to establish his reputation as a master satirist

Black Mischief, " Waugh's third novel, helped to establish his reputation as a master satirist. Set on the fictional African island of Azania, the novel chronicles the efforts of Emperor Seth, assisted by the Englishman Basil Seal, to modernize his kingdom. In other books Waugh gleefully ridiculed Americans as well Evelyn Waugh’s Black Mischief, published in 1932, recounts the unfortunate attempts of Seth, sovereign of the mythical East African Empire of Azania, to modernise his dominions. In this he is aided (although perhaps aided is the wrong word) by Basil Seal, an unscrupulous an incompetent English adventurer.

Evelyn Waugh kept a diary almost continuously from the age of seven until a year before his death in 1966, and extracts from the diaries caused sensation when they were published by in The Observer.

Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology (Library of America). Evelyn Waugh kept a diary almost continuously from the age of seven until a year before his death in 1966, and extracts from the diaries caused sensation when they were published by in The Observer. Providing the background to the novels which made Waugh.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. The island of Azania, east of Somaliland and west of the Gulf of Aden, straddles the equator.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. We are Progress and the New Age. Nothing can stand in our way. When Oxford-educated Emperor Seth succeeds to the throne of the African state of Azania.

Evelyn Waugh - Black Mischief.

Evelyn Waugh, Black Mischief. Evelyn Waugh - Black Mischief. Internet Archive HTML5 Uploader .

Evelyn Waugh Evelyn Waugh was born in Hampstead in 1903, second son of Arthur . In 1964 he published his last book, A Little Learning, the first volume of an autobiography.

Evelyn Waugh was born in Hampstead in 1903, second son of Arthur Waugh, publisher and literary critic, and brother of Alec Waugh, the popular novelist. He was educated at Lancing and Hertford College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. Evelyn Waugh was received into the Roman Catholic Church in 1930 and his biography of the Elizabethan Jesuit martyr, Edmund Campion, was awarded the Hawthornden Prize in 1936. In 1959 he published the official Life of Ronald Knox.

Le Président Carnot Matodi March 8th My Dear Stanley, I am writing this before disembarking. It will be posted at Marseilles and should reach you as nearly as I can calculate on 17th of the month I wrote to you from Durban, Sara. It will be posted at Marseilles and should reach you as nearly as I can calculate on 17th of the month I wrote to you from Durban, Sarah and I decided to break our return journey in Azania. The English boat did not stop here. So we had to change at Aden into this outward-bound French ship. Very dirty and unseamanlike.

Black Mischief, " Waugh's third novel, helped to establish his reputation as a master satirist. Set on the fictional African island of Azania, the novel chronicles the efforts of Emperor Seth, assisted by the Englishman Basil Seal, to modernize his kingdom. Profound hilarity ensues from the issuance of homemade currency, the staging of a "Birth Control Gala, " the rightful ruler's demise at his own rather long and tiring coronation ceremonies, and a good deal more mischief.
Comments (7)
fightnight
I clicked the boxes on the new, dumbed down Amazon review writing page, but I must say it doesn't admit any nuance. Five stars, they say means "I Love It", which is not what I mean at all when I give something five stars. So why did I now? Because I'm reading Evelyn Waugh's Letters, and I'm at the part where a Roman Catholic paper publishes diatribes against this novel. All I can say is they don't get it. This novel, like all of his novels (or all I'm familiar with) is satire, and not meant to be advice for good living, correct doctrine, or any sort of propaganda. You can't have read one novel by Waugh and think that's what he writes. However, I can imagine that the paper could not do him any greater service than lambast his novel, since, then as now, readers would flock to it were it forbidden.
I found it endlessly witty, and if asked what it satirizes, I'd say it's the idea of British Imperialism, of which many earnest novels were being written in his day. At the same time he wrote fiction, he was writing travel books. I've just finished "Labels" (the British title), which is one, but there was another, called "Remote People" which he wrote around the same time, and which I've not read. but which, I think, provides some of the regional background or local color for this novel. Also, there are bits in the Letters I recognize as turning up in this novel.
There is a corollary to the incredibly idiotic post-modern attempt to read everything backwards so as to deconstruct it in the fact that when Waugh's most famous novel, "Brideshead Revisited" was published, it was dismissed as religious propaganda, which shows how virulently anti-Catholic England in many ways still was. No one reads it that way now. It's been made into a mini-series, a movie, and reprinted in numerous ediitons. A great many readers have apparently got through it and lived to tell the tale. And so with this novel. Waugh himself thought it a rattling, ripping story, and laughed as he wrote it, as may also readers who take it in the same generous, if satiric spirit.
Jarortr
It would be so easy to knock this novel, originally published in 1932, as a product of its time that holds little appeal for modern readers. And, truthfully, there is a lot that is very un-PC here. Taking place in an east-African island nation between two revolutions, it traces the quick rise and fall of the Emperor Seth, an African of some Western education. Many would find his depiction of the natives reason enough to condemn the novel. However, Waugh's brutal treatment of everyone--British, French, Indians, Arabs, and more--makes it ridiculous to hold anything against him. He is an equal opportunity satirist.

In fact, this is a very funny novel that lets loose with some barbs that can still find their way home in the twenty-first century. His portrayal of the useless English envoy and his family is right on target as an example of the reward-over-substance political appointment, played alongside the classic scheming French envoy. Even more humorous is the portrayal of Dame Mildred and Miss Tin as the "PETA"-types among the cannibals. But the novel really moves with Basil Seal, whose self-serving attempts to help Emperor Seth Westernize Azania seem like the right thing to do but lead to disaster after disaster. Seal is great as the truly intelligent guy who can't help but do stupid things.

And these are just a few examples on top of a host of funny minor characters--a gone-native English general with his native wife, native royalty, ridiculous prelates and abbots, and an Indian who always manages to survive and make a profit. They deal with such issues as daily executions, making the single train line run, family planning among the natives, and managing to survive the revolts and revolutions. If taken in the right spirit, this is an enjoyable Waugh classic.
Aurizar
Be forewarned, this is a highly vicious but often outrageously funny satirical novel that skewers both white-Westerners and black-Africans. No one, regardless of sex, race, color, creed, national origin, or social status, is left fully clothed by the time Waugh is done showing how all "emperors" eventually have no clothes. But this is not a novel designed to delve into the inner workings of "real" characters or to discuss philosophical or religious issues like good & evil or the meaning of life. Everyone is a type (e.g., upper crust cad) or used as a necessary foil (e.g.,the paranoid French diplomat who is clueless as to how clueless his British counterparts are), so no character comes across completely as someone who actually could exist in the real world. And even though Waugh did travel extensively in Ethiopia in the 1930s, an experience he used for this novel, this is not a work designed primarily to make the reader feel as if they are getting a detailed, intimate, and realistic portrait of a place now brought to vivid life.

This is the very first Waugh novel I've read. I plan on reading more. My primary loves in 20th Century English literature are K. Amis, A. Burgess, G. Greene, and G. Orwell. Amis can be equally funny ("Lucky Jim") and his characters usually have a greater depth and more vivid life as potential people. Burgess, Greene, & Orwell usually delve deeply into the philosophical or religious issues and can bring a place to life for the reader. If you love this book, read Greene's "Our Man in Havana" or Burgess' "Devil of a State". Both are comic novels set in the 3rd world.

As comic novels go this is a 4 mainly because the last third isn't quite as funny as the first two thirds and the cynical worldview in such concentrated form is a bit wearying by the time the carnage is over and those who survive exit unredeemed and unrepentent.