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by Siddhartha Deb

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Author: Siddhartha Deb
ISBN: 0330493566
Language: English
Pages: 240 pages
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Picador (July 19, 2002)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: azw txt lrf mbr
FB2 size: 1365 kb | EPUB size: 1497 kb | DJVU size: 1628 kb
Sub: Fiction

Siddhartha Deb (Bengali: সিদ্ধাৰ্থ দেব) (born 1970) is an Indian author who . His first non-fiction book, The Beautiful And the Damned: A Portrait of the New India was published in June 2011 by Viking Penguin.

Siddhartha Deb (Bengali: সিদ্ধাৰ্থ দেব) (born 1970) is an Indian author who was born in Meghalaya and grew up in Shillong in northeastern India.

Point Of Return book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Set in the remote, northeastern hills of India, The point of return.

Set in the remote, northeastern hills of India, The point of return revolves around the father-son relationship of a willful, curious boy, Babu, and Doctor Dam, an enigmatic product of British colonial rule and Nehruvian nationalism

Set in the remote, northeastern hills of India, The point of return revolves around the father-son relationship of a willful, curious boy, Babu, and Doctor Dam, an enigmatic product of British colonial rule and Nehruvian nationalism.

It opens with an old man falling down. Dr Dam takes a "plunge away from the world he had always known" on to the carpet

It opens with an old man falling down. Dr Dam takes a "plunge away from the world he had always known" on to the carpet. It opens with an old man falling down. Dr Dam takes a "plunge away from the world he had always known" on to the carpet

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The Beautiful and the Damned: A Portrait of the New India Aug 30, 2011.

The Point of Return Siddhartha Deb has imagined a kind of Indian Don Quixote.

Audiobooks Now. B&N. Siddhartha Deb has imagined a kind of Indian Don Quixote. The interplay of political events and intergenerational conflict is wonderfully portrayed. San Diego Union-Tribune.

Point of return : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. by. Deb, Siddhartha, 1970-. The Point of Return poignantly explores the precarious balance of familial relationships built around secrets and the intrusions of political conflicts outside the control of individuals. From start to finish it is a powerful, moving, and unforgettable story. Internet Archive Books.

Siddhartha Deb. Siddhartha Deb, who teaches creative writing at the New School, is the author of two novels: The Point of Return, which was a 2003 New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and An Outline of the Republic. Join PEN America Today. Defend free expression, support persecuted writers, and promote literary culture.

A moving story of a young man's relationship with his father and with India's pastThis is the story of a father and son, Dr Dam and Babu. The father crossed to India from Bangladesh at Partition. He knew nothing of the world he and his family had been catapulted into, but he made his way as best he could, always sticking to his principles and being guided by his morals. For this he earned himself a reputation as a strange and rather unlucky man, but he also gained the respect of many colleagues and acquaintances. As his father weakens and wearies of life, Babu, his son, begins to learn and understand a little better all that his father has gone through. He begins to retrace Dr Dam's long journey from childhood right up to his experiences in the present, including his endless fight with the bureaucratic corruption and indifference that surrounded him in his work. In this way Babu starts to pull together both his own family's life and the turbulence of the years that followed Partition.Deb writes in the most moving and delicate way about the hidden stories of India. He has an eye for the most delicious and insightful details of everyday life, and the warmth and talent to tell a story both from the personal and from the historical perspective with great success.
Comments (6)
Faezahn
It is an unfortunate aspect of our culture that novels by South Asian authors are so often viewed as a means to escape from the hum-drum of our Western, suburban lives, an escape to a place of monsoons and mangoes and curries. Siddhartha Deb's first novel may be set in East India, but it takes place in the heart.

Deb's novel is not a coming of age novel so much as an insightful look at what it means to be a young adult reflecting on the humanity of one's parents - the people to whom we are closest, but somehow never really know. It's also a reflection on those people and experiences that mold who we, as unique individuals, become.

Much of Deb's book, I suspect, will, as it must, be familiar with the many men and women who were, in one way or another, displaced by the partition of India, the 1971 liberation war in Bangladesh, and the communalism in which the subcontinent continues to simmer.

But the beauty of Deb's novel is not in the vivid depictions of life in social and political tumult, it is in his brilliant rendering of universal experiences - the search for grounding, for self, for home.
Kanrad
In this sensitively imagined and astutely observed novel, Babu, son of veterinarian Dr. Dam, reminisces about his father's life, trying to understand him--at least to the extent that sons can ever understand their fathers. Acutely aware that every generation views events and experiences through knowledge gained during own lifetimes, Babu recognizes that though he and his father have shared many events, their views of these events are vastly different, in each case conditioned by their separate, though sometimes intersecting, pasts.
The Dam family is Bengali, managing to escape the 1979 civil war there by fleeing to Assam, a remote, northeastern province of India nestled between Bangladesh and Bhutan. Supporting his elderly parents and several brothers and sisters, and marrying and starting a family late in life, Dr. Dam has spent his career as an honest civil servant within a corrupt Indian government. Babu, born in India, has never known the places which shaped the lives of his father and grandparents and which still live in their hearts. Separated by both temperament and by dissimilar backgrounds, Dr. Dam and Babu are remote from each other until they are brought together dramatically through Dr. Dam's debilitating stroke.

Deb's straightforward and often elegant prose is particularly effective for its subtlety. Lacking the lush description so frequently found in novels with Indian settings, the novel concentrates instead on universal values and the father-son search for understanding. The novel is less exotic, despite its unusual setting, than some other Indian novels, but more accessible to readers from other cultures and more potent in its observations about life. In an ironic twist, the author uses his clear, unadorned prose to provide Dr. Dam's personal history in a chronology which, though linear, moves backward in time, as Babu, aged seventeen, recalls what he knows of his father and the events and people which have influenced him.
The reverse chronology is much like the history we all create for our parents whenever we try to mine our own experiences for insights into their lives in an effort to find common ground and understand who we think they are. We recall past events in their lives which we think are important based on our own experiences, not theirs. With its focus both on a man coming to terms with his father's life, and on everyone's yearning for a homeland, even after it is gone, Deb provides observations which expand our own view of what forms our characters, and gives us new insights into universal truths. Mary Whipple
nadness
This is no light or easy read; the chronology and narrative perspective of this book change, and the shifts are sometimes unsettling. This I took to be part of the author's design, and by the end of the book I found it effective, a part of the chaos of memory that speaks true. I also found myself wishing the overleaf of the book had a map of the regions, as place is so important in the novel and I was unfamiliar with more than basic Indian geography. I would recommend that a reader unfamiliar with these regions print out a map (and also note what the country looked like in the days before Partition) before beginning on this literary journey. It's a journey I'm glad to have made, and although I have not yet undertaken a second read, that was my first impulse when I came to the end -- I felt there was so much more for me to mine from the intertwined stories of Babu's and Dr. Dam's lives as shared by Deb than I had been able to absorb in one pass. A good writer writes what he knows and speaks the truth -- much easier said than done -- and Deb has done both quite beautifully in this book.
Meztihn
Debs first novel is an eye opener; the type of book that changes the way one looks at his/her surroundings, as well as reflect at his/her roots. A true classic of the 21st century. His writing immerses us in a dark, rainy and cold world where life exists among the puddles. The characters as well as the atmosphere seem to flow from the pages and form around us naturally, without rough descriptions or departures from the story. Everything is seamlessly intergrated into the flow of the life within the novel. The story instantly picks up and throws us into an unfamiliar world, yet one that is easily imaginable. With Deb at the lead, the trip seems to follow a thread through time; a mystery of where he is taking us, as well as who is taking us there. Anticipation mounts as details drip from the pages like slowly brewing coffee. The story really shines in his expression of humanity; characters are real and their thoughts and emotions can be felt althought not written. This book shows how a book can expresses a story without degrading its quality with words. True stories are expressed with emotions, and Deb perfectly expresses these emotions here. " Commercial truckers preferred to sleep through the day and pull out at night in large groups, headlights blinking and swaying against the dark slopes rising towards an equally dark sky, lit up on winter nights with the pinpoints of celestial travellers. " (Deb, 42)
Haal
It is an unfortunate aspect of our culture that novels by South Asian authors are so often viewed as a means to escape from the hum-drum of our Western, suburban lives, an escape to a place of monsoons and mangoes and curries. Siddhartha Deb's first novel may be set in East India, but it takes place in the heart.

Deb's novel is not a coming of age novel so much as an insightful look at what it means to be a young adult reflecting on the humanity of one's parents - the people to whom we are closest, but somehow never really know. It's also a reflection on those people and experiences that mold who we, as unique individuals, become.

Much of Deb's book, I suspect, will, as it must, be familiar with the many men and women who were, in one way or another, displaced by the partition of India, the 1971 liberation war in Bangladesh, and the communalism in which the subcontinent continues to simmer.

But the beauty of Deb's novel is not in the vivid depictions of life in social and political tumult, it is in his brilliant rendering of universal experiences - the search for grounding, for self, for home.
godlike
In this sensitively imagined and astutely observed novel, Babu, son of veterinarian Dr. Dam, reminisces about his father's life, trying to understand him--at least to the extent that sons can ever understand their fathers. Acutely aware that every generation views events and experiences through knowledge gained during own lifetimes, Babu recognizes that though he and his father have shared many events, their views of these events are vastly different, in each case conditioned by their separate, though sometimes intersecting, pasts.
The Dam family is Bengali, managing to escape the 1979 civil war there by fleeing to Assam, a remote, northeastern province of India nestled between Bangladesh and Bhutan. Supporting his elderly parents and several brothers and sisters, and marrying and starting a family late in life, Dr. Dam has spent his career as an honest civil servant within a corrupt Indian government. Babu, born in India, has never known the places which shaped the lives of his father and grandparents and which still live in their hearts. Separated by both temperament and by dissimilar backgrounds, Dr. Dam and Babu are remote from each other until they are brought together dramatically through Dr. Dam's debilitating stroke.

Deb's straightforward and often elegant prose is particularly effective for its subtlety. Lacking the lush description so frequently found in novels with Indian settings, the novel concentrates instead on universal values and the father-son search for understanding. The novel is less exotic, despite its unusual setting, than some other Indian novels, but more accessible to readers from other cultures and more potent in its observations about life. In an ironic twist, the author uses his clear, unadorned prose to provide Dr. Dam's personal history in a chronology which, though linear, moves backward in time, as Babu, aged seventeen, recalls what he knows of his father and the events and people which have influenced him.
The reverse chronology is much like the history we all create for our parents whenever we try to mine our own experiences for insights into their lives in an effort to find common ground and understand who we think they are. We recall past events in their lives which we think are important based on our own experiences, not theirs. With its focus both on a man coming to terms with his father's life, and on everyone's yearning for a homeland, even after it is gone, Deb provides observations which expand our own view of what forms our characters, and gives us new insights into universal truths. Mary Whipple
TheFresh
This is no light or easy read; the chronology and narrative perspective of this book change, and the shifts are sometimes unsettling. This I took to be part of the author's design, and by the end of the book I found it effective, a part of the chaos of memory that speaks true. I also found myself wishing the overleaf of the book had a map of the regions, as place is so important in the novel and I was unfamiliar with more than basic Indian geography. I would recommend that a reader unfamiliar with these regions print out a map (and also note what the country looked like in the days before Partition) before beginning on this literary journey. It's a journey I'm glad to have made, and although I have not yet undertaken a second read, that was my first impulse when I came to the end -- I felt there was so much more for me to mine from the intertwined stories of Babu's and Dr. Dam's lives as shared by Deb than I had been able to absorb in one pass. A good writer writes what he knows and speaks the truth -- much easier said than done -- and Deb has done both quite beautifully in this book.
Debs first novel is an eye opener; the type of book that changes the way one looks at his/her surroundings, as well as reflect at his/her roots. A true classic of the 21st century. His writing immerses us in a dark, rainy and cold world where life exists among the puddles. The characters as well as the atmosphere seem to flow from the pages and form around us naturally, without rough descriptions or departures from the story. Everything is seamlessly intergrated into the flow of the life within the novel. The story instantly picks up and throws us into an unfamiliar world, yet one that is easily imaginable. With Deb at the lead, the trip seems to follow a thread through time; a mystery of where he is taking us, as well as who is taking us there. Anticipation mounts as details drip from the pages like slowly brewing coffee. The story really shines in his expression of humanity; characters are real and their thoughts and emotions can be felt althought not written. This book shows how a book can expresses a story without degrading its quality with words. True stories are expressed with emotions, and Deb perfectly expresses these emotions here. " Commercial truckers preferred to sleep through the day and pull out at night in large groups, headlights blinking and swaying against the dark slopes rising towards an equally dark sky, lit up on winter nights with the pinpoints of celestial travellers. " (Deb, 42)