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by Rosina Lippi

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Author: Rosina Lippi
ISBN: 0007105789
Language: English
Pages: 224 pages
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Flamingo (2001)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: lrf azw mobi lit
FB2 size: 1437 kb | EPUB size: 1491 kb | DJVU size: 1692 kb
Sub: Fiction

The author, Rosina Lippi, also writes under the name of Sarah Donati and you can find her page here on Goodreads.

Each life has its place, and every variation ripples the surface of the. The author, Rosina Lippi, also writes under the name of Sarah Donati and you can find her page here on Goodreads. While her books under the alias are good, Homestead is in a class above. Jun 21, 2008 Rilla rated it it was amazing.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Each life has its place, and every variation ripples the surface of the tiny alpine village called Rosenau. Be it a mysteriously misaddressed love letter or a girl's careless delivery of two helpless relatives into Nazi hands.

Rosina Lippi-Green, née Rosina Lippi (born January 14, 1956) is an American writer. She writes under the names Rosina Lippi-Green (linguistics), Rosina Lippi (literary and contemporary fiction), and Sara Donati (historical fiction)

Rosina Lippi-Green, née Rosina Lippi (born January 14, 1956) is an American writer. She writes under the names Rosina Lippi-Green (linguistics), Rosina Lippi (literary and contemporary fiction), and Sara Donati (historical fiction). Lippi-Green was born Rosina Lippi on January 14, 1956, in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Her father was an Italian emigrant, and she has ancestry of different Europeans countries.

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Acclaim for Rosina Lippi’s Homestead Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. The women in this haunting book are deeply and uniquely of their place, yet they speak (often wordlessly) of women’s longings and satisfactions everywhere.

Acclaim for Rosina Lippi’s Homestead Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Very fine and moving. Lippi has a clear eye and a sharp tongue. A novel of great depth, compassion, and tenderness.

It seems a very simple story - 70 years of the lives, loves and hates of the women of the small alpine village of Rosenau - but this book has a grip like a bulldog. Find similar books Profile.

The setting for this poignant novel is Rosenau, an isolated Austrian Village, and the story encompasses generations of villagers and their intimate lives. Be it a mysteriously misaddressed love letter or a girl's careless delivery of two helpless relatives into Nazi hands, the town's balance is ever tested, and ever tender.

My name is Rosina Lippi. I'm a former academic and tenured university professor, writing full time since 2000. Note: Contact Village Books directly if you'd like a signed copy of any of my books. Under the pen name Sara Donati I am the author of the Wilderness series, six historical novels that follow the fortunes of a group of families living in upstate New York from about 1792-1825. If you are in difficulties with a book, try the element of surprise: attack it at an hour when it isn’t expecting it. - . Wells (attributed), Sir Osbert Sitwell. Biography 1. Bibliography 2. Rosina Lippi-Green .

Rosina Lippi, a former linguistics professor, is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning literary novel Homestead, which won the 1999 PEN/Hemingway Award and was shortlisted for the 2001 Orange Prize.

Comments (7)
Antuiserum
This book started strong, but then sagged. First few characters are very well developed and the plot interesting, but as the generations unfold, the new people are not 3D, with a few exceptions. The generations flew by with just a passing reference to the earlier, interesting plot lines. That character you loved, what happened to her? Oh, she died. Unsatisfying.
Ungall
This book did not hold my interest. The story lines were quite bland, boring and dark at times. Jumping around from character to character made the book confusing and a bit irritating to read. I had difficulty empathizing or relating to any of the characters as their stories were told briefly before the author would move on to other characters. I rarely do this, but having read about two thirds of the novel, I just could not bring myself to read anymore. However, I really enjoyed and would highly recommend this author's Wilderness series written under the pen name, Sarah Donati. I am surprised they are written by the same author as the overall styles, plot and character development are vastly different.
Globus
this is an unusual book, honest and straightforward. The community described is isolated in the alps and one could say their life is primitive The characters are very vivid and lifelike which makes the narrative of past into present events seem credible. They live on the barest of essentials and the author makes this seem an acceptable and ordinary way of life. Maybe we all have ancestors who lived like this. An fascinating book with more depth than on first sight
Anyshoun
Since I always enjoy multi-generational sagas, I was most enthusiastic when I first picked up this book. But I'm afraid that I didn't enjoy this title nearly as much as I thought I would.
Lippi's writings, at times, did invoke the spirit and solitude of the isolated Alpine farming village and the women who lived there. And these images and characters did fill the pages of the interlocking stories over an 80 year period. While the reader becomes familiar with these women's lives, losses and regrets, all of the stories weren't nearly as spirited or poignant as they could have been.
And for some strange reason, the family trees appeared as endpapers at the back of the book and since I didn't see then till I was almost finished with the book, I felt that having them in the front might have made things less confusing and I also might have enjoyed the book more.
I know that Rosina Lippi spent time in a village similar to the one she wrote about and I am sure this book was factual but I was hoping for stories with a bit more. I have since learned that Rosina Lippi also writes historical fiction under the name of Sara Donati. I now plan on reading one of these books to see if I like them better than this one.
Dagdardana
I read this book because Wendy Welch in her book "Little Bookstore in Big Stone Gap" names it as one of her ten best reads ever.
I enjoyed it, but clearly Wendy and I have different tastes. She names A Prayer for Owen Meany as one of her ten least favorites and I think it's an excellent book that I would read again. I wouldn't read Homestead again, it's too much like short stories and I far prefer novels.
Ishnsius
I forget who recommended this book to me, but I would like to thank her in absentia. Homestead is spectacular. The setting is an isolated Austrian village, and the inter-related stories span several generations of the villagers, exploring their known and secret links and relationships to each other. The history told in Homestead spans the time from early 1900s to almost 1980, and some of the most gut-wrenching and poignant tales concern the nearness of the Nazi threat during WWII. Once met through the pages of this book, the characters and their motives and secrets will stay with you for a long time.
Raelin
I wanted to like it, and give it more stars, but I just can't. The characters weren't interesting, the plot structure left me with a lot of questions, and the few character I wanted to know more about never really had their stories fleshed out. I loved the Wilderness series written under the author's pen name, Sara Donati. Stick with that.
I like Rosina Lippi's writings under her pen-name Sara Donati, so I was eager to read this book. We lived in Austria years ago, and that was another reason I thought I would enjoy this book.

The author writes what amounts to short stories about the lives of 12 different women in a small Austrian village, taking place in the years between 1909 and 1977. She writes about small town gossip and politics, food and social customs and styles of clothing for each of these eras. She also covers the Nazi occupation of Austria during WWII, the poverty the village felt during rationing, and the whole generation of men killed in the war. Several of her characters were the kind that stick in your mind long after you've read the chapter.

What I didn't like about this book is that you never again return to that character to see how things turned out. After the reader has invested in their life story and current situation, the chapter ends and you're on to another woman. I would have much rather "lived" with fewer women for longer periods of their lives and seen how their loves, heartbreaks, talents and friendships turned out.

There were one or two surprises revealed decades later through other family members, but overall I was left feeling like an outsider instead of being absorbed into the village life. This was a good book, but not a great one.