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by Flannery O'Connor

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Author: Flannery O'Connor
ISBN: 0704346966
Language: English
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Contemporary
Publisher: Gardners Books (August 31, 2001)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: mbr lrf doc docx
FB2 size: 1461 kb | EPUB size: 1580 kb | DJVU size: 1917 kb
Sub: Fiction

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964) was one of America’s most gifted writers. She wrote two novels, Wise Blood and The Violent Bear It Away, and two story collections, A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Everything That Rises Must Converge

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964) was one of America’s most gifted writers. She wrote two novels, Wise Blood and The Violent Bear It Away, and two story collections, A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Everything That Rises Must Converge. Her Complete Stories, published posthumously in 1972, won the National Book Award that year, and in a 2009 online poll it was voted as the best book to have won the award in the contest's 60-year history. Her essays were published in Mystery and Manners and her letters in The Habit of Being.

A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories. Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964) was one of America’s most gifted writers.

Though Flannery O'Connor is somewhat sparing with her descriptions, the characterization of the grandmother and her family is excellent.

The grandmother was pushing to go to Tennessee instead, for lots of reasons - she has friends there; an escaped criminal called The Misfit is running around loose in Florida - but she gets overruled. Though Flannery O'Connor is somewhat sparing with her descriptions, the characterization of the grandmother and her family is excellent. O'Connor has a great eye for human foibles.

A Good Man Is Hard to Find" is a short story written by Flannery O'Connor in 1953. The story appears in the collection of short stories of the same name. The interpretive work of scholars often focuses on the controversial final scene. The story was first published in 1953 in the anthology The Avon Book of Modern Writing. In 1960, it was collected in the anthology The House of Fiction, published by Charles Scribner's Sons.

Inspiration for Readers and Writers from Classic Women Authors. A brief analysis of A Good Man is Hard to Find. I knew very little about Flannery O’Connor when this collection of short stories was recommended to me. This analysis was contributed by Jillian McKeown, excerpted from Feminist Short Stories: Horror & SCi-Fi (Part 1): I knew very little about Flannery O’Connor when this collection of short stories was recommended to me. I knew that O’Connor was Irish Catholic, and that the stories were written in the mid-20th century.

A good man is hard to find," Red Sammy said. Everything is getting terrible.

Because you're a good man!" the grandmother said at once. Yes'm, I suppose so," Red Sam said as if he were struck with this answer. A good man is hard to find," Red Sammy said. I remember the day you could go off and leave your screen door unlatched.

Type of story that A Good Man is Hard to Find i.

Type of story that A Good Man is Hard to Find is. Southern Gothic. A Good Man is Hard to Find. About a family who decide to vacation down to Florida from Georgia. Try's to talk The Misfit into sparing her life as she knows he's a good man. The Misfit puts on her son's shirt after he has the son killed then she takes her figurative talk regarding his goodness to heart and trys to touch The Misfit. The Misfit shoots her when she trys to touch him on the shoulder near the end of the story. The "Misfit" said grandmother would have been a good woman if there had been someone to her every minute of her life? cat. Who did the "Misfit" leave alive?

O'Connor herself singled it out by making it the title piece of her first collection and the . Another amazing collection from Flannery O'Connor. A Good Man is Hard to Find" Women Writers : Text and Contexts Women writers Women writers.

O'Connor herself singled it out by making it the title piece of her first collection and the story she most often chose for readings or talks to students. It is an unforgettable tale, both riveting and comic, of the confrontation of a family with violence and sudden death. Test and contexts, Text and contexts.

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964) was born in Savannah, Georgia, the only child of Catholic parents. She was a good amateur painter. Her Complete Stories was awarded the Best of the National Book Awards by America's National Book Foundation in 2009. Библиографические данные. In 1945 she enrolled at the Georgia State College for Women. After earning her degree she continued her studies on the University of Iowa's writing program, and her first published story, 'The Geranium', was written while she was still a student. Her writing is best known for its explorations of religious themes and southern racial issues, and for combining the comic with the tragic.

Comments (7)
Hugighma
I could go on and on about why I think Flannery O'Connor's short story collection, A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories, is an almost perfect example of a Southern Gothic literary work -- but I won't. Suffice it to say, I wholeheartedly recommend this book of stories to anyone who loves complex and richly drawn characters speaking (oftentimes) colorful, lively language against a dark, Southern backdrop.
What the majority of these stories have in common are the classic Southern Gothic themes: grotesque characters, religious themes, some ironic, unusual event. O'Connor is just a master at tying these themes together into a great story.

I highly recommend this book.
Makaitist
A Good Man is Hard to Find is the first short story collection by Flannery O’Conner. O’Conner became known for her literary contribution to the Southern Gothic genre, and her unusual brand of Christian allegory that incorporated a predominance of “grotesque” characters. A major theme throughout the majority of the works in this collection focus on redemption and the achievement of religious or spiritual “grace” through hardship and violence. The majority of O’Conner’s characters are portrayed as both morally and physically ugly, and very few – if any – are shown in a positive light. This is especially true of women and children, who tend to fare the worst in O’Conner’s fiction. O’Conner does not typically provide characters for the reader to empathize with or “root for,” as her main focus is illustrating the spiritual failings of individuals (and sometimes society as a whole) through the open display of these severe character flaws, often personifying them externally as physical defects (ugliness) or abnormalities (missing limbs).

The collection gets its name from the first short story, and it is easy to see why it was chosen to represent (in name) this body of work. A Good Man is Hard to Find is easily one of the collection’s strongest works, following a grandmother and her family’s run-in with an escaped convict self-dubbed The Misfit. The brutality of the story’s gradual conclusion is emotionally jarring (despite its understated delivery) and threatens to stay with the reader permanently. Other stories in the collection that match the intensity and/or excellence of this piece include The River, about a neglected child’s encounter with religion, as well as The Life You Save May Be Your Own and Good Country People, both of which feature missing limbs, traveling con artists, the potential of redemption. Good Country People also includes the fall of a self-proclaimed intellectual, another of O’Conner’s favorite targets.

The weakest work of the collection is easily A Temple of the Holy Ghost, which – much like the title itself – abandons O’Conner’s normal allegorical subtext early on and instead launches into bald-faced proselytizing, eschewing the more calculated symbolism and metaphor for which O’Conner is well more known. The Artificial *title omitted because of Amazon’s automatic filters* is almost guilty of the same, as the narrator goes to great lengths to explain the spiritual transformation of the characters at the end, but overall it isn’t enough to ruin the story of a Grandfather and Grandson’s eventful trip into “the city.”

A stroke of Good Fortune, A Circle in the Fire, and A Late Encounter with the Enemy, while not at the best of the bunch, are still solid entries that easily display O’Conner’s literary talents, and support her ongoing theme of grotesque characters, while exploring subject matter slightly removed from spiritual grace, including the arrogance of the individual’s perceived control over body (A Stroke of Good Fortune), personal history (A Late Encounter with the Enemy),, nature, and even other people (A Circle in the Fire).

Personally, the piece in O’Conner’s collection that I struggled the most with is The Displaced Person. It is an impressive short story in three parts that tackles a multitude of subjects, among them racism, xenophobia, morality, patriotism, control, pride, sloth, and yes, redemption. The story follows a widowed farm owner who takes in an immigrant family from Poland as a working tenant at the bequest of a local priest. All of O’Connor’s trademark elements are present, with all of the major characters driven by character flaws that prevent them from seeing the hypocrisy or illogic in their decision making and world view. However, O’Conner’s handling of the immigrant farm hand, Mr. Guizac, is enough of a departure from O’Conner’s norm to - at the very least – raise some questions. Throughout the other works in this collection, there are rarely any true “innocents” on hand, and even those few characters that could be perceived as innocent, such as young Harry Ashfield in The River, still display character flaws as well as a need or desire for redemption. Mr. Gulzac, however, is never demonstrated to have any outward corruption or deficiencies. Any “flaws” ascribed to Mr. Gulzac are done so through the biased filters of the other characters, and are obviously done so erroneously out of xenophobia, jealousy, fear, or false morality. This is at least partly due to the fact that, unlike the vast majority of major characters in O’Conner’s stories, the narrator never describes any of Mr. Gulzac’s actions from his point of view. Practically all other characters are given at least a brief POV by the narrator, or at the very least have some personal backstory presented as context, but Mr. Gulzac’s own perspective is never truly presented by the narrator. Whenever we see Mr. Gulzac, it is through the eyes of another character, or through the straight-forward impersonal descriptions of the narrator. It is almost as if O’Connor (intentionally or otherwise) makes the geographically displaced Mr. Gulzac a displaced entity in the story, somehow not even belonging in the narrative itself. This emotional distance from the reader mirrors the distance that separates him from other characters, but without the warped prism of bias and prejudice that O’Conner’s other characters exhibit, this distance lends Mr. Gulzac a perception of innocence by omission; other characters reveal their flawed logic and morality through the narrator, but all we are shown of Mr. Gulzac is the hard work and competency that draws the ire and envy of others.

This distance from Mr. Gulzac in the story highlights my other problem with The Displaced Person, the story’s ending. O’Conner’s other stories tend to end after the climactic or transformative action occurs, with the redemption or ultimate results left open and undetermined (The River might be the only other exception to this, depending on your own interpretation). The Displaced Person, however, takes the reader beyond the tragic climax of the ending and offers an uncharacteristic denouement that delivers a level of closure. It almost feels as if O’Connor feels compelled to offer up some semblance of justice – a rarity in the O’Connor universe – for the treatment of that rarest of all O’Connor character, the innocent.

Of course, these are not major faults in The Displaced Man as they are perceived variations of the collected works, and with the possible exception of A Temple of the Holy Ghost, every story in this collection is powerful enough to stand on its own. If you are unfamiliar with the Southern Gothic genre, this collection of stories is an excellent place to start.
Anardred
I ordered the Kindle version and did not notice errors. This short-story collection is nothing short of a masterpiece. I was shocked but not disappointed. I am impressed by O'Connor's keen insight, sharp wit, and boldness. I can guarantee you won't like the characters in the stories, but O'Connor's irony is gripping. If you can't stomach very flawed and unlikable characters or victimization, then this is not the book for you. This book is not ideal bedtime reading, but it is worth a read.
Faebei
If you are a fan of Flannery O'Connor then you know what you're in for. If you've never read her works then hold on... it's a different kind of ride.

Some of what you read will have you laughing out loud... and hard! But every story will have a dark, if not disturbing, twist. The grandmother in "A Good Man is Hard to Find" reminded me quite a bit of my own grandmother in that she was prim, proper, and yet manipulative as hell... in a very funny way. And the darker characters were, at first, like any ol' redneck you might run into in the old, deep south. But then the darkness sets in... and man, it leaves you shocked and silent.

Don't read unless you want to be slightly depressed. Good cerebral read that I do occasionally enjoy.