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by Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch,Fernanda Savage

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Author: Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch,Fernanda Savage
ISBN: 1420934252
Language: English
Pages: 80 pages
Category: Classics
Publisher: Digireads.com (January 1, 2009)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: doc lrf docx txt
FB2 size: 1610 kb | EPUB size: 1241 kb | DJVU size: 1923 kb
Sub: Fiction

Author: Ritter von Leopold Sacher-Masoch. Translator: Fernanda Savage. Leopold von sacher-masoch. Translated from the German.

Author: Ritter von Leopold Sacher-Masoch. Of this book, intended for private circulation, only 1225 copies have been printed, and type afterward distributed. By. But the Almighty Lord hath struck him, and hath delivered him into the hands of a woman. -The Vulgate, Judith, xvi.

Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch's 'Venus In Furs', is interesting though eccentric, and .

Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch's 'Venus In Furs', is interesting though eccentric, and perverse though compelling. Besieged in wonder and suspense, the love affair between characters: Severin von Kusiemski and Wanda von Dunajew, becomes a roller coaster ride of desire and emotion. The obsessive fantasy to be enslaved and brutalized by the woman he loves becomes a cruel reality for poor old Severin. Considering that Sacher-Masoch's name ended up being a synonym for an entire branch of sexuality, I was disappointed to discover that Venus in Furs is not a story about a masochistic relationship (except in a more dysfunctional meaning of the word).

LEOPOLD VON SACHER-MASOCH was born in 1836 in Lemberg (today Lvov), in the province of Habsburg Galicia. His father was the police prefect of the city, and the family moved, within the Habsburg monarchy, to Prague in 1848 and to Graz in 1854. When Sacher-Masoch died in 1895, his works of fiction, and especially Venus in Furs, were already widely recognized as giving literary expression to a not uncommon, but previously little discussed, complex of romantic and sexual fantasies. LARRY WOLFF is professor of European history at Boston College.

Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (27 January 1836 – 9 March 1895) was an Austrian nobleman, writer and journalist, who gained renown for his romantic stories of Galician life. The term masochism is derived from his name, invented by his contemporary, the Austrian psychiatrist Richard von Krafft-Ebing. Masoch did not approve of this use of his name

Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch apparently drew from his own masochistic experience with Baroness Fanny Von Pistor. Venus in Furs undoubtedly ranks in the top ten books of the nineteenth-century for advancing new ideas about sexual practice

Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch apparently drew from his own masochistic experience with Baroness Fanny Von Pistor. He agreed to be her slave, and renounce all claim on his own life (she could even kill him if she wished), and this is reflected in Venus in Furs. Venus in Furs undoubtedly ranks in the top ten books of the nineteenth-century for advancing new ideas about sexual practice. The famous sexologist Kraft-Ebbing is deeply indebted to Sacher-Masoch, as one sees in the monumental Psychopathia sexualis (1886). The work carries interesting implications for the student of law in literature.

by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch. Translated by Fernanda Savage. Venus im Pelz was published in German in 1870. Sacher-Masoch’s works have held an established position in European letters for something like half a century, and the author himself was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honor by the French Government in 1883, on the occasion of his literary jubilee. When several years ago cheap reprints were brought out on the Continent and attempts were made by various guardians of morality-they exist in all countries-to have them suppressed, the judicial decisions were invariably against the plaintiff and in favor of the publisher.

Leopold von Sacher Masoch was born in Lemberg, Austrian Galicia, on January 27, 1836. He studied jurisprudence at Prague and Graz, and in 1857 became a teacher at the latter university. He published several historical works, but soon gave up his academic career to devote himself wholly to literature. His last years he spent at Lindheim in Hesse, Germany, where he died on March 9, 1895.

by Fernanda Savage and Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch 2 June 1870. True Decadence: Leopold von Sacher-Masoch's Venus in Furs Accompanied by Selected Works of Franz von Bayros. Usually ships within 4 to 5 days. by Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch 14 June 2012. by Leopold Von Sacher-Mashoch and Franz Von Bayros 15 November 2007. by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch 1 December 1997. Mass Market Paperback.

by. dominance, sadomasochism. Folkscanomy: A Library of Books. Additional Collections. Uploaded by Adult-Books on November 11, 2017.

First published in 1870, this novella has since become the best-known of Sacher-Masoch's works. This Austrian author imagined an epic series entitled the 'Legacy of Cain,' and "Venus in Furs" has become the most famous of the first volume. The nested narrative begins with a nameless narrator who dreams of speaking to the goddess Venus about love as she wears furs. When he confides these dreams to his friend Severin, a young Galacian nobleman, however, he is given a manuscript to read that will reveal the terrible secret of Severin. As the tale unfolds, Severin's desire for a ruthless woman to love is personified by Wanda, a beautiful and affluent widow who fulfills Severin's darkest wishes. So skilled is she at domination, however, that Severin is soon powerless to escape his cruel lover's clutches and degrading schemes. When reality and fantasy intermingle in this subtle, erotic classic, the result is the original definition and a masterful acknowledgement of the sexual inclination for masochism, now eponymous with Sacher-Masoch.
Comments (7)
Qumenalu
The word "masochism" was taken from the name of this author and this is the book which first described this aspect of human nature. In the 19th century tradition, this novella is a frame story containing a first person account. It's a novella and so it's a quick read. Severin, the protagonist falls in love with a woman and convinces her to treat him as her love slave. Much of the interest is in the dialogue between Severin and the object of his desire, Wanda. The story remains quite insightful and honest about human attraction to bondage and submission.
Jwalextell
I found this book to be a real eye opener for me.I can relate to the protagonist dilemma. To love a woman so completely and have your words and actions fall away as if you didn't exist is a shame. I liked reading this book and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in the human psyche when it involves the emotion of love.
Golden Lama
Boring....the same theme is repeated over and over.
DireRaven
A well thought out erotic tale.
Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch's 'Venus In Furs', is interesting though eccentric, and perverse though compelling. Besieged in wonder and suspense, the love affair between characters: Severin von Kusiemski and Wanda von Dunajew, becomes a roller coaster ride of desire and emotion.
The obsessive fantasy to be enslaved and brutalized by the woman he loves becomes a cruel reality for poor old Severin. As beautiful Wanda slowly becomes thrilled and captivated by the notion of fulfilling her role in his fantasy, a role that previously made her shrug and laugh, she eventually transforms herself into the controlling dominatrix of Severin's dreams--by becoming more ideal at the sadomasochistic lifestyle than he had ever dreamed was possible. As Severin becomes the ever so content and happy slave, this tug-of-war between self-esteem and power begins to twist and turn with the innocent and deadly psychological games played out between the two.
Written more than a hundred years ago, this psychodrama of love, bound by the perverted desires of one and the demon lying dormant within the other, was tastefully and artfully done.
Kinashand
Masochism, as expressed and experienced in today's world either vicariously or sensuously renders this book bland. The tone is salacious but overly wordy. Not in the least Passionate, Provocative, OR Primal.
Kendis
I wanted to read this book for years, and when it finally crossed my radar here at Amazon, I snapped it up with very high expectations. However, my reading experience was very different from my expectations of it.

Considering that Sacher-Masoch's name ended up being a synonym for an entire branch of sexuality, I was disappointed to discover that Venus in Furs is *not* a story about a masochistic relationship (except in a more dysfunctional meaning of the word).

While the main characters do enjoy some aspects of masochism/sadism, they mainly use it as a weapon against each other in an intense gender power struggle. People in the fetish community will recognize the term "topping from the bottom", (and others will be more familiar with "passive-aggressive"), where the submissive/masochistic partner tries to use his/her "sacrifice" to gain covert control over the relationship and the dominant partner, while avoiding actually taking responsibility for what happens. If you're looking for a genuine story about the sadistic/masochistic aspect of human sexuality, you will be disappointed by Venus in Furs.

On the other hand, this book is an intense historical document about the Western view of gender and relationships a hundred years ago, which is still very much present in today's Western countries. It's fascinating, funny, sad and horrifying at the same time, to be for a while steeped into an idea of the world in which relationships are a brute power struggle in which one side must always lose, and the only way a person can hope to keep both his/her self and his/her beloved is to "win" by deception, intimidation, domination, violence and mind-games. It's a story about wounded, neurotic, fearful and repressed love in a culture which applied Nitsche and Darwin very literally and simplistically to every aspect of human life.
Manemanu
Leopold von Sacher-Masoch is the root for the term masochism and he portrays this in his novel 'Venus in Furs' by depicting the personal discovery of a young man whose relationship takes a turn when he realizes he wants to stay with his "venus" no matter the consequences. This devolves into his own urge to be treated badly by his lover, and results in his ultimately getting exactly what he wished for.

Told from the point of view of the man when he is older, he tells the story to another young man as a lesson to avoid suffering the pains he has suffered. Told with fascinating language and imagery, it is a book that offers an understanding of the source of the term "masochism" and provides a nice short story in and of itself.
I can see how this book may have been shocking to Victorian sensibilities and to the prudish now, but I felt the importance of this work in the world of erotica is exaggerated. The emotional experience of submission is well explored in this book, and, from the author's name comes 'masochism', but I feel like it all could have been opened even more. Maybe I feel less than satisfied with this book due to the standards of modern morality and entertainment. This book is tame compared to what you can see on cable television, without even paying for the premium channels. The main character's experience with submission is compelling, but at times, you wish the author had been more explicit about the nature of the character's suffering. More particular about the emotional and physical suffering caused by the Venus in Furs. It seems that being more precise would have driven home the ideas on submission, domination and whether they can destroy love much more strongly.