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by Wilbur Smith

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Author: Wilbur Smith
ISBN: 0330370847
Language: English
Pages: 624 pages
Category: Action & Adventure
Publisher: Pan Books; Unabridged edition edition (November 20, 1998)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: lrf lrf rtf doc
FB2 size: 1841 kb | EPUB size: 1916 kb | DJVU size: 1879 kb
Sub: Fiction

Book 12 in the Standalone Books. A sample from The Sunbird. It cut across the darkened projection room and exploded silently against the screen – and I did not recognize it.

Book 12 in the Standalone Books. READ NOW. I had waited fifteen years for it, and when it came I did not recognize it.

The Sunbird is a 1972 novel by Wilbur Smith about an archeological dig. The novel was a favourite of Smith's, who claimed it was heavily influenced by H. Rider Haggard

The Sunbird is a 1972 novel by Wilbur Smith about an archeological dig. Rider Haggard. Smith: It was a very important book for me in my development as a writer because at that stage I was starting to become enchanted by the lure of Hollywood

In Wilbur Smith's The Sunbird, Dr. Ben Kazin is a brilliant archeologist. I loved this book I love the atmosphere that wilbur smith creates in his books and this was no exseption would read again does have a few swear words and sex scenes.

In Wilbur Smith's The Sunbird, Dr.

Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Wilbur Smith Series: Ballantyne. Welcome to Gray City. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

His other books include Those in Peril, River God, Warlock, The Seventh Scroll, and The Sunbird.

His bestselling Courtney series includes Assegai, The Sound of Thunder, Birds of Prey, Monsoon, and Blue Horizon. His other books include Those in Peril, River God, Warlock, The Seventh Scroll, and The Sunbird. Smith was born to a British family in Northern Rhodesia, now Zambia, in Central Africa, and attended Rhodes University in South Africa.

Wilbur Smith is the bestselling author of many novels, each meticulously . I first read the condensed version on the Sunbird in Reader's Digest many years ago. I was so enthralled with it that I bought the book as soon as I could. His other books include Those in Peril, River God, Warlock, and The Seventh Scroll. From time to time I go back and read it again, it's that special to me.

Category: Fiction Adventure. Published in the United States by Ballantine Books, a division of Random House, Inc. New York. Originally published in Great Britain by William Heinemann Ltd. in. ISBN 0-449-14825-4.

What else?''Hell, Ben. I've explained it before. That's not the important thing. It's not money, it's exports and employment, and opening up new resources, and building for the future, realizing the. You are too shrewd, Ben. I suppose that's a lot of it. The game, not the score. 'Have you seen last week's Time magazine?'.

Wilbur Smith, the world’s greatest storyteller, once again recreates all the drama, uncertainty, and courage of a bygone era in this thrilling saga of the sea.

The New York Times bestselling author of Desert God and Pharaoh adds another chapter to his popular historical saga featuring the seafaring Tom Courtney, the hero of Monsoon and Blue Horizon, with this magnificent swashbuckling saga set in the eighteenth century and packed with action, violence, romance, and rousing adventure. Wilbur Smith, the world’s greatest storyteller, once again recreates all the drama, uncertainty, and courage of a bygone era in this thrilling saga of the sea. Actions & Adventure, Thrillers & Crime.

A photograph and a curse are the only clues Dr Ben Kazin has before he stumbles on the archaeological discovery. Beneath the red cliffs of Botswanaland a civilization has remained buried for millennia. But the magic of uncovering a lost culture is interrupted by the violence of terrorists, love, intrigue and the secrets of centuries.
Comments (7)
Frostdefender
I have read a number of Wilbur Smith novels over the years and for the most part I have found the adventures exciting and hard to put down. I first read the condensed version on the Sunbird in Reader's Digest many years ago. I was so enthralled with it that I bought the book as soon as I could. From time to time I go back and read it again, it's that special to me. Now you are wondering why I would buy it on my Kindle? I was going on a trip and I did not want to take a big book along, the Kindle is the perfect way to travel and read.
The story is so intriguing it is hard to describe. The author writes about his favorite subject, African history. There is a wonderfully complex main character, romance, betrayal and then you are taken back in time. It's not exactly a time travel story in the usual sense, but I don't want to give too much away. This is a story that I look forward to reading again, I never get tired of it. As soon as I start to read it, I get lost it it again. That's the best endorsement I can give.
After reading some of the reviews, I find that I must comment on the few negative reviews. Stop being so Politically Correct. This is a made up story, it entertains and asks viable questions. Not all whites are perfect and not all blacks are perfect. The characters that he made up are intriguing and the story can carry you along with it if you don't have your own political bias. Lighten up, we all have to accept flaws in ourselves. I have to wonder if some of the negative reviewers even read the book because of their ill-informed comments.
Dolid
Edit note: The Kindle version is just appalling. Definitely the worst Kindle book I've seen. At times I couldn't figure out what was meant due to the extensive and frequent errors.
====================
"The Sunbird" is imaginative, robustly plotted, and has well-developed characters in exotic locales, with fast-paced action, and an interesting reworking of ancient history make this a terrific read if you can overlook the paternalistic "great white man" tone of the first half of the novel. African wildlife gets a pretty hard time of it as well what with all the great white hunters taking pot shots at them in the first half and the unlimited slaughter in the second half.

The first half of the book is really an elaborate set-up for the second half of the novel which packs an authentic emotive tale of friendship, love, war, and betrayal. The second half is set in an imagined Punic colony which considers itself civilized although it is wantonly cruel. It is a civilization that should not continue, yet the author makes it sympathetic through the focus on close relationships among the protagonists, each of whom mirror the protagonists in the 1972 world of the first half of the book.

The setting is somewhere in Botswana in the region of the Zambezi river in Africa of today, (1972 at time of original publication), and also as it might have been between the fall of Catharge, (146 BCE), to somewhere in the mid-5th century. There is a clever mirroring of ancient and modern characters that helps create suspense.

The Kindle version seems to have been scanned without benefit of correction. The price is the same as the paperback version (which is actually more expensive than the hardback) but at least the paperback does not contain thousands of typological errors. Often you have to figure out what is meant from context because the errors can be extensive. Apparently not even a basic spell check was run on this text after it was scanned. It is a pity that Amazon does not have some kind of quality control over text that it sells for its Kindle.
Bys
Read this (and many other Wilbur Smith books) several years ago and always regretted giving away the copy we had. Wilbur Smith is a prolific writer covering diverse subject matter but almost all are centered in/around South African locales. His books make the African continent come alive in your mind's eye but they can be violent and this one isn't an exception. There are many reviews here that have story/plots details and so you can determine your interest in this particular novel. My review is more about Wilbur Smith and his body of work. For action, adventure, exotic locations, love and even hate... he is an author that you should not overlook.
Zovaithug
I've read some of his other books and they are usually very good. This one? Not so much. I'm not fond of first-person narrations and would have passed on it completely had I checked it out further before purchasing it. It seems more like two books and the leap from one to the other seems vague and confusing for why. It drags on and on.
.
There are two time settings. The 'now' one is okay, but the second setting was supposed to be more than a thousand years ago and in Africa. The author writes about corn being planted or fed to animals during this setting. Corn is an export from the Americas and only in the last few hundred years did the plant make it to Africa. Now it is a common and widely used crop, but not then. This error brings you out of the story. Somebody didn't check their facts - both the author and the publisher.
Malarad
Another very good story by Wilbur Smith. A book with parallel story lines, yet set 1200 years apart in southern Africa. A mystical edge with karma and reincarnation broadly hinted at. Good character development with plenty of excitement, frustrated romance, and bonds of enduring male friendship. Did the Phoenicians build a lost civilization in what is now Zimbabwe? Circumstantial evidence points to the possibility but in Smith's fictional account it is all proven to be very real.
Voodoolkree
Very very much enjoyed this work! I have no idea why others indicate the first half of the book is in any way inferior to the last half ... what? Not enough gore? That's perhaps the only difference in quality.

Also, I just read the Kindle version and it is FLAWLESS. So either it's been fixed, or the one who previously whined so loudly about it isn't a very skilled reader. Will leave it to you to guess.

I'll give no summary here, others have done that well. The story is awesome, the pace - perfect. Read it in two days, without too many breaks. Now among my favorites, and I've read quite a few.