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by Randy Wayne White

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Author: Randy Wayne White
ISBN: 0399158499
Language: English
Pages: 317 pages
Category: Action & Adventure
Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons; 1st edition (September 4, 2012)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: txt rtf lrf azw
FB2 size: 1790 kb | EPUB size: 1427 kb | DJVU size: 1666 kb
Sub: Fiction

Like many of White's readers, I took up with White's Hannah Smith series because waiting on a new Ford adventure is tough, even with the subtle changes White has made to his character over the last couple of years. While I'm moved by other writer's criticism that Randy should just write two Marion Ford novels a year rather than do one of each, I don't blame him for wanting a little variety. This is my first of the Hannah Smith books. I'll read the others. Here's a couple of observations about this first one

Also by Randy Wayne White Doc Ford Sanibel Flats The Heat Islands The Man Who Invented Florida Captiva North of Havana The Mangrove . Randy Wayne White’s Ultimate Tarpon Book. Batfishing in the Rainforest. The Sharks of Lake Nicaragua.

Also by Randy Wayne White Doc Ford Sanibel Flats The Heat Islands The Man Who Invented Florida Captiva North of Havana The Mangrove Coast Ten Thousand Islands.

Randy Wayne White (born 1950) is an American writer of crime fiction and non-fiction adventure tales. He has written New York Times best-selling novels and has received awards for his fiction and a television documentary

Randy Wayne White (born 1950) is an American writer of crime fiction and non-fiction adventure tales. He has written New York Times best-selling novels and has received awards for his fiction and a television documentary. He is best known for his series of crime novels featuring the retired NSA agent Doc Ford, a marine biologist living on the Gulf Coast of southern Florida. White has contributed material on a variety of topics to numerous magazines and has lectured across the United States.

The first book in the Hannah Smith series, 2012. The Ox Woman (Sarah McLain Smith) had blue eyes and wore her hair in a bun at the back of her neck, as did many women at that time. For Georgia Wilson White, and the iron-willed Wilson sisters of Rockingham, . Johnsie, JoAnn, Judy, Della Sue, Vera, Authorena, and my dear Aunt Jewel. She was always polite and well-spoken, behaved as a lady, and was grateful for anything that was done for her. There was no record of her ever having misused her great strength to injure anyone, or do harm.

Randy Wayne White is the author of twenty-four previous Doc Ford novels; the Hannah Smith novels Gone and Deceived; and four collections of nonfiction. Biography rlene Brennan) and a PBS documentary, Gift of the Game, which won Best of Show at the internationally respected Woods Hole Film Festival.

Randy Wayne White - Haunted (A Hannah Smith Novel). Gone (A Hannah Smith Novel Book ○ "Randy Wayne White introduces Hannah Smith-a lady with the heart and courage to take on the world. Murder, sunken treasure, and pirates both ancient and modern send Doc Ford on a nightmare quest in this New York Times bestseller in Randy Wayne White's. Hannah Smith: a tall, strong, formidable Florida woman, the descendant of generations of strong Florida women. Gone - Book Detail - St. Book discussion at the Bloomingdale Regional Library October 2014 at PM. This book discussion is facilitated by the Whodonit Book Club.

Hannah Smith returns in the stunning new adventure in the New York Times–bestselling series by the author of the Doc Ford novels. A fishing guide and part-time investigator, Hannah Smith is a tall, strong Florida woman descended from many generations of the same. and the Rutledge family is gathering for breakfast, unaware of the two bombs that have been planted outside their home. They're about to start eating when a fireball bursts through the windows, and the house is blasted to dust, leaving only one survivor.

Author White, Randy Wayne. Books by White, Randy Wayne: Deceived (A Hannah Smith Novel). 10 10. 10. Doc Ford 19 - Chasing Midnight.

New York Times bestselling author Randy Wayne White introduces Hannah Smith-a lady with the heart and courage to take on the worl. annah Smith is a tall, strong, formidable Florida woman, the descendant of generations of strong Florida women

New York Times bestselling author Randy Wayne White introduces Hannah Smith-a lady with the heart and courage to take on the worl. annah Smith is a tall, strong, formidable Florida woman, the descendant of generations of strong Florida women. She makes her living as a fishing guide, but her friends, neighbors, and clients also know her as an uncommonly resourceful woman with a keen sense of justice, as someone who can’t be bullied-and they have taken to coming to her with their problems.

Randy Wayne White has long been known for suspenseful plots, complex characters, and an extraordinary sense of place. His new series has them all—and then some. Hannah Smith: a tall, strong, formidable Florida woman, the descendant of generations of strong Florida women. She makes her living as a fishing guide, but her friends, neighbors, and clients also know her as an uncommonly resourceful woman with a keen sense of justice—someone who can’t be bullied—and they have taken to coming to her with their problems.Her methods can be unorthodox, though, and those on the receiving end of them often wind up very unhappy—and sometimes very violent. And when a girl goes missing, and Hannah is asked to find her, that is exactly what happens. . . .
Comments (7)
Tane
Randy Wayne White is my guy. If it wasn't for his fiction--the first few devoured while staying at a house on his beloved island, Sanibel--I probably wouldn't be writing fiction as well. Him and Don Pendleton actually, because White stands on Pendleton's shoulders. Pendleton is arguably the inventor of the men's action fiction genre. But I Iike White best because he does place-based fiction like few others. Put him in fellow Florida writer Carl Hiaasen's box, though there are occasions I enjoy Hiaasen more. And thankfully, because I've read all that both authors have written, there are still others...

Like many of White's readers, I took up with White's Hannah Smith series because waiting on a new Ford adventure is tough, even with the subtle changes White has made to his character over the last couple of years. While I'm moved by other writer's criticism that Randy should just write two Marion Ford novels a year rather than do one of each, I don't blame him for wanting a little variety.

This is my first of the Hannah Smith books. I'll read the others. Here's a couple of observations about this first one:

1) The steady hand of the Florida-based adventure writer is clearly present, beginning and end, though at times I wondered if the book, or parts of it, were being written by others. Especially when the writer is applying tone and details about the women he's writing about. By the end of the book however, I concluded White's hand was there. So maybe the generalizations about women--some of them quite common, many of them male--are the result of a first book in the series. Still, I wonder...

2) I enjoyed the usual technical knowledge White brings to his efforts. This time, I learned a little more about geography I was already familiar with. I liked hearing what it was like to be a fishing guide, about the archeology of the area (something he's written about in his other books). I believe his observations about money on Sanibel Island--some of it old, some of it new--was spot on. There's a reason, you know, that there's a car charge for that bridge from Fort Meyers to Sanibel. It's to keep the riff raff out.

3) The plot, pace, twists and turns deserve mention as well. They show the hand of a master writer in the genre. And they are one of the reasons I continue to read him.

All in all, my thanks again, Randy. You kept me entertained. You didn't fill my mind with nonsense about towns and characters that don't exist, and you deepened my understanding of those that do. Atta boy...
Heri
From the beginning I wondered if Randy Wayne White actually wrote this book. It was hard for me to connect with Hannah. The first several chapters were slow, actually not picking up until the last 100 pages. Hannah lacks a strong personality - not presenting as a whole person. She seems to walk a tightrope as presenting as to being strong then to unsure and selfless. The male characters were better expressed, which was a clue to the authorship. To say I am disappointed in the book is not entirely true but Hannah could have been better characterized if she is who the novel revolves around.

From reading previous reviews of the work, I have to agree with the "one star" renderings. This novel is not up to par. I thought RWW had grown through the years of authoring novels but this works sinks to a new low. Too much meandering, backtracking, leaving essential scenes out. The hows and whys of what happens leaves a sour taste.
Gavinranara
The plot was good; characters were interesting; ending very exciting; but I got so weary of the characters' constant reference to some kind of sex. I am not opposed to some sex but I felt it was thrown into this book because the author must think we want this sort of thing. I read a book for its mystery and action and strong story. If I wanted erotica, that's what I'd read. This is the 2nd book I've read by this author but I don't think I'll go for 3. There are too many other authors out there who write great stuff that I like much better.
Nagor
These sorts novels rest a lot on believable characters. The problem with Florida novels is that real living characters in Florida often eclipse any fictional characters for stupidity, corruption and evil intent. This is the state that attracts serial killers, Koran burning ministers, scammers and con artists, and whose main reputation in other states for monumental zaniness. Here Randy Wayne White has created a sane grounded, and admirable character. Most importantly he doesn't make her a superwomen, kung fu warrior. She's brave and tough and smart, but she makes mistakes in a dangerous situation that are both human and suspenseful. The sort that anyone placed in a highly stressful situation would make. My complaint about a lot of writers in this genre is their characters are too masterful and unbelievable and you can lose interest in them easily. The second part that I liked about this is its a tightly plotted "little" story that deals with evil and takes us on a little journey through west florida and the thousand islands. And that too makes it very readable. The challenge for Randy White is that of a male trying to write in the first person about a female. I think it's extremely difficult to do. And I think the author does a good job of this. But not quite. Which is why I gave it 4 stars rather than five. It could be that as a fan I could not forget the male Doc of his other novels, and I had the odd sensation of the marine biologist sort of springing out in drag sometimes. I'm pretty much convinced though that this is more my fault than the authors. If you are a fan read this one.It's even better if you are new to his fiction. It's great, and a new start, for White. I think Hanna, as a fishing guide, and cracker descendent, will be able to go places that the good Doctor can't quite find.
Bele
Randy White has captured my imagination again. Southwest Florida from my favorite swanky Naples to the wilderness of the Ten Thousand Islands where the Everglades joins Florida Bay. A rugged area as harsh as any environment on earth. A person can find themselves GONE before they realize what trouble they're in! This novel truly was hard to, put down.