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by Ernest Cline

Download Ready Player One fb2
Author: Ernest Cline
ISBN: 030788743X
Language: English
Pages: 384 pages
Category: Humor
Publisher: Crown; 1 edition (August 16, 2011)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: lrf lrf docx azw
FB2 size: 1739 kb | EPUB size: 1534 kb | DJVU size: 1532 kb

Everyone my age remembers where they were and what they were doing when they first heard about the contest.

Everyone my age remembers where they were and what they were doing when they first heard about the contest. I’d heard of Halliday, of course. Everyone had. He was the videogame designer responsible for creating the OASIS, a massively multiplayer online game that had gradually evolved into the globally networked virtual reality most of humanity now used on a daily basis.

Ready Player One is a 2011 science fiction novel, and the debut novel of American author Ernest Cline. Cline sold the rights to publish the novel in June 2010, in a bidding war to the Crown Publishing Group (a division of Random House). The book was published on August 16, 2011

In 2011, Ernest Cline's Ready Player One riveted readers to the page as unlikely hero Wade Watts used his gaming skills and his knowledge of 1980s pop-culture trivia to find clues left by billionaire James Halliday.

In 2011, Ernest Cline's Ready Player One riveted readers to the page as unlikely hero Wade Watts used his gaming skills and his knowledge of 1980s pop-culture trivia to find clues left by billionaire James Halliday. Clues that would lead to control of the Oasis, the online virtual reality platform within which everyone in 21st-century Earth lives the better part of their lives. We asked Cline for his thoughts

Great suffering succotash that is the most fun I have had sitting in a chair since, well it probably would not be politic to discuss that here. I should also say just for the record that by anyone’s . .

Great suffering succotash that is the most fun I have had sitting in a chair since, well it probably would not be politic to discuss that here.efinition I am NOT a geek, which, some could say, is why I really had very little interest in reading this book. All hail familial geeks

Ready Player One book.

Ready Player One book. IN THE YEAR 2044, reality is an ugly place.

ERNEST CLINE is an internationally best-selling novelist, screenwriter, father, and full-time geek. He is the author of the novels Ready Player One and Armada and co-screenwriter of the film adaptation of Ready Player One, directed by Steven Spielberg. His books have been published in over fifty countries and have spent more than 100 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his family, a time-traveling DeLorean, and a large collection of classic video games. Библиографические данные.

I had never heard of Ernest Cline before this book arrived at my door and now I am glad that I have. Ready Player One is an utterly engrossing story, peering nostalgically into a popular past while at the same time set in a disturbing, dystopian, future.

I had never heard of Ernest Cline before this book arrived at my door and now I am glad that I have Ready Player One is an utterly engrossing story, peering nostalgically into a popular past while at the same time set in a disturbing, dystopian, future. But, reader, be warned! If you read this book, you won’t love it - you’ll worship it!

Читать онлайн Ready Player One. Cline Ernest.

Читать онлайн Ready Player One. Because there is no map for where we are going. The Almanac was over a thousand pages long, but it contained few details about Halliday’s personal life or his day-to-day activities.

Ready Player One author and fanboy Ernest Cline - Продолжительность: 4:52 CBS Sunday Morning Recommended for yo.

Ready Player One author and fanboy Ernest Cline - Продолжительность: 4:52 CBS Sunday Morning Recommended for you. 4:52. КОНФЛИКТУЙ ПРАВИЛЬНО: четкая инструкция как для пылесоса) - Продолжительность: 35:12 Евгения Стрелецкая Recommended for you. 35:12. Jordan Peterson on the meaning of life for men.

Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American ReadThe bestselling cult classic—now a major motion picture directed by Steven Spielberg.At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, READY PLAYER ONE is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.It’s the year 2045, and the real world is an ugly place. Like most of humanity, Wade Watts escapes his grim surroundings by spending his waking hours jacked into the OASIS, a sprawling virtual utopia that lets you be anything you want to be, a place where you can live and play and fall in love on any of ten thousand planets. And like most of humanity, Wade dreams of being the one to discover the ultimate lottery ticket that lies concealed within this virtual world. For somewhere inside this giant networked playground, OASIS creator James Halliday has hidden a series of fiendish puzzles that will yield massive fortune—and remarkable power—to whoever can unlock them.   For years, millions have struggled fruitlessly to attain this prize, knowing only that Halliday’s riddles are based in the pop culture he loved—that of the late twentieth century. And for years, millions have found in this quest another means of escape, retreating into happy, obsessive study of Halliday’s icons. Like many of his contemporaries, Wade is as comfortable debating the finer points of John Hughes’s oeuvre, playing Pac-Man, or reciting Devo lyrics as he is scrounging power to run his OASIS rig.And then Wade stumbles upon the first puzzle.Suddenly the whole world is watching, and thousands of competitors join the hunt—among them certain powerful players who are willing to commit very real murder to beat Wade to this prize. Now the only way for Wade to survive and preserve everything he knows is to win. But to do so, he may have to leave behind his oh-so-perfect virtual existence and face up to life—and love—in the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.  A world at stake.A quest for the ultimate prize.Are you ready?

Comments (7)
Barinirm
Thing about writing a novel like this as one's debut effort is that, from here on out, there's nowhere to go but down. To wit, Armada. Ernie Cline's Ready Player One impacted me the same way that Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games did. It's compulsive reading. Cline spins his dystopian quest adventure with supreme vitality and brio and unabashed adoration of all things nerdy. Cyberpunk collides with pop culture nostalgia, and how could you not get nerd out about a book that celebrates iconic elements of the 1980s? I mean, Family Ties is referenced! Oingo Boingo gets a mention.

Here comes the plot set-up, and maybe a ***SPOILER ALERT*** now.

The year is 2044, and the global population endures its fourth decade of economic collapse. Huzzah. In a world of fading prospects and rapidly dwindling natural resources, everyone's favorite pastime is the Oasis, a massive, all-inclusive multiplayer online game that had metamorphosed into a globally networked virtual reality universe what's now habitually accessed by nearly everyone on the planet. The Oasis has become such a panoptic entity, it's become synonymous with the Internet. In the Oasis, kids attend virtual school, business offices can purchase virtual landscape to promote their wares, virtual concerts are staged. Who wouldn't prefer this utopian cyberspace over bleak reality? When they can look for James Halliday's fabled Easter egg, nestled somewhere in the vastness of Oasis?

Eccentric genius video game designer - and creator of Oasis - James Halliday, before dying, recorded a video in which he challenges all comers to seek out his hidden treasure, to first unearth and then figure out the clues he'd embedded in the fabric of his Oasis program. His Easter egg, when found, conveys untold riches and power and unfettered administrative control over the Oasis. Overnight, the hunt for Halliday's treasure became the new global recreation. Halliday's addiction with 1980s pop culture was well documented, and so, too, in their feverish pursuit did these Easter egg hunters - nicknamed "gunters" - immerse themselves in Halliday's obsession, triggering a global revival of 1980s culture. But years and years would elapse before the elusive first clue would surface. Meanwhile, the gunters developed into figures of ridicule.

In the slums of Oklahoma City, in the Stacks - a decaying community in which run-down trailer homes are stacked on top of each other - 18-year-old orphan Wade Watts ekes out a miserable existence. Reclusive and anti-social, Wade is a low-level but dedicated gunter, a walking talking encyclopedia of vintage 1980s facts and trivia. He realizes that his only hope for a better life is to win the game. And so he perseveres when so many have given up. And, even though he's only a self-declared "third level wimp," he works out the location of the first clue. It's a life-changing thing.

The virtual scoreboard allows everyone to track his and other competitors' progress. Wade - or, rather, his avatar Parzival - becomes an instant worldwide celebrity - making him the target of fellow gunters and groupies and the media and, worse, of sinister corporations hungry to seize control of the Oasis. In his quest for Halliday's holy grail, Wade Watts - alliteratively named by his comic book-reading father - must call on every bit of his tech savvy and knowledge of 1980s culture to outwit his competitors and enemies. He is an awesome character that boasts impressive measures of pluck and resourcefulness and audacity in the face of frightening odds. And Wade Watts only becomes more awesome once he's compelled to venture out into the real world for survival's sake.

If the cyberpunk yarns of William Gibson and Neal Stephenson tend to intimidate you, be at ease with Ready Player One. Ernie Cline has crafted an immensely accessible story. He makes you swim in nostalgia. I'm not a 1980s buff, but I'm an old cat who actually lived his childhood thru the '80s, and it is so much fun trying to catch all of Cline's references. Ready Player One is a well-told, richly realized, and incredibly satisfying adventure, one populated by appealing characters. There's even a sweet love story. Wade engages in an online flirtation with a talented fellow gunter named Art3mis, and so we get a peek into Wade's gnawing doubts as to what the person beneath the Art3mis avatar is really like (and even what she really looks like). But that's just misdirection. It's another character who drops the startling reveal.

"Unputdownable" isn't a real word, yet it's the perfect adjective for this book. I think that everyone, at some level, has a grain of geekness in them. If you've ever envisioned scenes of your favorite cartoons or animes interacting, if you've once loved a movie so much that you've memorized entire passages of its dialogue, or been influenced by a rock song to the extent that you'd picked up a guitar to learn the chords... Ernie Cline revives these feelings. Ready Player One moves like a locomotive, and there are scenes in it that will absolutely explode your nerdy brain. Ready Player One was a New York Times Bestseller. It's soon to be a blockbuster motion picture what's directed by Steven Spielberg, and, self-deprecating guy that he is, good luck to him trying to tamp down on the book's references to his movies. I'm hyped for the movie. But the book came first, and the book will have an even more special place in my nerd heart. It's easily in my top five favorite reads ever. Ready Player One, yeah, an immersive, imaginative, childhood-mining, unputdownable read. Armada, not so much.
AGAD
Tolkien wrote Lord of the Rings as a 'myth for the machine age.' I think RP1 is an imaginative fairy tale for the online-gamer / virtual reality age. And the picture isn't pretty. I'm not talking about the cliche'd 'environmental apocalypse' of the outside world that the gamers actually live in, but the way that VR *is* their reality, and, to the characters, and in a very truthful way, the only reality that matters.

That disturbing aspect of Cline's novel is imaginatively and entertainingly written. The first third of the novel is a marvel. I'd give it ten stars. The second two-thirds, like The Martian in many ways, is a bit repetitive and predictable in a TV-series sort of way.

The novel is worthy and well-written, and the fairy tale aspect is touching. You end up rooting for the heroes and heroine, and even get a small glimpse into the motivations and heart of the villain (though I think he could have been much better presented, a la J. K. Rowling's villains).

All in all, a highly enjoyable book. The best take I've read on VR and online gaming. Plus it's lots of fun!
Manarius
My dad out of all people suggested this book. He is awesome. I am a 80`s and 90`s child, grew up on Atari, Nintendo, Sega, PC, and currently PlayStation. I immediately connected with this book and upon reading chapter after chapter gathered that the author is a video game/PC enthusiast. His lingo, and style are unique yet he can tell a story to your average dad such as mine whom has little or no experience dabbling with gaming.

I look forward to the movie, I have confidence knowing the author wrote the script and worked alongside Speilberg among others to put this film together. Fun book. We'll see about the movie..
Onaxan
Eureka! I finally found one: an audiobook that I loved. I mean what 80’s baby wouldn’t appreciate an audiobook narrated by Wil Wheaton loaded with 80’s pop culture references to boot? Fun Fact: my favorite Wil Wheaton movie is Toy Soldiers.

I will admit that when I first read the synopsis of this book I didn’t think it was my jam. My best friend convinced me otherwise and boy was she right! I loved it! Like really loved it. I am not sure if I would have felt the same way reading the book versus listening; I think since I enjoyed the narration that I was more engaged. Either way I now can’t wait for the movie coming out in March.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline is about a highly introverted billionaire, James Halliday, whom leaves his fortune and control of his company to one lucky winner of a treasure hunt he has created inside the virtual reality environment (the Oasis) that he has also created (Wow, realized I wrote a sentence that could easily become some sort of tongue twister). Halliday loves the 80’s: its music, movies and video games…if you don’t, well then you probably would not have had a chance at winning the prize (and would not enjoy this book/audiobook as much).

As someone who is not typically a fan of this genre, what Cline and Wheaton did with this story kept my attention. I did not harp too much on the numerous stereotypes within the book (stereotypical traits of gamers, nerds, and the like) and took the story for what it was (well, to me at least): an entertaining story that brought me into a new world that had me fully engaged from the start. I will certainly be expanding my reading selections moving forward.

Still need convincing (or just enjoying my review)?: One of the book’s main characters is a strong female heroine who is super smart and kicks butt.

Movie will be released March 29, 2018…countdown is on! Who’s coming with me?