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by Russell Baker

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Author: Russell Baker
ISBN: 0312927835
Language: English
Pages: 326 pages
Category: Humor
Publisher: Congdon & Weed; 1st edition (September 1, 1980)
Rating: 4.6
Formats: docx rtf lrf lit
FB2 size: 1501 kb | EPUB size: 1998 kb | DJVU size: 1319 kb

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Those who wish to express their opinions on the circumstances of 2011 would be well advised to read him, to learn from his wise and good-humoured example, before they commit their views to the ether.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading So This is Depravity. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Russell Baker (Author).

It is not that Russell Baker is funny, his genius is being so true that nothing remains but to laugh. John Kenneth Galbraith. Baker, like Andy Rooney, looks into things that keep all our lives from being ordinary. Chattanooga News-Free Press.

Russell Baker, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and New York Times columnist, died on Monday . So This Is Depravity.

Russell Baker, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author and New York Times columnist, died on Monday night at his home in Leesburg, Va. The Times’s obituary, which called Baker one of the best-known newspaper humorists of his time, noted that his whimsical, irreverent ‘Observer’ column appeared in The New York Times and hundreds of other newspapers for 36 years and turned a backwoods-born Virginian into one of America’s most celebrated writers.

Russell Wayne Baker, American columnist, writer. So This Is Depravity and Other Observations Russell Baker. ZJ00E/?tag prabook0b-20. The Rescue of Miss Yaskell: And Other Pipe Dreams.

So this is depravity. by. Baker, Russell, 1925-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Discover Russell Baker famous and rare quotes. So This Is Depravity and Other Observations". Book by Russell Baker, 1980. Journalist: A person with nothing on his mind and the power to express it.

Russell Baker (August 14, 1925 – January 21, 2019) was an American writer best known as a newspaper columnist . So This Is Depravity" (. 5). Some years back, all the best people came to bipartisan agreement that the most shameful thing a person could do with power was not to use it.

Russell Baker (August 14, 1925 – January 21, 2019) was an American writer best known as a newspaper columnist and author of memoirs on his life and times. So This Is Depravity (1980). There's a Country in My Cellar (1990). Since then everybody who wants to get ahead in Washington has made a great show of being a fierce fellow when left alone in the room with a little power.

Those who wish to express their opinions on the circumstances of 2011 would be well advised to read him, to learn from his wise and good-humoured example, before they commit their views to the ether.

Russell Baker, whose droll observations on Washington and the world were a fixture in The New York Times for 36 years, and who won a large second following as the longtime host of PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre," has died, The Times confirmed Tuesday. Baker, who was 93, died Monday at his home in Leesburg, Virginia, a suburb of Washington. His death was announced Tuesday by The Inquirer and Mirror newspaper in Nantucket, Connecticut, where Baker had a summer home, and confirmed by The Times on Tuesday night.

Kirkus' Review Observer"" columns from Russell Baker are the perfect light-beer chasers for the hard-stuff of daily news--but few of the short pieces in this pleasant, bland collection stand up well to the sterner tests of time and hard-cover compilation. The most obvious sufferers from the format, of course, are dated columns on the political scene--lots on Watergate--that are usually common-sensical enough (""this suggestion of men enacting boyish fantasies is worse than whatever crimes may have been committed. . .""), yet often over-simplified and a bit preachy. But other pieces that should be less frayed by time--on inflation, language (the ""Have a nice day"" craze), the sexual revolution, city living (parking, cabs, noise), marriage, parenthood, taxes--also tend to seem rather limp in retrospect: Baker can get cheaply sentimental (""Old people at the supermarket are being crushed and nobody is even screaming""); he often runs the risk of registering only as a less-funny Erma Bombeck (supermarket lines, washing machines). And, when consciously emulating Mencken or Perelman or Woody Allen, he consistently lacks the edge needed for that darker brand of humor. Still, none of these never-too-long pieces is without a smile or two, especially for those partial to wistful looks back to cleaner, simpler times. And in certain areas, Baker is superb: TV commercials bring out his cleanest swipes; historical whimsies inspire him to glorious flights of anachronism; and one column here is bona fide classic--""Cooped Up,"" in which the ghost of Gary C. accompanies Baker to movies that have junked all the old Coop-movie values. Less impressive the second time around, then--but Baker fans and others will find it literate, gently amusing bedside reading that's smoothly mainstream all the way.