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by Lars B. Lindholm

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Author: Lars B. Lindholm
ISBN: 0875424740
Language: English
Pages: 222 pages
Category: Cooking by Ingredient
Publisher: Llewellyn Publications; 1st edition (January 1, 1993)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: docx mbr mbr doc
FB2 size: 1567 kb | EPUB size: 1315 kb | DJVU size: 1335 kb
Sub: Cookbooks

The author assumes the usual meaning of the word and delves perhaps not too deeply into the raging waters of Western magical history. The book is divided into several chapters.

The author assumes the usual meaning of the word and delves perhaps not too deeply into the raging waters of Western magical history. The book is divided into several chapters

Pilgrims of the Night book .

Pilgrims of the Night book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Pilgrims of the Night. by. Lars B. Lindholm.

Here is a fresh, unprejudiced and exceptionally readable examination of the evolution of magical theory and practice in Western culture

Here is a fresh, unprejudiced and exceptionally readable examination of the evolution of magical theory and practice in Western culture. In his often humorous style, Lars B. Lindholm traces the history of magic from the earliest times to modern, encountering colorful personalities such as Thomas Aquinas, Henry Cornelius Agrippa, John Dee, and Aleister Crowley along the wa. (more). No current Talk conversations about this book.

The Way of a Pilgrim, or The Pilgrim's Tale is the English title of a 19th-century Russian work, recounting the narrator's journey as a mendicant pilgrim while practising the Jesus Prayer. The pilgrim's travels take him through southern and central Ukraine, Russia, and Siberia

The fifth book in the Megan Lindholm (Robin Hobb) backlist. Seattle: a place as magical as the Emerald City. Subtle magic seeps through the cracks in the paving stones of the sprawling metropolis.

The fifth book in the Megan Lindholm (Robin Hobb) backlist. Wizard is bound to Seattle and her magic. His gift is the Knowing – a powerful enchantment allowing him to know the truth of things; to hear the life-stories of ancient mummies.

Book two in the Lindholm Saga. And the coming of Anderfall's Summer Festival will act as a perfect cover. A direct sequel to Fallen Shore, Reprieve tells the story of a young man trying to find peace among a world torn to shreds by conflict.

ew sourceView history. The Whispering Way is a cruel and secret organization and philosophy promoting undeath that has been active for thousands of years. The tenets are whispered one to another and never written down. The symbol of the Whispering Way is a gagged skull. The Whispering Way is one of the oldest active organizations on Golarion, its origins stretching back to the Age of Darkness.

Pilgrims of the Night : Pathfinders of the Magical Wa.

Pilgrims of the Night : Pathfinders of the Magical Way. by Lars B. Lindholm traces the history of magic from the earliest times to modern, encountering colorful personalities such as Thomas Aquinas, Henry Cornelius Agrippa, John Dee, and Aleister Crowley along the way.

pathfinders of the magical way. 1st ed.

Here is a fresh, unprejudiced and exceptionally readable examination of the evolution of magical theory and practice in Western culture. In his often humorous style, Lars B. Lindholm traces the history of magic from the earliest times to modern, encountering colorful personalities such as Thomas Aquinas, Henry Cornelius Agrippa, John Dee, and Aleister Crowley along the way.
Comments (2)
Kemath
Pilgrims of the Night or Pathfinders of the Magical Way is a fascinating book about the most prominent figures in the history of magic. The subject of magic is defined rather loosely but that would deserve a book of itself to describe it properly. The author assumes the usual meaning of the word and delves perhaps not too deeply into the raging waters of Western magical history.

The book is divided into several chapters. As nothing much is really known about ancient history of magic, the author frankly admits it and gives sketchy outlines or biographies of such figures as Albertus Magnus, Roger Bacon, Cornelius Agrippa and John Dee.

In the chapter on Renaissance magic he starts giving more details but then the book becomes a description of history of Western magical orders starting with Rosicrucians and Freemasons and ending with the famous order of the Golden Dawn. A special attention is given to such prominent figures as Mathers and Crowley. There is also a chapter about Hitler. And finally a "new" magic or rather cult inspired by works of Lovecraft.

What is so unusual and refreshing about this book is that throughout the whole book the author maintains an ironic and rather skeptical attitude about the whole subject. He does not directly say that it is all BS, on the contrary he admits that there is something in it but he definitely acknowledges the fact that there is lots of deceit and plain power struggle when it comes to magic.

In fact the author keeps a peculiarly reticent attitude about the Necronomicon which is a subject of the last chapter. While admitting that all the existing copies are fake, he also admits that the magic in some of them works. Whatever that means. Another peculiarity is that he does not mention Simon Necronomicon by name except by briefly referring to it in a footnote. Very strange indeed, considering that it is the most famous copy of Necronomicon. Copies of Simon Necronomicon are freely available on the net so interested readers can always check them out for themselves.

There are also several interesting appendices in this book that should be a chapter by themselves but they are not, strictly speaking, about the history but rather an attempt to explain magic and other subjects closely connected with it. There are some fascinating insights there.

So I highly recommend this book. You won't find any propaganda (not overt, anyway) for doing magic. It is definitely a good primer as far as the history of Western magical orders go, though an advanced scholar perhaps won't find any new information there. For a novice, however, it is perfect: it sums up everything into succulent points and make it a very enjoyable read. And the book is quite short too, so no danger of it becoming too boring.

I found it one of the best reads on the subject of magic. It does not describe any techniques like spells, sigils, etc. It is basically a history of Western magical orders and some of the most memorable (to the author at least) moments in its history. It has curious gaps but on the whole it is an excellent book.
Niwield
Do you think Wicca is a religion thousands of years old? Do you know about the connection between Freemasonry and the Golden Dawn and the Nazis? If you are interested in getting an overview of the history of magick, this is a good place to start. This fairly brief book (222 pages) provides an overview of many of the most influential persons and institutions of the western occult tradition. Some of the topics: Prehistoric and Ancient Magic, Dark Age and Medieval Magic, the Qabalah, the Church, Roger Bacon, Trithemius, Albertus Magnus, Agrippa, John Dee, the Rosicrucians and Freemasonry, Albert Pike, Cagliostro, Francis Barrett and "The Magus", Eliphas Levi, Madame Blavatsky, Westcott and Mathers and the whole Golden Dawn crew, Aleister Crowley, A.E. Waite (associated with the most popular form of the Tarot deck), Dion Fortune, Anton LaVey, Israel Regardie, magickal orders, occult Nazis, H.P. Lovecraft and more. It's not exhaustive, it's irreverant, and it will certainly introduce you to the historic cast of characters in the subculture of western magick.