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by Tim Stark

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Author: Tim Stark
ISBN: 0767927060
Language: English
Pages: 240 pages
Category: Professionals & Academics
Publisher: Broadway Books; 1st edition (July 15, 2008)
Rating: 4.1
Formats: doc lrf azw lit
FB2 size: 1446 kb | EPUB size: 1720 kb | DJVU size: 1802 kb

Every year, Tim Stark’s gorgeous tomatoes serve as the sign that summer has arrived.

Every year, Tim Stark’s gorgeous tomatoes serve as the sign that summer has arrived. Tim has put as much craft into this book as he puts into his annual harvests. Daniel Boulud, Chef, Restaurateur. Tim Stark is the poet laureate of the nightshade and of Eastern Pennsylvania; his tomatoes and peppers burst on the mind’s palate as his native landscape comes to shaley, fecund life under his hands. Whether he is bantering with a farmer's market customer or accepting a free meal from a five-star chef, the spark of necessary human interaction comes through effortlessly in his prose.

Tim Stark was an aspiring author doing various makeweight jobs in New York City when he got preoccupied with trying . Published by Thriftbooks.

Tim Stark was an aspiring author doing various makeweight jobs in New York City when he got preoccupied with trying to raise heirloom tomatoes in his Brooklyn apartment. When his landlord put his foot down, Stark relocated his tomatoes and himself to his boyhood home in Lenhartsville, in Berks County, Pennsylvania, which is within the farming region of the Pennsylvania Dutch and about a two-hour drive from NYC (assuming no traffic jams). com User, 11 years ago. Heirloom: Notes From an Accidental Tomato Farmer is the bestselling book at my local coffeehouse in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. It is the only book for sale at the Uptown.

Start by marking Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer. Situated beautifully at the intersection of Michael Pollan, Ruth Reichl, and Barbara Kingsolver, Heirloom is an inspiring, elegiac, and gorgeously written memoir about rediscovering an older and still vital way of life. Fourteen years ago, Tim Stark was living in Brooklyn, working days as a management consultant, and writing unpublished short stories by night.

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Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer. One evening, chancing upon a Dumpster full of discarded lumber, he carried the lumber home and built a germination rack for thousands of heirloom tomato seedlings. His crop soon outgrew the brownstone in which it had sprouted, forcing him to cart the seedlings to his family’s farm in Pennsylvania, where they were transplanted into the ground by hand.

Farmer and writer Tim Stark illustrates the latter with chaotic flair in Heirloom: Notes From An Accidental Tomato Farmer. With a little ingenuity, 3,000 tomato seedlings were soon sprouting in Stark’s brownstone garret. Stark, who had been living in Brooklyn, . laboring as a consultant by day and struggling writer by night, happened upon an intriguing pile of garbage. The twist of water pipes and two-by-fours inspired a vision of a seed germination rack. With a little ingenuity, 3,000 tomato seedlings were soon sprouting in Stark’s brownstone garret

Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Tomato Farmer.

Heirloom Tomato Farmer Finds Beauty In The Ugly Tim Stark was a management consultant when he stumbled into heirloom tomato farming, as he describes in Heirloom: Notes from an Accidental Farmer. Tip: The ugliest tend to be tastiest. Now his tomatoes are served in the finest New York restaurants. Heirloom Tomato Farmer Finds Beauty In The Ugly.

What Stark began as a lark - 3,000 heirloom tomato seeds started in a Brooklyn apartment - has become a thriving business that supplies scores of Manhattan restaurants. It's a satisfying journey that began long before "local sourcing" was a buzzword.

Situated beautifully at the intersection of Michael Pollan, Ruth Reichl, and Barbara Kingsolver, Heirloom is an inspiring, elegiac, and gorgeously written memoir about rediscovering an older and still vital way of life.Fourteen years ago, Tim Stark was living in Brooklyn, working days as a management consultant, and writing unpublished short stories by night. One evening, chancing upon a Dumpster full of discarded lumber, he carried the lumber home and built a germination rack for thousands of heirloom tomato seedlings. His crop soon outgrew the brownstone in which it had sprouted, forcing him to cart the seedlings to his family’s farm in Pennsylvania, where they were transplanted into the ground by hand. When favorable weather brought in a bumper crop, Tim hauled his unusual tomatoes to New York City’s Union Square Greenmarket, at a time when the tomato was unanimously red. The rest is history. Today, Eckerton Hill Farm does a booming trade in heirloom tomatoes and obscure chile peppers. Tim’s tomatoes are featured on the menus of New York City’s most demanding chefs and have even made the cover of Gourmet magazine.

Comments (7)
Shezokha
Tim Stark was an aspiring author doing various makeweight jobs in New York City when he got preoccupied with trying to raise heirloom tomatoes in his Brooklyn apartment. When his landlord put his foot down, Stark relocated his tomatoes and himself to his boyhood home in Lenhartsville, in Berks County, Pennsylvania, which is within the farming region of the Pennsylvania Dutch and about a two-hour drive from NYC (assuming no traffic jams). HEIRLOOM recounts Stark's ten or so years raising organic produce -- principally, heirloom tomatoes, but also chile peppers and sugar snap peas among many others -- on a few acres in Pennsylvania and then selling his produce at the Union Square Greenmarket and to some of the best restaurants in New York City.

Stark confronts an endless succession of obstacles and problems -- ignorance, weather, inadequate and balky equipment, lack of ready cash, insufficient labor, an obstreperous jerk of a neighbor, and insects, deer, and gophers -- each of which he somehow overcomes, or circumvents, or, at a minimum, learns to live with. Thankfully (for me, at least), Stark does not dwell on tedious agricultural details. This is not a gardener's journal; if anything, it probably is of greater interest to the appreciative consumer of organic farming than the practitioner. Interesting subjects discussed at some length are the Amish and Mennonites of the area, the farmer/chef relationships that have developed and undergird some of the most noted restaurants in NYC, and the bleak future for similar agricultural operations catering to urban markets, due to shrinking affordable farmland.

Stark's writing is above average, occasionally quite good, but it is uneven and at times a little disjointed and unnecessarily confusing. The last chapter in particular seems rushed. Stark should have given the book one more thorough review and revision, but I suspect that would have been asking too much of his rather restless personality. Still, HEIRLOOM is an enjoyable sketch of an interesting slice of contemporary Americana that can be read in a day or two.
Magis
More than you'll ever need to know about the frustrations of tomato farming. But if you are into organic growing could be an enriching story.
JoJolar
NOTHING beats a homegrown, in season tomato. If you agree, you will adore this book, but it is so much more. Lessons on perserverance and life. Hope the next few crops will still allow the author to continue writing. I ate a tomato salad in NYC a few years ago that had to be from this farm. Carnivore that I am, I orderded a SECOND salad!
Vispel
I like Tim's style of writing, he is good to unwind with after a tense day. His humor comes through in the mundane affairs on the 'farm' as well as in the unexpected. i haven't finished the book yet but i know it will be a relaxing and enjoyable read.
Thordigda
Not what I expected but nevertheless an interesting subject. In lieu of a typical gardening compendium, this book is an account of one man's pursuit of a lifelong occupation. He begins as a stagnated writer and evolves into a truck farmer who grows heirloom vegetable varieties to market in the NY City. The story is told utilizing many anecdotes that depict snippets of his life associations and endeavors to make a living from a difficult occupation.
Kipabi
I had such high hopes for this book, but, I was disappointed about 30 pages into it--I had hoped that Stark would talk about the connection to the land, the familial joys of being an accidental farmer, allow the reader to bask in the beauty of heirloom tomatoes, but he didn't. I started to believe that I had heard the best part of the book in his NPR interview. There are moments of beautiful writing, but, it's not consistent. Page after page about sitting in traffic, pulling weeds and remembering tractors begins to wear on any reader, even an interested one. Unless you've got lots of mental time to kill, I wouldn't recommend it!
Onath
Being interested in one day changing careers from financial industry to the vegetable industry, I could identify with the author. This is really a "How To" book on starting an Heirloom vegetable business, only written in a storytelling fashion. Every chapter exudes the author's passion.
Chances are, you'll find this book a disappointment if you're not a Foodie. I'm borderline, so the book had it's moments for me. It's fairly repetitive, as if the author wrote chapters independent of each other without making any references back to previous writings. If you live in the NY Metro area (which I do), you'll have a deeper appreciation for the locales and events. You can only mention the Newtown Pippin apple so many times.....