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by Jean Edward Smith

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Author: Jean Edward Smith
ISBN: 0684849275
Language: English
Pages: 784 pages
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (April 9, 2002)
Rating: 4.8
Formats: doc mobi doc rtf
FB2 size: 1933 kb | EPUB size: 1544 kb | DJVU size: 1169 kb

Jean Edward Smith in an undated photo. The book was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize in biography, which went to David McCullough for John Adams

Jean Edward Smith in an undated photo. George F. Will called him today’s foremost biographer of formidable figures in American history. By Katharine Q. Seelye. Jean Edward Smith, a political scientist and renowned biographer whose works helped restore luster to the tarnished reputations of underrated presidents, died on Sept. 1 at his home in Huntington, . a. The book was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize in biography, which went to David McCullough for John Adams. Similarly, in Eisenhower in War and Peace (2012), Dr. Smith refuted the common perception of Eisenhower as a dullard.

Jean Edward Smith (October 13, 1932 – September 1, 2019) was a biographer and the John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall University

Jean Edward Smith (October 13, 1932 – September 1, 2019) was a biographer and the John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall University. He was also professor emeritus at the University of Toronto after having served as professor of political economy there for thirty-five years. Smith was also on the faculty of the Master of American History and Government program at Ashland University.

Jean Edward Smith's Grant is an impressive achievement in biography. With this biography, he expanded the conventional picture of Grant, revealing him as a heroic figure who was strong, dedicated, resilient and persevering, yet also flawed. Grant was a tight-lipped stoic who seldom showed his feelings – but beneath that shell was a warm and sensitive man with artistic sensibilities, dedicated to his family, loyal Jean Edward Smith's Grant is an impressive achievement in biography.

Also by jean edward smith. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. George Bush’s War. Lucius D. Clay: An American Life. The Conduct of American Foreign Policy Debated. E. with herbert M. levine). Published in the United States by Random House Trade Paperbacks, an imprint. of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York. RANDOM HOUSE TRADE PAPERBACKS and colophon are trademarks. of Random House, Inc. Originally published in hardcover in the United States by Random House, an imprint of.

1 at his home in Huntington, .

In this biography, Jean Edward Smith reconciles these conflicting assessments of Grant's life. He argues convincingly that Grant is greatly underrated as a president. Following the turmoil of Andrew Johnson's administration, Grant guided the nation through the post-Civil War era, overseeing Reconstruction of the South and enforcing the freedoms of new African-American citizens

In this extraordinary volume, Jean Edward Smith presents a portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower that is as full, rich, and revealing as. .

In this extraordinary volume, Jean Edward Smith presents a portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower that is as full, rich, and revealing as anything ever written about America's thirty-fourth president. Here is Eisenhower the young dreamer, charting a course from Abilene, Kansas, to West Point and beyond. Drawing on a wealth of untapped primary sources, Smith provides new insight into Ike's maddening apprenticeship under Douglas MacArthur. Then the whole panorama of World War II unfolds, with Eisenhower's superlative generalship forging the Allied path to victory.

Grant by Jean Edward Smith - Ulysses S. Grant was the first four-star general in the history of the United States Army and the only president between Andrew. More books from this author: Jean Edward Smith. Thank you for signing up, fellow book lover! Tell us what you like and we'll recommend books you'll love. Audiobooks Book Club Newsletter Biography & Autobiography Business & Personal Finance Children Christian Cooking. eBooks Entertainment & Pop Culture History New Releases Mystery Politics Romance.

Электронная книга "Grant", Jean Edward Smith Jean Edward Smith taught at the University of Toronto for thirty-five years, and at Marshall University for twelve.

Электронная книга "Grant", Jean Edward Smith. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Grant" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Jean Edward Smith taught at the University of Toronto for thirty-five years, and at Marshall University for twelve. He was also a visiting scholar at Columbia, Princeton, and Georgetown.

Finalist, Pulitzer Prize in BiographyUlysses S. Grant was the first four-star general in the history of the United States Army and the only president between Andrew Jackson and Woodrow Wilson to serve eight consecutive years in the White House. As general in chief, Grant revolutionized modern warfare. As president, he brought stability to the country after years of war and upheaval. Yet today Grant is remembered as a brilliant general but a failed president. In this comprehensive biography, Jean Edward Smith reconciles these conflicting assessments of Grant's life. He argues convincingly that Grant is greatly underrated as a president. Following the turmoil of Andrew Johnson's administration, Grant guided the nation through the post-Civil War era, overseeing Reconstruction in the South and enforcing the freedoms of new African-American citizens. His presidential accomplishments were as considerable as his military victories, says Smith, for the same strength of character that made him successful on the battlefield also characterized his years in the White House.
Comments (7)
Oso
After reading this biography I have a new found respect for this great general and man who would not quit. There is no question that Grant was a superb leader. The calm, steady, unflagging mentality he brought to the field instilled trust throughout the ranks. Though perhaps lacking the Southern class of Robert E. Lee or the genius of Stonewall Jackson--Ulysses S. Grant more than made up for it by his sheer fight. His directness in battle was often criticized by his peers (going against the military grain of the day), but it proved more than effective. It was exactly what the Union needed to win. No battle epitomizes Grant's fighting mentality more than the battle of Shiloh. After a crushing first day of over 7,000 Union casualties, a shattered and disheartened Sherman approached Grant and said, " Well, Grant, we've had the devil's own day, haven't we?" Grant's response between cigar puffs is classic Grant: "Yes. Yes. Lick 'em tomorrow though." Turns out that is exactly what he did.

Grant's resilience was formed in the dark years before the Civil War. Prone to terrible financial luck, every business venture Grant's hand touched was undoubtedly cursed to fail. I was surprised to learn that before the war Grant spent years in poverty. Struggling to live and support his family, he spent hours a day selling fire wood on a street corner. These years molded Grant and prepared him for what was to come.

In battle Grant was resilient. In victory he was gracious. In peace he was principled. Much of Smith's account records the presidency of U. S. Grant (and while I was far more interested in the Civil War) I was pleased to learn that while not a great President, Grant was a good one. He improved relations with England, helped to rebuild the South, supported oppressed people groups (Native Americans & African Americans), and vetoed a dangerous inflationary bill. Much is made of the scandals and bribes that occurred throughout the Grant administration, and perhaps rightfully so. Grant's radical loyalty for his friends and simplistic trust of people proved destructive. However, flawed as he was, I cannot deny that Grant was just the man the United States needed--both during and after the war.

As to the biography itself, I was impressed with Smith's account. I found it to be very scholarly and yet easy to read. My complaints are too few maps, and I found certain parts before and after the war rather dull. All in all a very good--solid account.
Rishason
An excellent and illuminating biography of an underrated president, and good man. I had heard good things about Grant, but was also aware that Grant did not have a great reputation with some historians. This book showed me that while Grant was not a perfect president, he was a good and honest one. He fought for Reconstruction, he fought for Plains Indians, and he did his best in all he could for his country. He could have been elected for a third term for president even!

In any case, the majority of the biography focuses on the civil war and Grant in the military. It begins in Mexico, covers his desititute years between the Mexican War and the Civil War, and then Grant's rise during the Civil War. While you never get to feel like you know who Grant is on a personal level, the writing lets you see the war Grant did, and just how steady and clear-headed Grant was. You also get the strong sense of honesty that was Grant's great strength, and in some ways, his weakness (he was betrayed in business so many times, I can't actually recall how many times it happened).

As an introduction to Grant, this gives you a good overview of all of Grant's failures and successes. It is interesting throughout, and I always wanted to keep reading more. Great man, great biography.
Yggfyn
A great book in many respects. First, it was well written. A little slow at times with troop movements, units, and their commanders, but if you're a Civil War buff (and I can't really count myself as one), all that is right up your alley. The maps helped to give the reader some idea of how the battles - and there were a lot of them - progressed.

For me, the most insightful chapters came between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Grant's presidency. I had no idea how much animosity there was for Andrew Johnson among the military and members of Congress. His footnote in history is inevitably tied to his status as the first President ever impeached, but this book does an outstanding job of describing the background behind those soured relationships. It also shows how weak the office of the President was back then. Backed by Republicans in Congress and his own immense popularity, Grant was routinely able to defy his Commander-in-Chief on numerous occasions during Reconstruction. A military officer exhibiting similar defiance to a President today is simply unthinkable.

Finally, this book does a superb job of illuminating the character of Abraham Lincoln. After all that has been written about our greatest President, I did not think this possible, but sometimes the best insights to a personality come from books written about other people who knew him. I was continually struck by Lincoln's humility in his correspondence with Grant, offering "suggestions" that could just as easily have been direct orders, coming as they did from the Commander-in-Chief. The two men became friends in part because both had that unique thirst for success that comes from men who have experienced an abundance of failure. Grant was Lincoln's seventh commander to lead the Union's armies in the East. Lincoln was Grant's ultimate protector - someone who would let him do his job no matter how long it took. Each had faith in the other, and this is one of those very unique partnerships in American history that served the country so well (Roosevelt and Eisenhower/Truman and Marshall also come to mind).

There's something in this book for every interest - military, political, and personal.