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by Nicholas Fox Weber

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Author: Nicholas Fox Weber
ISBN: 0679407375
Language: English
Pages: 656 pages
Category: Historical
Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (October 12, 1999)
Rating: 4.2
Formats: lit txt lit lrf
FB2 size: 1898 kb | EPUB size: 1915 kb | DJVU size: 1237 kb

Now, in Nicholas Fox Weber's superb biography, Balthus, the man and the artist, stands revealed as never before. He was born in Paris in 1908 to Polish parents.

Now, in Nicholas Fox Weber's superb biography, Balthus, the man and the artist, stands revealed as never before. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 25 сент.

- Publishers Weekly.

Balthus: A Biography by Nicholas Fox Weber is the only major biography currently in print of the artist, born Balthasar Klossowski de Rola, who has a major survey opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art this week. Jeune fille au chat" Balthus 1937 - buster k - Fotolog

Balthus: A Biography by Nicholas Fox Weber is the only major biography currently in print of the artist, born Balthasar Klossowski de Rola, who has a major survey opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art this week. Jeune fille au chat" Balthus 1937 - buster k - Fotolog. Balthus and Lolita seem like a natural fit, if a bit too obvious. Emil Nolde, George Grosz, Man Ray, Ludwig, Biography, Artist, Social Realism, Biography Books.

Электронная книга "Balthus: A Biography", Nicholas Fox Weber. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Balthus: A Biography" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Nicholas Fox Weber runs the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, writes books and essays, and spearheads a non-profit organization he founded to assist with medical care and education in Senegal.

Nicholas Fox Weber, despite his status in the art establishment (he's the director of the Joseph Albers Foundation), isn't any different

Nicholas Fox Weber, despite his status in the art establishment (he's the director of the Joseph Albers Foundation), isn't any different. His "Balthus: A Biography" isn't a straightforward hatchet job, though, but a botched scalpel one. Balthus, a brutal snob, a ruthless social mountaineer, a lech and a nasty anti-Semite, is no innocent. Yet for much of his long life - he was born in 1908 - he's been handled with kid gloves by the culturati, and for good reason.

From Balthus A Biography by Nicholas Fox Weber. Nicholas Fox Weber is the author of fourteen books including The Bauhaus Group, Le Corbusier, The Clarks of Cooperstown, Balthus A Biography, Patron Saints, The Art of Babar, and The Drawings of Josef Albers

From Balthus A Biography by Nicholas Fox Weber. Nicholas Fox Weber is the author of fourteen books including The Bauhaus Group, Le Corbusier, The Clarks of Cooperstown, Balthus A Biography, Patron Saints, The Art of Babar, and The Drawings of Josef Albers. Anni Albers How To Become. The Foundation has become a pilgrimage point, and is so respected today that Sir Nicholas Serota, director of Tate in London, has called it the cream of artist’s foundations: the standard bearer.

Nicholas Fox Weber runs the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, writes books and essays, and spearheads a. .NFW is currently under contract with Knopf for a biography of Piet Mondrian, on which he has been working for five years.

Nicholas Fox Weber runs the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, writes books and essays, and spearheads a non-profit organization he founded to assist with medical care and education in Senegal. Books by Nicholas Fox Weber. published by Alfred A. Knopf. Biography · Art · Essays Cultural History · Memoir. PATRON SAINTS Five Rebels who opened America to a new art 1928 – 1943.

From acclaimed biographer and cultural historian, author of Balthus and Patron Saints-the first full-scale life of le Corbusier, one of the most influential, admired, and maligned architects of the twentieth century, heralded is a prophet in his lifetime, revered as a god after his death. He was a leader of the modernist movement that sought to create better living conditions and a better society through housing concepts. In this first biography of the man, Nicholas Fox Weber writes about Le Corbusier the precise, mathematical

The first full-scale biography of one of the most elusive and enigmatic painters of our time -- the self-proclaimed Count Balthus Klossowski de Rola -- whose brilliantly rendered, markedly sexualized portraits, especially of young girls, are among the most memorable images in contemporary art.The story of Balthus's life has been shrouded by contradiction and hearsay, most of it his own invention; over the years he created for himself a persona of mystery, aristocracy, and glamour. Now, in Nicholas Fox Weber's superb biography, Balthus, the man and the artist, stands revealed as never before. He was born in Paris in 1908 to Polish parents. At age twelve he first stepped into the spotlight with the publication of forty of his drawings illustrating a story about a cat by Rainer Maria Rilke, who was then Balthus's mother's lover and a crucial influence on the young boy. From that moment, Balthus has never been out of the public eye. In 1934 his first exhibition, in Paris, stunned the art world. The seven canvases drew attention to his extraordinary technique -- a  mix of tradition and imagination informed by the work of Piero della Francesca, Courbet, and Joseph Reinhardt, but unique to the twenty-six-year-old artist -- and to their provocative content; one of the paintings, The Guitar Lesson, was so powerful in its sadomasochistic imagery that it was deemed necessary to remove it from public display. Continuously since then, Balthus's work has provoked both great opprobrium and profound admiration -- as has the artist himself, whether collaborating with Antonin Artaud on his Theater of Cruelty, transforming the Villa Medici into the social center of Fellini's Rome in the 1950s, or competing for the artistic limelight with his friends Picasso and André Derain.The artist's complexities are clarified and his genius understood in a book that derives its particular immediacy from Weber's long and intense conversations with Balthus -- who never previously consented to discuss his life and work with a biographer -- as well as his interviews with the painter's closest friends, members of his family, and many of the subjects of his controversial canvases.Weber's critical and human grasp (he acutely analyzes the paintings in terms of both their aesthetic achievement and what they reveal of their maker's psyche), combined with his rich knowledge of Balthus's life and his insight into the ideas and forces that have helped to shape Balthus's work over the past seven decades, gives us a striking, illuminating portrait of one of the most admired and outrageous artists of our time.
Comments (7)
Anaragelv
Weber clearly despises Balthus, finding him to be a self-denying Jew (that seems to be Balthus' original sin), a control freak, manipulative, despotic, self-aggrandizing, and virtually a pathological liar to boot. Weber thinks some of this can be understood with the help of amateur psychoanalysis, which at various points he is only too happy to provide.

The book contains a lot of information about Balthus's life and his art, but assertions and interpretations that otherwise might seem to be true, fair, and insightful -- and may, in fact, be all of those things -- are tainted by the ever-present noise of an axe being ground backstage. The book made me want to see a second opinion from somebody who actually found something, anything, to like about Balthus as a person.
Xwnaydan
This book has disappointed me greatly.To all the negative reviews displayed here I can only add more... Its apparently well researched subject is just a cover-up for making yet another buck, using an artist who is lesser known, often misunderstood and provocative. Any biography of Balthus would have been appreciated at the time of the artist's old age and the obviously quick aproach of death, and people like Mr. Weber, unfortunately, quite often are the first to write in such moments. This is not a book about Balthus or his life or his art, it is about quickly making a name for himself and some money off Balthus, in the name of his art, when it was still possible. Inaccessability of Balthus the person has allowed only a small circle of friends, family members, and patrons to benefit financially, and socially from Balthus's name and Art, however Mr.Weber, a parvenue as he is, craved for some of it too. The result - is this book, a book about infiltrating oneself ( or trying to) into a privileged society of artists, aristocrats, wealthy collectors, celebs etc. and then - just " telling all" about who they really are: pretenders, liers, perverts and above all - anti-Semites... I only regret three thing about this book: That I have spent money to buy it ( so contributing to the cause of Mr.Weber); that I have read this book ; that we have all here read this book. PS: To my knowledge, there is not a single Novgorod near Pinsk, or anywhere in Belarus, and Mr.Weber was probably alluding to Novogrudok ( Nowogrodek, Navahrudak) about 125km from Minsk. (Weber might have thought that throwing in some obscure town names from Eastern Europe and ambelishing that book with them would make his "research" look more professional)
Kinashand
This book would have benefitted greatly from a stronger editorial pen; half the book would have had twice the value.
As others have already noted, there is much good study in this book on Balthus. Unfortunately, there is no shortage of autobiography on the part of Mr. Weber, who has painted himself into the Balthus picture as an antagonist with this work. Mr. Weber is relentless in insisting on the importance of Freudian interpretation, as seen, for example, in this paragraph: "He [Balthus] suggested repeatedly that psychoanalysis was unworthy -- and intellectually dangerous. But in fact, in his earlier years -- when most people he knew treated Freudian thought with respect and admiration -- Balthus, like Rilke, may well have been one of those people who believed in 'the primary efficacy of self-treatment' through his work. He, too, may have been afraid that greater self-knowledge and mental hygiene would have prevented him from working through his fantasies and neuroses in the manner he chose -- which was to paint them. Not that Balthus would ever have voiced such sentiments at the stage of his existence in which I found him, but one can easily imagine him having had such views earlier on." This passage seems equally likely to bear out Balthus's concerns regarding psychoanalysis (Mr Weber admits being a patient of psychoanalysis). Mr. Weber is also relentless in tracing in some depth the Jewish ancestry of the painter's mother; you cannot help but feel that it has great personal importance to the biographer himself.
Mr. Weber does not seem to fully understand the 'eternal realities' that lie below the surface structure of a Poussin painting. He has in the same way misunderstood the meaning of Coomaraswamy to Balthus. Here some reading of Platonic thought on seeing the 'real' through the veil of the world, perhaps even through the eyes of Augustine, would have helped. Mr. Weber repeatedly remains stuck in 'the veil.'
Finally, the gratuitous and unkind personal observations which do not serve to elucidate any aspect of Balthus's work or character, but only hurt the artist's family, bring to ruin what had potentially been a fine biography. If only Mr. Weber possessed a fraction of the editorial skill of Balthus!