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by Winifred Holtby

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Author: Winifred Holtby
ISBN: 0849211190
Language: English
Category: Arts & Literature
Publisher: R. West (1977)
Rating: 4.5
Formats: azw mobi lrf rtf
FB2 size: 1594 kb | EPUB size: 1200 kb | DJVU size: 1484 kb

Winifred Holtby (23 June 1898 – 29 September 1935) was an English novelist and journalist, now best known for her novel South Riding, which was posthumously published in 1936. Holtby was born to a prosperous farming family in the village of Rudston,.

Winifred Holtby (23 June 1898 – 29 September 1935) was an English novelist and journalist, now best known for her novel South Riding, which was posthumously published in 1936. Holtby was born to a prosperous farming family in the village of Rudston, Yorkshire. Her father was David Holtby and her mother, Alice, was afterwards the first alderwoman on the East Riding County Council. Holtby was educated at home by a governess and then at Queen Margaret's School in Scarborough

At the beginning of Virginia Woolf second novel, Night and Day, is a description of what it feels like to be born the daughter of a distinguished literary family.

At the beginning of Virginia Woolf second novel, Night and Day, is a description of what it feels like to be born the daughter of a distinguished literary family. The quality of her birth oozed into Katharine's consciousness from a dozen different sources as soon as she was able to perceive anything. Her earliest conceptions of the world included an august circle of beings to whom she gave the names of Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Shelley, and so on, who were, for some reason. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Holtby gives us Woolf the critic, the essayist and the experimental novelist in a critical memoir which is of particular . Winifred Holtby was a novelist, journalist and social reformer, who campaigned for the causes of peace and sexual and racial equality.

Holtby's careful reading of Woolf's work is set in the context of the debate between modernist and traditional writing in the 1920s and 1930s. Her most famous work is the novel South Riding, published posthumously in 1936.

Virginia Woolf was perfectly aware of the book being written, making a note in her diary about it and following that up with a letter to Winifred Holtby saying that she looked forward to reading it. Fascinatingly the two women met once during the writing of the book, and Woolf arranged for a. . Fascinatingly the two women met once during the writing of the book, and Woolf arranged for an advance copy of The Waves to be sent to Winifred Holtby

Miss Holtby is writing a book on me, " Virginia Woolf noted in her diary in March 1931. Winifred Holtby was 33, a well-respected author with four novels and much journalism to her name

Miss Holtby is writing a book on me, " Virginia Woolf noted in her diary in March 1931. Winifred Holtby was 33, a well-respected author with four novels and much journalism to her name. She had yet to write her most famous novel, South Riding, but had already formed the close bond with Vera Brittain that was to lead to the latter writing Testament of Friendship in tribute.

Virginia Woolf: A Critical Memoir by Winifred Holtby is a study of the interconnection of Woof and her characters and her style of writing.

Holtby gives us Woolf the critic, the essayist and the experimental. Virginia Woolf: A Critical Memoir by Winifred Holtby is a study of the interconnection of Woof and her characters and her style of writing. Holtby is best known for writing South Riding while dying of Bright's disease. She was an ardent feminist, socialist and pacifist who published fourteen books before dying at thirty-seven. This book is intriguing on several levels.

Virginia Woolf: A Critical Memoir Nov 02, 2015. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Careers.

A Couple of Stops is a series of short stories designed to be read on short journeys. This book is part of the Light Transports series, ia set of three collections of short stories designed as pocket books for the commuter. The books are compiled with a series of stories that reflect differing lengths of journeys – A Couple of Stops, Commutes and Intercity.

Winifred Holtby (23 June 1898 – 29 September 1935) was an English novelist and journalist .

Winifred Holtby (23 June 1898 – 29 September 1935) was an English novelist and journalist, best known for her novel South Riding. As well as her journalism, Holtby wrote 14 books including six novels; two volumes of short stories; the first critical study of Virginia Woolf (1932) and "Women and a Changing Civilization" (1934), a feminist survey with opinions that are still relevant. She also wrote poetry, including poems about Vera Brittain's dead brother, Edward.

Comments (3)
Centrizius
Virginia Woolf: A Critical Memoir by Winifred Holtby is a study of the interconnection of Woof and her characters and her style of writing. Holtby is best known for writing South Riding while dying of Bright's disease. She was an ardent feminist, socialist and pacifist who published fourteen books before dying at thirty-seven.

This book is intriguing on several levels. First, it was written in 1932 while Woolf was still alive, and it concentrates on Woolf's work and the interconnectedness of the stories and with Woolf's own life. Although mentioned, Woolf's depression does not play a major role in this book and it does in many current books. Not being formally educated in English literature, I found the critique well done, informative, and not heavy handed. The examples and passages in the book illustrate Holtby thesis well.

The use of water in Woolf's life and in her books everything from The Voyage Out through The Waves (the last book written by Woolf before Holtby's book) all contain water references and themes. In Woolf's early memories of the beach at Cornwall and later tragically her death involved water. Water becomes ever present, but ever changing. It is always there; it rolls in and rolls out like the waves or life and death.

What may be more obvious to many is also brought up in Holtby's critique is Woolf’s preferences in her novels. It is not surprising that Woolf didn’t much care for plots in her writing. Not a single one of her novels had a climax. In The Voyage Out the South American jungle is nearly a copy of Sir Walter Raleigh’s Discovery of Guiana The plagiarism is Holtby explains is forgivable. The jungle setting was merely filler. In the South American town, surrounded by jungle, no wild animals are seen, in fact, nobody's even bothered by a single mosquito. The hospital is conveniently located near the hotel. The setting is simply background to Woolf.

If it isn’t plot, climax, or setting that Woolf writes about, it must be characters. Woolf spends great detail in creating characters. Holtby compares the characters to other historical novel character’s just as Jane Austen. Also interesting is that characters that reflect Woolf’s life are the best done. She struggles when she writes characters out of her station. The other thing that separates Woolf is style. Many of her writings have almost a lyrical quality to them. This is perhaps the main reason I enjoy reading Woolf.

Holtby analyzes Woolf’s writing and works. She had a particular interest in “The Mark on the Wall” and uses it often in her comparisons. Her treatment of “Kew Gardens” is quite well done. For the reader of this book a knowledge of Woolf’s writing (up until 1932) is very helpful and almost necessary. Holtby uses each work as references and comparisons and builds her case. Without knowing Mrs. Ramsey, Clarissa Dalloway, or Jacob Flanders, the reader would be lost. An excellent read for anyone familiar with, or struggling with, any of Woolf’s work.
The Sinners from Mitar
When I first saw the subtitle - a critical memoir, I was wondering if it was going to be critical of Virginia Woolf, but as I read further I soon realized that it is a literary critique of her works along with a biography of her life (up until the time it was written, 1932).
Holtby does an astonishing job diving into Woolf's works - made me remember just how much I used to enjoy my literature classes. She also made me want to read more of Woolf's works - and I have no doubt I would get even more out of her writings now, after reading Holtby's commentary.

A Critical Memoir was published in 1932, and it can't help but haunt me that Holtby herself passed away in 1936 - only 37 years old, while Woolf died in 1941. How we lose some of our greatest writers too soon.

I would highly recommend Virginia Woolf: A Critical Memoir to anyone who has enjoyed the works of Woolf, or are interested in writing or women's history of that time.

*I received a free advanced reader's copy through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*
Zorve
What really makes this book an especially engaging study is the fact that Holtby actually had the chance to interview Virginia Woolf herself. Published in 1932, this book looks at both the biographical and the bibliographical life of Virginia Woolf. Holtby discusses some of the biographical details of Woolf's life that seem to directly influence her writing, such as her depiction of her own parents in the portrayals of some of her characters. Holtby also examines Woolf's unusual upbringing among the elites of the Victorian literary society and her parents' well-connected friends in both the arts and literature.

I personally loved that Holtby not only provided an in-depth critique of Woolf's literary works and her writing style, but also a study of the life that led up to these works. Anyone who has read a book (or several) by Virginia Woolf can notice the themes, the motifs, the people, and the places that share a common thread of similarity in her stories. Whether it was her parents' doppelgangers in The Voyage Out and To the Lighthouse, or her haunting love of the sea borne of those summers spent on the Cornish coast, Woolf's cloistral yet uniquely fascinating life is portrayed in her writing.

Holtby is not merely criticizing an author's stories and stylistic choices, she is giving the reader an opportunity to know and to understand the writer behind them. While maintaining the objectivity of a scholar throughout the book, Holtby also manages to convey the veneration of a delighted colleague, and that is what makes an otherwise very scholarly book feel more like a story being shared with friends around a cozy fireplace.