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by Peter D. Kramer

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Author: Peter D. Kramer
ISBN: 0671890123
Language: English
Category: Theology
Publisher: Audioworks (April 1, 1994)
Rating: 4.4
Formats: lrf txt lit azw
FB2 size: 1289 kb | EPUB size: 1843 kb | DJVU size: 1996 kb
Sub: Bibles

Read by Peter Kramer. Listening to Prozac Audio, Cassette – Audiobook, April 1, 1994.

Read by Peter Kramer. by. Peter D. Kramer (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Listening to Prozac by Peter D. Kramer. Penguin Books, In. 1993. Granted, Kramer does not spend much time on the undesirable side effects of Prozac and other antidepressant drugs, but it's almost beside the point, since his emphasis tends towards philosophical and ethical efficacy, rather than medical efficacy. Kramer does not pretend to be doing anything other than laying bare some very challenging questions. He prescribed Prozac as an antidepressant and discovered that it was altering personalities-not in the far more negative way that was later found in cases of uncharacteristic violence, but in ways that patients perceived as positive.

Listening to Prozac book. JDB 2456527 PDT 10:52. This was a book with great potential, but it failed to live up to most of that potential

Listening to Prozac book. This was a book with great potential, but it failed to live up to most of that potential. The fundamental idea is a profound one that I wish more people would think about: What does cognitive science say about human nature?

In Listening to Prozac, Kramer had coined two terms that got absorbed into conversations about the morality of medicating . Kramer argues forcefully that they do. There have been many books published on both sides over the last few decades

In Listening to Prozac, Kramer had coined two terms that got absorbed into conversations about the morality of medicating depression: better than well and cosmetic psychopharmacology. Both speak to his misgivings about the widespread prescription of antidepressants. There have been many books published on both sides over the last few decades. This book would be yet another contribution to the literature of pro- and antidrug jeremiads except that it is so careful and measured and fair, and at times even candidly self-doubting, in its presentation, that it can’t be classified as such.

Listening to Prozac’. Kramer, reply by Sherwin B. Nuland. I’m pleased to see Peter Kramer’s spirited defense of his book, but it does make me wonder why he has chosen to further expose the thinking patterns that have already led him so far astray

Listening to Prozac’. In response to: The Pill of Pills from the June 9, 1994 issue. I’m pleased to see Peter Kramer’s spirited defense of his book, but it does make me wonder why he has chosen to further expose the thinking patterns that have already led him so far astray.

Listening to Prozac: A Psychiatrist Explores Antidepressant Drugs and the Remaking of the Self is a book written by psychiatrist Peter D. Written in 1993, the book discusses how the advance of the anti-depressant drug Prozac might change the. Written in 1993, the book discusses how the advance of the anti-depressant drug Prozac might change the way we see personality, the relationship between neurology and personality.

LISTENING TO PROZAC: A Psychiatrist Explores Mood-Altering Drugs and the New Meaning of the Self. Kramer, a practicing psychiatrist, finds that the antidepressant Prozac is a powerful drug that lifts the veil of depression from most patients without significant side effects

LISTENING TO PROZAC: A Psychiatrist Explores Mood-Altering Drugs and the New Meaning of the Self. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. A provocative volume that sets up the mood-altering Prozac as a tool to examine the growing-and often troubling-use of drugs in the treatment of psychological illness. Brown University professor. Kramer, a practicing psychiatrist, finds that the antidepressant Prozac is a powerful drug that lifts the veil of depression from most patients without significant side effects Читать весь отзыв.

by. Kramer, Peter D. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by KellyCritch on October 5, 2009.

5 4 5 Author: Peter D. Kramer Narrator: Peter D. Download books offline, listen to several books continuously, choose stories for your kids, or try out a book that you didn't thought you would like to listen to. The best book experience you'd ever had. The end of personality? Since it was introduce in 1987, the antidepressant Prozac has been prescribed to nearly five million Americans.

A look at mood-altering drugs examines the implications of chemical modification of intelligence and personality and what the personality-altering effects of the drug tell about the nature of character. Read by Peter Kramer. Book available.
Comments (7)
PC-rider
Prior to reading Kramer's now-classic ruminations on Prozac and its sibling drugs, I read Joseph Glenmullen's Prozac Backlash, a damning response to Kramer's work. Glenmullen is convincing and well documented (and speaks to my own prejudices); therefore, I was prepared to despise Kramer. I didn't. And I don't. Granted, Kramer does not spend much time on the undesirable side effects of Prozac and other antidepressant drugs, but it's almost beside the point, since his emphasis tends towards philosophical and ethical efficacy, rather than medical efficacy. Kramer does not pretend to be doing anything other than laying bare some very challenging questions. He prescribed Prozac as an antidepressant and discovered that it was altering personalities--not in the far more negative way that was later found in cases of uncharacteristic violence, but in ways that patients perceived as positive. Formerly shy people were far more outgoing. Kramer raises an important question: Is it ethical to withhold a treatment for painful shyness when the physician has no reason to diagnose depression? Dozens of (to me) frightening facts are reported; for instance, for the past fifty years it has been commonplace to make a diagnosis after observing drug side effects. In other words, now that we know that Prozac can cure shyness in some people, shyness is now a diagnosis that needs a cure. Particularly interesting and insightful is Kramer's observation that certain personality characteristics are valued (or de-valued) in various cultural scenarios, which change over time as well as from one group to another. Speaking of his client who overcame shyness as a side effect of her anti-depressant medication, he writes, "If we see Tess's transformation as a victory, it's because of a change in mores, because we value the assertive woman and shake our heads over the long-suffering self-sacrificer. Perhaps medication now risks playing a role that psychotherapy was accused of playing in the past: it allows a person to achieve happiness through conformity to contemporary norms." Kramer also cited a quite intriguing series of monkey studies, where researchers found that the Alpha male (tribal leader) had higher levels of serotonin than other males in the tribe. Also, when an Alpha male was defeated in a challenge to his leadership, his serotonin levels took an immediate dive. The researchers arbitrarily gave serotonin to male monkeys to see if it influenced the balance of power in the tribe. They found that, if the Alpha male had been removed, the serotonin-enhanced monkey quickly became the new leader. However, in the presence of a reigning Alpha male, the serotonin-enhanced monkey was unable to rise further than first lieutenant. Citing study after study of various components of brain chemistry, Kramer brings me to question the whole notion of personality as being an integral characteristic of the individual human being. More and more I become confused about how much of me is me and how much is a chemical soup that controls my emotions and behaviors. Glenmullen's book is the most constructive, in terms of revealing effective treatments for depression, yet I still recommend Kramer for his thoughtful evaluation of the possibilities represented by these drugs and his unabashed admission of the philosophical issues and ethical questions involved.
Kipabi
"Listening to Prozac" is one of those books that really makes you think about where the quick-paced world of science is going to take us in the future. Kramer carefully fingers the topics of "self" and psychopharmacological Calvinism, while articulating the history of modern neuropharmacology. Should a person have to bear the ordinary pains of life, or should we allow Prozac to provide a temporary escape? Can a person be "more like him/herself" after taking a little pill? Questions like these may never be answered, but this books helps teach the reader the basics on brain bio as well as the perspectives on brain philosophy necessary to make an informed decision.
blac wolf
Decent book about prozac. I'd recommend it for anyone who is prescribed prozac.
Ferne
Good insight into anti-depressants for anyone who has struggled with anxiety and panic and fear of starting a medication for relief.
Monn
Read it years ago, and was just a review. Very informative about the medication, Prozac.
Error parents
Best book on depression,next to author's Against Depression
Runehammer
All you need to know about a popular medicine that saves lives.
Amazing book. Amazing medicine.