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by Marvin A. Sweeney

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Author: Marvin A. Sweeney
ISBN: 0664220843
Language: English
Pages: 504 pages
Category: Bible Study & Reference
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press (September 4, 2007)
Rating: 4.9
Formats: lrf azw lrf mbr
FB2 size: 1499 kb | EPUB size: 1286 kb | DJVU size: 1166 kb
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I & II Kings (2007) book.

I & II Kings (2007) book.

Marvin Alan Sweeney (born, 1953; raised in Decatur, Illinois) is. .Reading Prophetic Books. Old Testament Library. Westminster John Knox, 2007). The Prophetic Literature. Interpreting Biblical Texts.

Marvin Alan Sweeney (born, 1953; raised in Decatur, Illinois) is Professor of Hebrew Bible at Claremont School of Theology. Dr. Sweeney was trained under the tutelage of Rolf P. Knierim at Claremont Graduate University. Forschungen zum Alten Testament, 89. (Mohr Siebeck 2014). Reading the Old Testament. Smyth & Helwys, 2013). Form and Intertextuality in Prophetic and Apocalyptic Literature. Forschungen zum Alten Testament, 45 (Mohr Siebeck, 2005).

Marvin A. Sweeney provides a major contribution to the prominent Old Testament Library series with advanced discussions of textual difficulties in the books of Kings as well as compelling narrative interpretations. The contributors are scholars of international standing. Westminster John Knox Press, 1 Oca 2007 - 476 sayfa.

About the Old Testament Library Series:The Old Testament Library is.

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I & II Kings Marvin A. Sweeney. Series: Old Testament Library Categories: 1/2 Kings Tags: TechnicalJewish. Pages: 476 Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press Published: 2007 ISBN-10: 0664220843 ISBN-13: 9780664220846.

Book Format: Choose an option. Sweeney provides a major contribution to the prominent Old Testament Library series with dvanced discussions of textual difficulties in the books of Kings as well as compelling narrative interpretations. Sweeney provides a major contribution to the prominent Old Testament Library series with advanced discussions of textual difficulties in the books . Author: Marvin A. Publisher: Westminster John Knox. Print Publication Date: 2007. Logos Release Date: 2014.

This volume offers a close reading of the historical books of I and II Kings, concentrating on not only issues in the history of Israel but also the literary techniques of storytelling used in these books. Marvin A. Sweeney provides a major contribution to the prominent Old Testament Library series with advanced discussions of textual difficulties in the books of Kings as well as compelling narrative interpretations.

The Old Testament Library provides fresh and authoritative treatments of important aspects of Old Testament study through commentaries and general surveys. The contributors are scholars of international standing.

Comments (2)
Samardenob
Anyone who wants to know what the Bible actually says, in contrast to what clerics say it says, needs to (1) read the commentaries of both traditional writers whose goal is to portray the biblical figures in the best possible light; who want to show that God is acting and helping people, both in the past and today, and (2) the commentaries by scholars who focus not on what pious people want to find, but on what the Bible actually states. The contrast between the two approaches is very enlightening. Looking at the traditional comments and comparing them with the scholarly ones, shows how wrong the traditional views frequently - but not always – do not say what the clerics say the Bible says. For example, in I Kings, chapters 1 to 11, the Bible mentions repeatedly, nineteen times, that Solomon was the wisest man who ever lived and who will live after him. It even demonstrates - or seems to do so - with two stories. In one, he is able to show which woman of two claimants is the true mother of a child. In the other, Solomon had so impressed a queen with his wisdom that she came to Israel from Africa to see him and hear his wisdom. Should we take the accolade at face value? Was Solomon truly wise? Did he always do the wise act and never do wrong?
Are the oft-repeated statements that Solomon was wise "protesting too much" (see Hamlet)? How can Solomon be so wise with all the many mistakes he makes? In every chapter where the accolade is given, there is a description of what Solomon did that would later destroy his kingdom. For, example, in chapter 3, Solomon married the daughter of Pharaoh, apparently to establish good relations with a strong foreign kingdom. But, as seen in chapter 11, she led him to build temples for idols and to idol worship in which he participated.
Dr. Sweeney's book is excellent. Readers will learn much from it. It is readable and comprehensive. It is part of the highly acclaimed series of commentaries called "The Old Testament Library."
Vobei
Marvin A. Sweeney, an author who has written several major exegetical works, turns out this volume on First and Second Kings in the Old Testament Library (OTL) series. There seems to be a consensus that this volume is an improvement on the earlier volume on Kings in this series by John Gray that it replaced. I’ve noticed several positive reviews on this volume, and if you wonder how it compares to others in the series, I’d say it’s stronger on exegetical matters and weaker on theological ones. Just as the others in the series, though, it well expresses the viewpoint of the critical camp.

After a lengthy bibliography, Mr. Sweeney begins his Introduction by explaining the big picture of First and Second Kings being a narrative history of Israel and Judah. In presenting his historical views that a conservative reader like me could never agree with, he explains that he feels these books are more designed to tell us why Israel and Judah were exiled rather than to present with historical accuracy. He further explains that the people and the kings have failed to obey the Lord and His word, and have brought God’s hand against themselves. While I could easily believe that along with the historical accuracy of these books, there is no doubt that the explanation of what happened to Israel and Judah is in view in these books.

With a peculiar confidence, he reviews sources, or as he calls it, deuteronomistic history. He will trace that through Josianic, Hezekian, Jehu Dynastic, and Solomonic histories. While I couldn’t get into that sort of thinking, it’s there if that’s your cup of tea. He well explains the textual history of Kings by looking at the Masoretic version, Hebrew manuscripts from Qumran, the Septuagint version, Peshitta and Syriac versions, and even the Vulgate. Which version you favor also plays into how he explains the chronology of Kings. To my mind, he seems antagonistic to the Masoretic text and arrives at a chronology I couldn’t agree with. Still, he explains the common critical assumptions with aplomb.

In the commentary proper, he commentates mostly on the final form of the text. He does at times mention some of these issues regarding sources, but the forte of this volume is its rigorous exegesis. As I see it, this is the best volume to grab to get a clear presentation of the critical viewpoint on the books of First and Second Kings.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.